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Programming Training Session August 2007 Katie Wilbor Coordinator, Bayside Family Day Care COPYRIGHT 2007 BAYSIDE FAMILY DAY CARE | REPRODUCTION OR REDISTRIBUTION.

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Presentation on theme: "Programming Training Session August 2007 Katie Wilbor Coordinator, Bayside Family Day Care COPYRIGHT 2007 BAYSIDE FAMILY DAY CARE | REPRODUCTION OR REDISTRIBUTION."— Presentation transcript:

1 Programming Training Session August 2007 Katie Wilbor Coordinator, Bayside Family Day Care COPYRIGHT 2007 BAYSIDE FAMILY DAY CARE | REPRODUCTION OR REDISTRIBUTION IS PROHIBIITED

2 why and how we program Understand why and how we program. why we observe Have an insight to how and why we observe. to brainstorm Gain knowledge on how to brainstorm extension activities & experiences. Gain comprehension of how and why we evaluate and reflect on our practices.

3 Our 7 Goals (5-7) To experience as small groups The 3-Step Programming Process’ ‘The 3-Step Programming Process’ To know what documents are required by the Legislation & Quality Assurance Guidelines To benefit from other Care Providers’ ideas on How to Display Programming & Development Files How to Display Programming & Development Files.

4 What does ‘Programming’ mean ? Programming is written documentation / evidence written documentation / evidence in which observe children’s development we can observe children’s development individually group individually or as a group in every day in every day activities, experiences, and routines.

5 Results of ‘Programming’ We can provide a varied & stimulating environment for the little people in our care, We can adapt to each individual child’s needs and interests.

6 Reasonsfor ‘Programming’ Reasons for ‘Programming’ each child’s strengths & interests To extend on each child’s strengths & interests e.g. what the child enjoys, always focusing on the positive aspect of a child’s development. Quality Assurance To conform to Quality Assurance & State Legislation Government Legislation. High Quality Care To provide the best High Quality Care we can to children, their families and the community.

7 How Do We Achieve Programming? By ‘3 Step Method’ Observing 1) Observing the children. Planning activities & experiences 2) Planning activities & experiences for the children from observations for the children from observations made. made. 3) Evaluating & reflecting on how those activities and experiences went, and activities and experiences went, and what was achieved. what was achieved.

8 Continuous ‘3 Step’ Cycle of Recording Children’s Progress

9 3 Step Programming Programming is a process that streamlines. It looks at the holistic child and surrounding environment. All 3 domains impact on each other and cannot exist without each other. The entire process requires you to be engaged & involved with the children even while observing the children.

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13 Continuous ‘3 Step’ Cycle of Recording Children’s Progress

14 Step 1: Observations Most adults spend time observing children. They watch them play, taking delight when a child says a first word or takes first steps. Observing is an ongoing process for people who have children in their lives. Observations made by Family Day Care providers are very different from those made by parents and grandparents because we observe children for different reasons. Observations made by Family Day Care providers are very different from those made by parents and grandparents because we observe children for different reasons.

15 How Do Family Day Care Providers Use ‘Observations’? Family Day Care Providers use observations: to provide high quality care to provide high quality care and a basis on which accurate information is collected to form a basis on which accurate information is collected to meet each child’s individual needs to meet each child’s individual needs.

16 ‘Developmentally Appropriate Care’ based on observations When providers know how each child is growing and developing based on observations: can provide a program based on this they can provide a program based on this knowledge knowledge, and then care they provide is more likely to be the care they provide is more likely to be developmentally appropriate developmentally appropriate.

17 ‘6 Reasons for Observing Children ’ 1. To determine each child’s interests, strengths and needs. 2. To measure each child’s progress and to identify each individual child. 3. To identify any additional support the child may require

18 ‘6 Reasons for Observing Children ’ 4. To keep records of each child’s competencies in all their developmental areas, 5. To provide a broad range of experiences that are culturally inclusive. 6. To share information with families and/or outside authorities if required

19 How Do We Observe ? write a short story about what the child is doing There are many different formats to observing. One very simple way is to write a short story about what the child is doing. develop your own system you integrate observing into your every day activities You yourself will develop your own system that will help you integrate observing into your every day activities and routines.

20 ’10 Tips on Observing’ 1. Try to observe each child once a week. 2. Give each child a simple code like a shape, so that an onlooker can see the link from the observation to the weekly displayed planner. 3. Adopt a schedule for observing the children in your care. 4. Write exactly what you see, and not what you think is happening 1 - 4

21 ’10 Tips on Observing’ 5. Observe children in small and large groups as well as individually. 6. Jot notes frequently. Carry a pad and pencil at handy reach. 7. Try to abbreviate and shorten what the child said, so that you can still get the gist of what they are saying. If you are observing the child’s language development, then a recorder could come in handy, to listen to later on

22 ’10 Tips on Observing’ Describe 8. Describe how a child is doing or saying something, remember to be objective! Have a reason to observe 9. Have a reason to observe e.g. to assess the child’s fine motor skills or to find out why a child doesn’t like playing outdoors or why a child gets frustrated. Share your observations 10. Share your observations with colleagues, family and coordinators to get some feed back for the next step of planning and brainstorming

23 Write the Observer’s Name on top of each observation. The Child’s Name. The Date of the Observation. The Setting e.g. at playgroup in the home area, or Alex sat in a homemade cubby under the table with books and cushions (it sets the scene for an onlooker). The Behaviour of What the Child Says and Does. Do Not Forget!

24 Example of an Objective Observation: Observer: Janice W. Date: 1/5/07 Time: 10:20am Setting: Outside in the paved area of back yard, in the water trough Observation: Jack moved the water back and forth with the funnel. The water splashed inside and outside of the basin. Some of the water fell on to the other children’s shoes. Jack looked at their shoes and began to giggle. This example is an objective recording. It includes facts of what Jack did, i.e. “Moved the water back and forth”. It describes what happened, i.e. “The water splashed inside and outside of the basin” It describes his reaction, i.e. “ Jack began to giggle”

25 Example of Objective Observation (continued) Making an objective and accurate observation time and practice takes lots of time and practice. engage with the children at all Just remember to engage with the children at all times -- playing with them gains you times -- and playing with them gains you valuable information. valuable information. record this information. Remember to record this information. more observations you take the better you will The more observations you take the better you will become in recording them, finding a system become in recording them, finding a system to suit your own needs & requirements.

26 Continuous ‘3 Step’ Cycle of Recording Children’s Progress

27 Step 2:Planning & Implementing Step 2: Planning & Implementing ‘Brainstorming’

28 Planning and Implementing Step 2: Brainstorming Weekly planning is a requirement of the State Legislation and Quality Assurance Guidelines. to plan an activity experience that will enhance the individual child’s developmentIt allows Care Providers to analyse the observations recorded for each child, and to plan an activity experience that will enhance the individual child’s development in a holistic way. planned experiences should be recorded in a weekly format that needs to be displayed for parents to see.These planned experiences should be recorded in a weekly format that needs to be displayed for parents to see.

29 Main Reasons to plan activities:  To assure that your program provides ongoing support for each individual child’s learning & development.  To help adapt and change the learning environment to suit different, individual children’s needs. Planning & Implementing

30 How Do We ‘Plan Activities’ ‘Brainstorm’ and ‘Brainstorm’ ?  Look at the individual observations  Look at the individual observations. Analyse them by looking at what the child is doing and identifying what it means e.g. “Jack is enjoying the water and using his thinking skills to move the water back and forth”  Then think about what the child enjoys playing  Then think about what the child enjoys playing with e.g. “Jack enjoyed the water and the funnels, he found it funny when the water splashed out of the bowl”  Think about some follow on activities that will enhance the child’s interests and development skills Then child’s interests and development skills -- Then transfer onto you weekly planner transfer onto you weekly planner using the individual child’s symbol, so that the link between the observation and follow on activity can be easily seen by an onlooker.

31 Water Play FILL WATER TROUGH with COLOURED WATER & STICKS Add more colour to introduce colour mixing (Maths & Science – Cognitive ) WATER TROUGH filled with boats and play people (Imaginative play) FLOATING & SINKING (Math’s and Science - Cognitive) READING STORIES “Teddy’s & mouse’s rainy picnic” and “ Little duck & the pond” ‘Brainstorming Ideas Example’ Go to THE BEACH and look for different shaped shells. Splash feet in water and discuss temperature. What do we see and hear? Smell and feel. (Environmental, Social & Emotional, Language Sensory) SONGS / RHYMES “Rain Rain Go Away” and “Jack & Jill Went Up The Hill” BUBBLE & STICKS Blowing bubbles (Fine and Gross motor skills and cognitive) COLLAGE, WATER Use different materials to discuss textures and touch (Creative, Cognitive and Language) Go to the LIBRARY to find BOOKS ABOUT WATER (Social, Emotional and Language)

32  Encourage the children to help plan activities/experiences, especially the school children. Drawing cutting out pictures and discussions can do this.  Think about long-term goals for children and include these into your planning.  You can do this in any format you choose. You can make it very simple or more complicated for yourself.  For example: You can add on to your observations an extra box that says ‘Extension activities or Follow on activities, such as …’ ’Tips on Planning’

33 Example 1:

34 Example 2: Observer: Observation: Follow on Activities: Date: Name: Age: Symbol: Time Setting: Observer: Observation: Follow on Activities: Date: Name: Age: Symbol: Time Setting: Observer: Observation: Follow on Activities: Date: Name: Age: Symbol: Time Setting:

35 need to be transferred to a plan to be displayed for all families and coordination unit staff and onlookers to see Once your activities have been explored for each individual child, the chosen activities / experiences need to be transferred to a plan to be displayed for all families and coordination unit staff and onlookers to see. This can done in many formats – ‘It is all up to you.’ Things to remember:  To use an individual symbol for each child to link the observation with the follow on activity/experiences.  To add incidental activities, as children will develop their own ideas and play.  To add an evaluation/reflection section of how your activities/experiences went for the week. ‘Weekly Program’

36 : Weekly plan example: Monday * Child 1 * Child 2 * Child 3 INCIDENTAL ACTIVITIES  Cubby made out of boxes from delivery of books.  Trip to Library to collect books on water and Boats.. DATE ________ Tuesday * Child 1 * Child 7 * Child 3 Wednesday * Child 7 * Child 4 * Child 3 Thursday * Child 1 * Child 2 * Child 8 Friday * Child 1 * Child 6 * Child 5 EVALUATION / REFLECTION How did activities go & kids respond? What materials were provided and processes took place? What skills did the children achieve? What went well & what did not go well? How can we extend their learning and what future resources may be required?

37 Continuous ‘3 Step’ Cycle of Recording Children’s Progress

38 Step 3: Evaluating & Reflecting What is an Evaluation? Evaluating is: An active process in which you reflect on your daily or weekly programming.

39 Why Do We Evaluate Our Programs?  To gain knowledge of how and why the children engaged in their play. To support and extend on any further learning for  To support and extend on any further learning for yourself and the individual children. yourself and the individual children.  To determine and value the relevance of different activities/experiences. activities/experiences.  To establish and identify new practices and ideas for future planning. for future planning.

40 ’7 Tips on Evaluating & Reflecting’ 1. Think about how the child(ren) responded to certain experiences experiences 2. What processes took place to achieve these activities? 3. Think about what materials and equipment you needed to supply. Were they too much, or possibly not to supply. Were they too much, or possibly not enough? enough? 4. What learning skills were enhanced? 5. How did the children and you participate and engage in the activities? in the activities? 1 - 5

41 ’7 Tips on Evaluating & Reflecting’ extend the children’s 6. Can you follow on and extend the children’s learning and development? How? learning and development? How? additional resources may have been required 7. What additional resources may have been required, or may need sourcing for the future? If you follow these handy tips when evaluating your, you will gain extensive daily or weekly routines, you will gain extensive knowledge of the children in your care knowledge of the children in your care, wide stimulating This will enable you to provide a wide stimulating program enhance the children’s program that will enrich and enhance the children’s development and lives development and lives forever

42 ‘Practical Session’ IN SMALL GROUPS ► Look at each of the 2 photographs to follow ► Pick a picture discuss what you think is happening ► Pick a picture and discuss what you think is happening in the picture. ►Jot down a short story of what is happening in the pictures ► Jot down a short story of what is happening in the pictures and how the children are engaging with one another. ► What might they be saying to one another? ► What might they be saying to one another? (Remember to write down what is happening and what is said in an objective way). ►jot down any skills or development ► Then jot down any skills or development the children maybe learning from this play. ► Brainstorm a few follow on activities/experiences ► Brainstorm a few follow on activities/experiences that would extend on the children’s play and enhance their development.

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44 Phone Talk

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46 Documents Required for Display as Evidence for Quality Assurance & To Meet Legislative Standards  Daily communication books for all children in care.  A confidential folder of weekly observations and extension activities. extension activities.  A displayed weekly program, linking back to the observations, by simple individual symbols for each observations, by simple individual symbols for each child. child.  A daily or weekly evaluation of your displayed weekly program and vacation program. program and vacation program.

47 Documents Required as Evidence (continued).  Remember to keep everything as evidence.  Take lots of photographs to supplement your programming.  Engage and interact in a positive manner with the children all the time, as this will make a huge impact on the children’s development and lives.

48 This form of programming is called ‘THE EMERGENT CURRICULUM’ It is all based around the children’s interests and skills and how you positively interact and engage with them how you look at the whole child’s needs and produce a program full of experiences that include all aspects of the world around them.

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