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Mason County Health Department Food Handlers Training Class Training Class.

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Presentation on theme: "Mason County Health Department Food Handlers Training Class Training Class."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Mason County Health Department Food Handlers Training Class Training Class

3 Food Housing/Institutions Milk Child Care Restaurant Mobile Home Parks Grocery Hotels Temporary food Bed and Breakfast Recreation Water Parks Bottled Campground Individual Wells Pools Community Fair/festivals

4 Sewage Training/Education Individual Disaster Preparedness Subdivision Disease Control/ Epi Home Aerator Rabies Sewage Cleaners Tattoo Studios

5 Why Are You Here? Receive training on Proper food handling Food storage Serving food Employee health Obtain card that expires every 3 years Prevent Foodborne illness in the community

6 Why Practice Food Safety? The health of everyone eating food depends on the food employee’s actions. Sloppy food preparation can result in FOOD POISONING

7 What is Food Poisoning / Food borne Illness? A disease that is carried or transmitted to humans by food containing harmful substances.

8 Food Poisoning IS A Big Deal Over 250 known organisms & agents Over 250 known organisms & agents  76 million cases in the US  5,000 deaths in US yearly  8th leading cause of death worldwide  3rd most common illness complaint  Everyone is at risk

9 Factors Causing Foodborne Illness Infected employees who practice poor personal hygiene at work (this is the #1 cause of illness) 2. Failure to properly cool food 3. Failure to thoroughly heat or cook food 4. Allowing foods to stay too long at temperatures favoring bacterial growth (danger zone ° F) 5. Failure to reheat cooked foods to temperatures that kill bacteria (reheat to 165° F or above) 6. Cross-contamination of cooked food by raw food, improperly cleaned equipment, or employees who mishandle food

10 What Bacteria Needs To Grow. Food Acidity Time Temperature Oxygen Moisture

11 Common symptoms include: Abdominal Pain Nausea Vomiting Diarrhea Headache Fever Cramps Chills

12 Staph Found in cuts, sores, pimples, throat infections, and on the skin. Found in cuts, sores, pimples, throat infections, and on the skin. Spreads from people handling food. Spreads from people handling food. Is heat resistant. Is heat resistant. Foods: meat, poultry, salads, cheese egg products, starchy salads, custards, cream filled desserts. Foods: meat, poultry, salads, cheese egg products, starchy salads, custards, cream filled desserts.

13 Salmonella Found in infected meat, poultry, eggs, fish, and unpasteurized milk. Found in infected meat, poultry, eggs, fish, and unpasteurized milk. Spread by undercooked food, and cross contamination. Spread by undercooked food, and cross contamination. Cook food thoroughly. Cook food thoroughly. Keep raw and cooked food separate. Keep raw and cooked food separate.

14 Clostridium Perfringens The buffet or picnic germ. Grows rapidly in large portions of food that are cooling slowly. Can also grow when food is not held at proper holding temperatures. Keep hot food over 135° F. Keep cold food under 41° F. Cool and reheat food properly.

15 Clostridium Botulinum “Botulism” Occurs in improperly canned foods; home canned or commercially canned. Occurs in improperly canned foods; home canned or commercially canned. Warning signs are: clear liquids turned milky, cracked jars, loose lids, swollen cans, dented cans or lids. Warning signs are: clear liquids turned milky, cracked jars, loose lids, swollen cans, dented cans or lids. Beware of any can that spurts liquid or has an off odor when opened. Beware of any can that spurts liquid or has an off odor when opened. Don’t use any canned goods showing any of the warning signs. Don’t use any canned goods showing any of the warning signs. If you suspect that you or a family member has botulism symptoms, get medical help immediately. If you suspect that you or a family member has botulism symptoms, get medical help immediately.

16 “ Botulism” Symptoms FATIGUE HEADACHE DIZZINESS VISUAL DISTURBANCES INABILITY TO SWALLOW

17 Shigella Food or water contaminated with fecal material Ready-to-eat foods touched by infected foodhandler Persons who are infected may have no symptoms at all, but may still pass the Shigella bacteria to others. Incubation period hours

18 Noro - Virus Ready-to-eat foods (including ice) touched by infected worker Ready-to-eat foods (including ice) touched by infected worker (poor handwashing procedures) High percentage of food-borne illness Incubation period hours

19 Personnel with infections Food handling conducted by a person with a communicable disease, sores, boils, respiratory infection, etc.

20 Employee Clothing Hair Must be restrained by net, cap, braid Clothing Clean, uniforms washed daily Jewelry None except single wedding band Nails Short, clean No artificial nails

21 Your Health Can Affect Others! Do NOT prepare food if: you have been diagnosed with a foodborne illness you are vomiting you have diarrhea you have a fever you have a sore throat and fever you are jaundiced Any open sore or wound must be covered

22 Wash Your Hands! Wash your hands for 20 sec. with hot soapy water BEFORE: Handling food Putting on clean glovesAFTER: Using the toilet Handling raw foods Taking a break / smoking Coughing, sneezing, eating, drinking Cleaning / taking out trash As often as necessary to remove soil and contamination Taking off gloves Changing Tasks

23 HAND SANITIZERS Hand sanitizers are not a substitute for handwashing when water and soap are readily available Most often used as additional step in preventing spread of germs

24 Hand Sinks Are Important! Hand sinks must have: Warm running water Soap and Hand drying device (single-use) Nothing can be stored in front of, in or on the hand sink at any time.

25 NO Bare Hand Contact NO bare hand contact with foods that are ready-to-eat Use: Single Use-Gloves Tongs Deli tissue Other utensils

26 Gloves Single use only Change between tasks Tend to give false sense of assurance that hands are clean Glove use is not a substitute for handwashing

27 Clean Wiping Cloths Store wiping cloths in sanitizer solution between uses. Sanitizer should be 50 ppm chlorine or an equivalent chemical –1 gallon water to 1-2 caps of bleach Change sanitizer solution often! (use test strips to measure concentration)

28 3 Sinks to Wash Utensils! 3 - Sink Set Up: Wash – using detergent and 120°F water Rinse – in clear warm water Sanitize – using ppm chlorine or an equivalent chemical Air dry Rinse Scrape Soak Air Dry WASHRINSESANITIZE (use test strips to measure concentration of sanitizer)

29 Dishwashers Wash – using detergent and hot water °F Rinse – clear hot water Sanitize – Hot water - 180°F Chemical sanitizer – ppm chlorine or an equivalent chemical (use test strips to measure concentration)

30 Food Prep and Handling Order and obtain food from reliable source. Home canned foods, ice made at home or foods prepared and stored in private homes are not allowed. In 1938, before widespread adoption of milk pastuerization, 25% of foodbourne outbreaks were associated with milk. In 2001, less than 1%

31 Food Prep and Handling When food shipments are received, look for: - frozen food should be frozen, and show no signs of being wet and refrozen. - dry goods should be dry and clean. - no obvious signs of spoilage.

32 Food Guide Date mark PHF with a use by date. 1. at the time of preparation, if prepared on the premises and held over 24 hours or 2. at time container is opened, if obtained from a commercial food processing plant. Consume by date = 7 days or less at 41° F.

33 How to Thaw - Chill Thaw frozen foods the right way! In the refrigerator Under running cold (70°F) water In microwave During cooking DO “NOT” THAW FROZEN FOODS AT ROOM TEMP Then Immediately cooked

34 CHILL Do NOT cool food in 5 gallon containers or large pots!

35 Food Guide Hot & Cold Holding 41° F or less. 135° F or greater THIS IS THE DANGER ZONE! THIS IS THE DANGER ZONE! Cooling Potentially Hazardous Foods Within 2 hours: 135 to 70° F. Within 4 hours: 70 to 41° F.

36 Chill Use proper cooling methods Cool all hot foods from 135°F to 70°F in 2 hours or less and from 70°F to 41°F in another 4 hours or less Ice Bath Ice Wand Shallow Pans (not deeper than 2 inches) Blast Chiller

37 Separate Equipment to Food Do NOT use the same cutting board or equipment to prepare raw meats and cooked or ready-to-eat foods UNLESS cutting boards, equipment, utensils and hands have been washed, rinsed and sanitized between each use!

38 Thermometers All refrigerators and cold holding units must have an accurate visible thermometer. A probe thermometer must be readily available Clean and sanitize before each use If you don’t have a thermometer, how do you know the temperature? Need one? Ask Me

39 Potentially Hazardous Foods Foods that require temperature control because it is able to support growth of bacteria Eggs, meats, poultry, fish, dairy foods, hot dogs, cream pies, cooked rice, potatoes, sliced fruits, chili

40 Non-potentially Hazardous foods Includes: dry goods cereals cookies breads cakes potato chips popcorn candy bars

41 Food Allergens l Milk, egg, fish, tree nuts, wheat, peanuts and soybeans l A food ingredient that contains protein derived from a food listed in this definition.

42 Temporary Food Stands Less than 14 consecutive days FairsFestivals CarnivalCircus Regatta

43 Concession Workers Same guidelines apply as in regular food service facilities

44 Handwashing Facilities

45 Dishwashing Facilities

46 Equipment and Utensils Keep clean and sanitized Best to use single service items and must be individually wrapped Store utensils with food handle up Make sure have running water dipper well for ice cream utensils Best place to store the serving spoon is in the product being served.

47 Flooring/ Building -- Covered structure designed to protect against dust, weather and insects. --Covered waste containers. -- Cleanable floors, no dirt, plastic, or canvas --Adequate lighting and shielded bulbs --Approved water hose from water source

48 Food Storage Dry Everything off floor 6 to 8 inches Check dates Rotate stock to prevent outdates and waste Clean Well labeled containers that prevent water, moisture, insects and rodents to enter.

49 Food Storage l Cold – Refrigerator at 41 degrees F. – Keep everything off floor and keep floor clean. – Leave airspace around items, and avoid overcrowding – Keep meats and eggs on lower racks—leakage. – Prepared foods on upper racks Covered Dated Labeled

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66 HAVE A SAFE TRIP HOME “KEEP THE FOOD YOU SERVE SAFE!” SERVE


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