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SPED 586 Planning and Teaching for Understanding Chapter 1.

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Presentation on theme: "SPED 586 Planning and Teaching for Understanding Chapter 1."— Presentation transcript:

1 SPED 586 Planning and Teaching for Understanding Chapter 1

2 Overview Common Issues and Cues RtI basics IEPs Self-determinism Evaluation measures ELL success Scaffolding Tiered instruction

3 Common Issues Academics! If it doesn’t affect performance, then why are we addressing it. Attention Problems and hyperactivity Memory – the affect of short term memory on school performance Language Aberrant behavior, such as aggression or depression or “unusual patterns”

4 Determine these factors Is it a concern or a disability? Question: 1. How persistent is the problem? 2. How severe is the problem? 3. Is the child making stead progress? 4. Is the child interested in improvement? 5. How active is the family? 6. Do other people see this as a problem? 7. Is this a problem between a teacher and a student? 8. What accommodations and modifications have been attempted? 9. Has the instruction thus far been adequate for the student’s needs? 10. How well does the child fit in with peers? 11. What else could explain this academic or social behavior?

5 5 Behavior AreaEmotional DisturbanceSocially Maladjusted School Behavior Unable to comply with teacher requests; needy or has difficulty asking for help Unwilling to comply with teacher requests; truancy; rejects help Attitude Toward School School is a source of confusion or angst; does much better with structure Dislikes school, except as a social outlet; rebels against rules and structure School Attendance Misses school due to emotional or psychosomatic issues Misses school due to choice Educational Performance Uneven achievement; impaired by anxiety, depression, or emotions Achievement influenced by truancy, negative attitude toward school, avoidance Peer Relations and Friendships Difficulty making friends; ignored or rejected Accepted by a same delinquent or socio-cultural subgroup Perceptions of PeersPerceived as bizarre or odd; often ridiculedPerceived as cool, tough, charismatic Social Skills Poorly developed; immature; difficulty reading social cues; difficulty entering groups Well developed; well attuned to social cues Interpersonal Relations Inability to establish or maintain relationships; withdrawn; social anxiety Many relations within select peer group; manipulative; lack of honesty in relationships Interpersonal Dynamics Poor self-concept; overly dependant; anxious; fearful; mood swings; distorts reality Inflated self concept; independent; underdeveloped conscience; blames others; excessive bravado Locus of DisorderAffective disorder; internalizingConduct disorder, externalizing AggressionHurts self and others as an endHurts others as a means to an end AnxietyTense; fearfulAppears relaxed; “cool” Affective Reactions Disproportionate reactions, but not under student’s control Intentional with features of anger and rage; explosive ConscienceRemorseful; self critical; overly seriousLittle remorse; blaming; non-empathetic Sense of RealityFantasy; naïve; gullible; thought disorders “Street-wise”; manipulates facts and rules for own benefit Developmental Appropriateness Immature; regressiveAge appropriate or above Risk TakingAvoids risks; resists making choicesRisk taker; “daredevil” Substance AbuseLess likely; may use individuallyMore likely; peer involvement Adapted from Social Maladjustment: A Guide to Differential Diagnosis and Educational Options (Wayne County Regional Educational Service Agency - Michigan, 2004)

6 IEPs Name the parts of an IEP. Name the multidisciplinary members (do not forget you know who) Goals: academic, social-emotional, functional – Focus on what is working more so than what isn’t. – Set goals on what the student should maintain as well as build. Samples and help – Sample 1 Sample 1 – Sample 2 Sample 2 – IEP best practices (USDOE) IEP best practices (USDOE)

7 Self-determinism Teach students to become self-determined – in that their own well being and range of success is a result of their efforts and achievement. When students work hard, they tend to improve their success. Engagement and achievement are correlated Prepare students to participate and lead their own IEPs UNCC’s review of self-determinism curricula One sample curricula (NICHCY) Name three reasons we need to emphasize self-determinism?

8 Evaluation Measures Progress Monitoring National Center on Progress Monitoring Basics to CBM (National Center on RtI) – Multiple types of progress charts How would you quantify calling out? How would you quantify multiplication knowledge? – Informed instruction through data collection and evaluation

9 ELL For students with LD who are ELL, instruction must be: – Explicit – Monitored – Include plenty of practice – Include language acquisition strategies How is this different from others who struggle?

10 Scaffolding Two types of scaffolding Within lessons – I might scaffold addition of fractions with like denominators by showing why and how the numerators will be added but the denominator remains constant. I will not only show why but I will also show how. To help this process, I can prepare strategies to help the student recognize the type of problem and the appropriate steps to take to solve that problem. Between lessons - You might see guided practice and scaffolding when completing simple equations. Teach to divide or compute by the inverse of the coefficient early to prepare for the lessons to come.

11 Multi-tiered system of support (MTSS) MTSS and Response to Instruction and Intervention (RtI&I) involve tiered instruction. Each successive tier increases intensity of instruction through more explicitness in teaching, smaller class sizes, more time of instruction, and more homogenous to individualized help.

12 How does a tiered system work for Reading? Effective Instruction is a necessity at all levels, not just for those with reading trouble Assessment must be consistent and accurate across all levels Interventions must be effective (research and evidence-supported) 12

13 How does a tiered system work for Writing? Effective Instruction is a necessity at all levels, not just for those who struggle with writing or written expression Assessment must be consistent and accurate Interventions must be effective (research and evidence supported) 13

14 How does a tiered system work for Mathematics Ed? Effective Instruction is a necessity at all levels, not just for those with poor calculations skills Assessment must be consistent and accurate Interventions must be effective (research and evidence supported) 14

15 How does a tiered system work for Behavior? Effective Instruction is a necessity at all levels, not just for those with inappropriate behavior Assessment must be consistent and accurate Interventions must be effective (research and evidence supported) 15

16 Summation What does this mean to your planning? ◦ In your current placement? ◦ In your future class? How can you implement tiered and differentiated help in your classroom?


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