Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Breaking Barriers in Massive Star Formation with Stellar Interferometry Willem-Jan de Wit (ESO) Rene Oudmaijer (Leeds) Melvin Hoare (Leeds) Hugh Wheelwright.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Breaking Barriers in Massive Star Formation with Stellar Interferometry Willem-Jan de Wit (ESO) Rene Oudmaijer (Leeds) Melvin Hoare (Leeds) Hugh Wheelwright."— Presentation transcript:

1 Breaking Barriers in Massive Star Formation with Stellar Interferometry Willem-Jan de Wit (ESO) Rene Oudmaijer (Leeds) Melvin Hoare (Leeds) Hugh Wheelwright (Leeds)

2 What are the dominant structures emitting in N-band? Spherical models: ISO-SWS N-band

3 MIDI at the VLTI Mid-IR beam combiner (N-band) Combining 2 VLTI beams (UTs or ATs) Spectrally dispersed fringes (30 & 230) Baselines 10 to 200 meters (10 mas) Visibilities Leinert et al. (2004): MIDI instrument Haguenaur et al. (2008): VLTI architecture 13 micron 8 micron

4 The case of W33A: jets and outflows JCMT/HARP 12CO(3-2): L = 10 5 L o D kin = 3.8 kpc Weak, compact radio emission (Rengarajan & Ho 1995) Broad single peaked HI emission (Bunn et al. 1995) Fast bipolar jet (Br g) (Davies et al. 2010) K-band (UKIDSS), VLTI baselines: Davies et al milli-arcsecond

5 The case of W33A: jets and outflows JCMT/HARP 12CO(3-2): L = 10 5 L o D kin = 3.8 kpc Weak, compact radio emission (Rengarajan & Ho 1995) Broad single peaked HI emission (Bunn et al. 1995) Fast bipolar jet (Br g) (Davies et al. 2010) K-band (UKIDSS), VLTI baselines: Laser-guide star assisted NIFS at Gemini North (Davies et al. 2010) 4 AU

6 The case of W33A: jets and outflows JCMT/HARP 12CO(3-2): L = 10 5 L o D kin = 3.8 kpc Weak, compact radio emission (Rengarajan & Ho 1995) Broad single peaked HI emission (Bunn et al. 1995) Fast bipolar jet (Br g) (Davies et al. 2010) K-band (UKIDSS), VLTI baselines: Davies et al milli-arcsecond

7 W33A MIDI observables FLUX spectrum Visibility spectrum (micron) 4 baselines Near perpendicular PAs Baselines stretching between 40 and 60 meters

8 W33A MIDI observables FLUX spectrum Visibility spectrum (micron) 4 baselines Near-perpendicular PAs Baselines stretching between 40 and 60 meters Equivalent Gaussian FWHM sizes between 95 and 115AU No flux 95AU

9 W33A model fit Model 350 micron: Near-IR: Van der Tak et al. (2000) Axi-symmetric dust radiative transfer code ( Whitney et al ) TSC Envelope, outflow cavity, and disk Observed Model H-band K-band H - K

10 W33A model fit (cont.) MIDI Visibilities: Dust model parameters: No disk, only envelope (cavities) M infall = M o /yr R sub = 25 AU (nominal) A v = 230 T eff = K R * = 8.5 R o M * = 25 M o 2*q = 20 o (opening angle) 2200AU Monochromatic images on the sky: de Wit et al. 2010

11 W33A and disk emission Disk limits from N-band interferometry: Dust disk : M < 0.01M o Accretion disk : M acc < M o /yr Davies et al. 2010

12 Disk signature in AFGL 2136 ? UKIDSS K-band L= 7e4 Lsol D= 2.0 Kpc Polarization disk (Murakawa et al. 2008) Arcmin bipolar CO outflow (Kastner et al. 1995) Compact, 70AU radio emission (Menten & Van der Tak 2004) K-band polarization (Murakawa et al. 2008) 1 arcminute outflow

13 Same procedure as W33A (2.5D axisymmetric dust radiative transfer) Fit envelope emission (SED, 24.5 mu and N-band short spacing) Necessity of compact emitting source at <8.5 micron for MIDI visibilities Disk signature in AFGL 2136 ?

14 Same procedure as W33A (2.5D axisymmetric dust radiative transfer) Fit envelope emission (SED, 24.5 mu and N-band short spacing) Necessity of compact emitting source at <8.5 micron for MIDI visibilities Either accretion disk or supergiant star to fit N-band dispersed visibilities Disk signature in AFGL 2136 ? Monnier et al. (2009)

15 Same procedure as W33A (2.5D axisymmetric dust radiative transfer) Fit envelope emission (SED, 24.5 mu and N-band short spacing) Necessity of compact emitting source at <8.5 micron for MIDI visibilities Either accretion disk or supergiant star to fit N-band dispersed visibilities Disk signature in AFGL 2136 ?

16 Same procedure as W33A (2.5D axisymmetric dust radiative transfer) Fit envelope emission (SED, 24.5 mu and N-band short spacing) Short spacing + SED : 120 AU dust radius Necessity of compact emitting source at <8.5 micron for MIDI visibilities Either accretion disk or supergiant star to fit N-band dispersed visibilities M acc : M o /yr Disk signature in AFGL 2136 ? 1.5” 8 micron

17 Conclusions N-band interferometry is able to provide important new insights in the formation of high-mass stars. In W33A: N-band emission at 100 AU scale is dominated by warm dust in the interface between outflow cavity and envelope Contribution by accretion disk is similar or less than TSC envelope infall rate AFGL 2136: evidence for compact emission: supergiant star or accretion disk

18 Near future with VLTI PIONIER : 4 beam combiner H & K bands, R=40 Commissioning & early science November 2010 (JP Berger et al. 2010) MATISSE: 4 beam combiner L, M, N bands (R=30, 1500) 2014 (Wolff et al.)

19 MIDI observations of IRAS AU 2.2 micron 8.0 micron Image cuts 0.1% and 10% of maximum Visibilities: over-resolved component 40% flux

20 AFGL 2136 IRS1 (de wit et al. In prep) W33A (de Wit et al 2010) IRS9A (Vehoff et al. 2010)


Download ppt "Breaking Barriers in Massive Star Formation with Stellar Interferometry Willem-Jan de Wit (ESO) Rene Oudmaijer (Leeds) Melvin Hoare (Leeds) Hugh Wheelwright."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google