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Project work on the topic Spoken etiquette in English-speaking countries Spoken etiquette in English-speaking countries.

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Presentation on theme: "Project work on the topic Spoken etiquette in English-speaking countries Spoken etiquette in English-speaking countries."— Presentation transcript:

1 Project work on the topic Spoken etiquette in English-speaking countries Spoken etiquette in English-speaking countries

2 The aim. the aim of my research is to study basic specific traits of the spoken etiquette in England. Spoken etiquette in English-speaking countries

3  study basic rules of the English spoken etiquette  find out about their origin  observe their consequences Objectives Spoken etiquette in English-speaking countries

4  Bibliographic analysis  Observation (films) Methods Spoken etiquette in English-speaking countries

5 “Everyone has a right to privacy” ↓ “the rule of ignoring” ↓ try to avoid communicating with foreigners as long as it is not absolutely necessary

6 three cases when the English would not observe the rule: when silence would be even more impolite when you need to get some essential information urgently when there is some misfortune

7

8 the rule of context. It`s acceptable to comment on the weather in three situations: when you`re greeting the partner, when you need to switch over the conversation onto a target topic when there is nothing else to say so that you keep the conversation going.

9 the rule of agreement. Comments on the weather sound like questions, but their aim is to communicate rather than to enquire your opinion. That`s why it is considered extremely rude to disagree with your partner. All you can do is to express your personal preferences highlighting that you do realise they are strange, and even in that case you should start your reply with the word “yes” :

10 the rule of ranking weather types. sunny and warm weather sunny and chilly or cold weather cloudy and warm weather cloudy and chilly or cold weather rainy and warm weather rainy and chilly or cold weather

11 the rule of “not too much”

12 Greeting and meeting new people the rule of “no names”. the rule of embarrassment. the rule of guessing game.

13 “guessing” game if your partner could hold different positions at his/her working place, you should suppose s/he holds a higher one. you shouldn`t ignore the hints which you`re being given. when you have discovered the partner`s occupation, you`re expected to express surprise.

14 Gossiping: the rule of respecting privacy the rule of distance the rule of being equally outspoken

15 “the ritual of exchanging compliments” Oh, you`ve got a new haircut! It suits you very well! Oh, there`s no use in making new haircuts with my greyish thin hair. But your hair is beautiful no matter what the haircut is. Oh, come on! It is horrible! So awfully wavy, I can`t stand that! I would also like to have a haircut similar to yours, but it doesn`t match the shape of my face. And yours is really nice!

16 “Mine is better than yours”

17 rules of behavior “the rule of ignoring” “a reflexive sorry” The English are very polite the rules of standing in a queue

18 Asking for opinions  So, what do you think..?;  Do you like..?  How do you like..?;  What’s your opinion..?;  Don’t you agree?  And what about you?  What do you think of it?  Well, that looks really nice!  It’s really beautiful/absolutely great!  Mmmm, that smells/ looks sounds/ … great! Paying compliments Spoken etiquette in English-speaking countries

19 agreement That’s very true; I quite agree with you; I couldn’t agree more; I partly/totally agree; You’re absolutely right disagreement : I don’t think so…; I (don’t) feel…; I’m not sure you’re right…; Perhaps you’re right, but on the other hand…; That’s not quite the way I see it…; I see what you mean, but…

20 Asking for advice  What do you think I should do if…  I have a problem and am deciding what to…  I really don’t know what to do about…  Any ideas what I could do … Giving advice Verbal phrases: You’d better…; Whatever you do, don’t…; I suggest you…; I strongly recommend you… Second Conditional: If I were you, I’d…; If I were in your shoes, I’d… Modals: should, ought to, have to, must,can, may, may,might, could. could. Spoken etiquette in English-speaking countries

21 Making suggestions  What about going…  Don’t you mind...  Do you fancy going…  Why don’t we…  Let’s…  Have you thought about…  We could…  That’s a good/great idea!  Brilliant!  That would be great!  OK, Why not?  I think you’re right, let’s… Reacting to suggestions  I don’t think it’s a good idea  I’m not really into…  I don’t know what good it would do… Spoken etiquette in English-speaking countries

22 Apologising  Excuse me!  I beg your pardon!  I’m terribly sorry!  Please, forgive me!  I really must apologise to you!  Please accept my apologies for….  I want to ask your forgiveness…  I want to ask you to forgive me for…  I do apologise for…  Do forgive me for… A correct respond to an apology  It’s quite all right  No harm done  No need to be sorry  Never mind  It’s OK.  Please don’t apologise…  That’s not your fault! Spoken etiquette in English-speaking countries

23 Ways of farewell  Goodbye!  Goodbye for now!  See you soon!  Till we meet again!  All the best!  Take care!  God bless you!  Good luck!  I'll be seeing you!  I'm not saying goodbye Spoken etiquette in English-speaking countries

24 Humour rules “it`s important not to be serious”. “Oh, come off it!”. the rule of underestimation. the rule of self-humiliation.

25 rules of behavior at work “it`s important not to be serious”. the rule of modesty. the rule of polite delay. taboo over talking about money. the rule of playing honestly. the rule of complaining.

26 differences in the ways people of different social classes communicate. “pardon” ( “Sorry?”, “Sorry – what?”, “What?”) “toilet” ( “loo”, “lavatory”, “gents/ladies”, “bathroom”, “facilities/conveniences”, “powder room”) “serviette” ( “napkin”) “dinner” ( “lunch”) “settee” or “couch” ( “sofa”) “living room ” or “lounge”( “sitting room or “drawing room”) “sweet”, “afters” or “dessert”( “pudding”) “posh” (“smart”)


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