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Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Permission Required for Reproduction or Display. Basic Weight Training Exercises to Develop Speed and Power.

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Presentation on theme: "Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Permission Required for Reproduction or Display. Basic Weight Training Exercises to Develop Speed and Power."— Presentation transcript:

1 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Permission Required for Reproduction or Display. Basic Weight Training Exercises to Develop Speed and Power Chapter 11

2 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Permission Required for Reproduction or Display. The more I train, the more I realize I have more speed in me. — LeRoy Burrell

3 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Permission Required for Reproduction or Display.Plyometrics Involve rapid stretching then shortening of muscles during highly dynamic movementsInvolve rapid stretching then shortening of muscles during highly dynamic movements Stretching causes stretch reflex and elastic recoil that increases the force of shorteningStretching causes stretch reflex and elastic recoil that increases the force of shortening Movements involve absorbing shock and following it up with vigorous muscle contractionMovements involve absorbing shock and following it up with vigorous muscle contraction © 2007 Thomas Fahey

4 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Permission Required for Reproduction or Display. Principles of Plyometrics Emphasize quality over quantity.Emphasize quality over quantity. Perform movements as quickly as possible; i.e., land and jump immediately.Perform movements as quickly as possible; i.e., land and jump immediately. Build strength and fitness before attempting plyometrics.Build strength and fitness before attempting plyometrics. Maintain control of the spine during plyometrics.Maintain control of the spine during plyometrics. Don’t do advanced exercises (one-leg and box jumps) until you have mastered easier ones (two leg exercises from the ground).Don’t do advanced exercises (one-leg and box jumps) until you have mastered easier ones (two leg exercises from the ground). Don’t do plyometrics more than 2 to 3 days per week.Don’t do plyometrics more than 2 to 3 days per week. Modify or stop program if you get injured.Modify or stop program if you get injured.

5 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Permission Required for Reproduction or Display. Plyometrics and Bone Plyometrics help build bone density, particularly in girls.Plyometrics help build bone density, particularly in girls. The rate force is applied to bone is more important than absolute force for building bone.The rate force is applied to bone is more important than absolute force for building bone. Bone mass peaks in women at age 20 to 30 years. Women should bank bone when they’re young.Bone mass peaks in women at age 20 to 30 years. Women should bank bone when they’re young. Older men lose bone mass too, so bone-building exercise is important for both genders.Older men lose bone mass too, so bone-building exercise is important for both genders.

6 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Permission Required for Reproduction or Display. Calf Jumps Stand with feet shoulder width apart and hands on hips. Bend knees slightly. Using mainly calf muscles, jump rapidly in place for 10 repetitions. © 2007 Thomas Fahey

7 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Permission Required for Reproduction or Display. Squat Jumps Stand with feet shoulder width apart and bend knees slightly. Jump up and drive arms upward. As you land, retract arms and squat down, then jump again as quickly and explosively as possible. Do 5-10 repetitions per set. © 2007 Thomas Fahey

8 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Permission Required for Reproduction or Display. Tuck Squat Jumps Stand with feet shoulder width apart; bend knees slightly. Jump up and drive arms upward. Tuck knees at the top of the jump. As you land, extend legs and retract arms and prepare to jump again. Do 5-10 repetitions, taking as little time as possible between jumps. © 2007 Thomas Fahey

9 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Permission Required for Reproduction or Display. Mule Kick Squat Jumps Stand with feet shoulder width apart; bend knees slightly. Jump up and drive arms upward. At the top of the jump, kick your heels backwards and touch the back of your thighs. As you land, extend legs and retract arms and prepare to jump again. Do 5-10 repetitions, taking as little time as possible between jumps. © 2007 Thomas Fahey

10 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Permission Required for Reproduction or Display. 360° Squat Jumps Stand with feet shoulder width apart with knees bent slightly. Jump up and drive your arms upward, spinning in the air as much as possible. Begin with 30-60° turns and progress to 360°. As you land, retract your arms and prepare to jump again. Start by rotating in only one direction. As you become more advanced, rotate to the left on one repetition and to the right on the next. Do 5-10 repetitions, taking as little time as possible between jumps. © 2007 Thomas Fahey

11 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Permission Required for Reproduction or Display. 1-Leg Squat Jumps Stand on one leg and bend your knee slightly. Jump up and drive your arms upward. As you land retract your arms and immediately jump again. Do 5-10 repetitions, taking as little time as possible between jumps. © 2007 Thomas Fahey

12 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Permission Required for Reproduction or Display. Ice Skaters Stand with weight on the inside part of your feet. Using a speed skating motion, drive off your left leg and swing both arms to the right. Immediately drive with the right leg to the left. Move as quickly as possible when going from one leg to the other. © 2007 Thomas Fahey

13 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Permission Required for Reproduction or Display. Lunge Jumps From a standing position, jump up, then land in a split position with your right leg bent and your left leg extended in back of you. After landing, immediately jump up, and again land in a split position with your legs reversed. During this exercise, try to keep your body straight and jump up as high as possible. © 2007 Thomas Fahey

14 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Permission Required for Reproduction or Display. Standing Long Jump Stand with feet shoulder width apart and toes just behind the starting (scratch) line. Bend your knees and bring your hands below your waist, then jump as far as you can. Try to extend fully with you ankles, knees, hips, and arms to jump as far as possible. © 2007 Thomas Fahey

15 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Permission Required for Reproduction or Display.Skiers Stand with your feet together. Jump with both feet together forward and to the left side, land, then jump forward and to the right. Jump as quickly as possible for 5-10 repetitions. You have done one repetition when you’ve jumped to the left and right sides. © 2007 Thomas Fahey

16 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Permission Required for Reproduction or Display. Cone Hops Space 3-6 large 2-foot cones (or similar objects) approximately 3 feet apart. Stand in front of the first cone with feet shoulder width apart. Jump over the cones as quickly as possible. © 2007 Thomas Fahey

17 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Permission Required for Reproduction or Display. Hurdle Hops Place 3-5 hurdles approximately 3 feet apart. Start with hurdle at its lowest height. Keeping feet shoulder width apart, hop over the hurdles as quickly as possible using both legs. © 2007 Thomas Fahey

18 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Permission Required for Reproduction or Display. Plyometric Push-ups From a standard or modified push- up position, push up forcefully, extending your elbows fully until your hands leave the ground. Bounce back to your hands; then repeat the exercise. Clap after you push-up as fitness improves. © 2007 Thomas Fahey

19 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Permission Required for Reproduction or Display. Step-down from Box, Jump Up Stand on a box or bench with feet at shoulder width, knees bend, and spine erect. Step off the bench and land with bend knees. Upon landing, immediately jump up using both legs and arms. © 2007 Thomas Fahey

20 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Permission Required for Reproduction or Display. Ski Box Jumps Stand on a box or bench. With feet together, jump up vigorously to the side, land on the ground, then immediately jump to the side to the other bench. Reverse directions, jumping to the ground and to the bench. © 2007 Thomas Fahey

21 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Permission Required for Reproduction or Display. Medicine Ball Catch Stand with feet shoulder width apart and hold the ball with both hands at chest level. Vigorously press the ball overhead with both hands until it flies into the air straight above. Use your legs to help push the ball overhead. Catch the ball with both hands, then immediately throw the ball into the air again. Repeat. © 2007 Thomas Fahey

22 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Permission Required for Reproduction or Display. Medicine Ball Catch with Partner Stand with feet shoulder width apart and hold the ball with both hands at chest level. Vigorously push the ball with both hands until it flies into the air straight toward your partner. Partner catches the ball with both hands, then immediately throws the ball back. Repeat. © 2007 Thomas Fahey

23 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Permission Required for Reproduction or Display. Overhead Shot-put Throw Stand with feet shoulder width apart and place your hands under the shot at waist level. Vigorously pull the shot overhead with both hands until it flies into the air behind you. Drive vigorously with your legs and extend fully. © 2007 Thomas Fahey

24 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Permission Required for Reproduction or Display. Medicine Ball Sit-ups Spotter stands 3-5 feet from the person doing the sit-ups. At the top of the sit-up, the person tosses the ball to the spotter, then completes a sit-up without the medicine ball. He or she returns to the top of the sit-up and catches the ball that was thrown by the spotter. Sequence: Sit-up with ball, throw ball to spotter, sit-up without ball, catch ball from spotter, repeat. © 2007 Thomas Fahey

25 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Permission Required for Reproduction or Display. Sprint Starts; “On Your Marks” Feet are staggered inches apart, with front foot placed approximately 20 inches from the starting line. Try to relax in this position © 2007 Thomas Fahey

26 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Permission Required for Reproduction or Display. Sprint Start: “Set” Raise back and hips. Front leg bends about 90° and rear leg 120°. Right-handed people usually start with left foot forward. Back is flat, and hips are slightly higher than the shoulders. Contact the ground with fingertips, which raises shoulders as high as possible. Don’t put too much weight on fingertips. © 2007 Thomas Fahey

27 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Permission Required for Reproduction or Display. Sprint Start: “Go!” Raise shoulders to direct force through the length of the body. Drive the front leg fully so that the body forms a straight line from through the hip to the heal. Push the ball of the rear foot hard against the block as you drive the opposite knee forward. The arm on the side of the pushing leg drives straight forward, while the other arm drives straight backward. Both arms are bent approximately °. Try to extend fully with your hips and knees and use your arms dynamically during the driving phases of the movement. © 2007 Thomas Fahey

28 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Permission Required for Reproduction or Display. Harness and Sled Pulling Harness sprinting builds leg and core strength. Wear a harness around your waist and pull a weight sled, or truck tire. Run up hill or add weight for more resistance. Vary the speed and resistance -- the more resistance, the slower the speed and vice versa. Develop functional strength by also carrying heavy rocks or wearing a backpack. © 2007 Thomas Fahey

29 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Permission Required for Reproduction or Display. Running Stadium Stairs Find safe, study stairs and run to the top. Variations: run every other stair, hopping up the stairs using one or two legs, or ski hopping from side-to-side. Be very careful going down the stairs, particularly if you have kneecap problems. © 2007 Thomas Fahey

30 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Permission Required for Reproduction or Display. High Knee, Fast Arms Simulating a sprint motion in a nearly stationary position, pump your arms and lift your knees as fast as possible. Try to complete 20 strides in only 10 yards. Begin with 3 repetitions (3 sets of 10 yards). Progress to repetitions. © 2007 Thomas Fahey

31 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Permission Required for Reproduction or Display. Bounding Strides Do this exercise on a grass field or running track over a distance of yards. Stride as long as possible, moving your arms vigorously in synchrony with your legs. Your strides should resemble bounding jumps. Begin with 2-3 repetitions and progress to 10 repetitions. © 2007 Thomas Fahey

32 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Permission Required for Reproduction or Display. Basic Weight Training Exercises to Develop Speed and Power Chapter 11


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