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The ‘Other’ RtI: Response to Gifted & Talented Instruction 1 Jackie Drummer Ruth Robinson Board Members & Past Presidents Wisconsin Association for Talented.

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Presentation on theme: "The ‘Other’ RtI: Response to Gifted & Talented Instruction 1 Jackie Drummer Ruth Robinson Board Members & Past Presidents Wisconsin Association for Talented."— Presentation transcript:

1 The ‘Other’ RtI: Response to Gifted & Talented Instruction 1 Jackie Drummer Ruth Robinson Board Members & Past Presidents Wisconsin Association for Talented & Gifted www.watg.org

2 And Who Are You? Your name, position & district... Where are you in the RtI process? One thing you want to take away from this workshop... 2

3 3 The Why Behind RtI... or... Doing RtI for All the Right Reasons Questions to ask about RtI: What is the fundamental purpose of our school/s? What knowledge and skills will our children need to be successful adults? What must we do to make learning a reality for every student every day? Austin Buffum, Mike Matos & Chris Weber, Educational Leadership, October 2010

4 RtI is only meant for Special Education Fact or Fiction? 4 Website resources for support National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) Council for Exceptional Children-Talented & Gifted Wisconsin RtI Center within the Department of Public Instruction Wisconsin Association for Talented & Gifted

5 5 The process of RtI is meant to encourage greater collaboration between regular education special education & gifted education

6 Wisconsin’s View FACT Wisconsin explicitly defines RtI as a process for helping all students reach higher levels of academic and behavioral success. 6

7 7 RtI Principles and Implications for Serving the Needs of Gifted Students from Claire E. Hughes, Karen Rollins, and Mary Ruth Coleman, RtI for Gifted Students: CEC-TAG Educational Resource; Prufrock Press 2011

8 8 The RtI Principle Traditional Gifted Education Gifted Education Within Rt I Tiered system of interventions The more intense the needs, the more intense and long-term the instructional intervention and the more different the learning environment; many “one-size fits all” programs vs. services Scaffolding support that starts with differentiation in Tier I, targeted support for strengths in Tier II, and individualized supports in Tier III (formal identification may take place here)

9 Universal Screening Level 3 Level 2 Tier 2 Tier 3 In AdditionInstead of District Curriculum Tier I and Level 1 “All” students experience differentiated lessons Tier 2 9 © Robinson & Kueht 2008

10 10 RtI Principle Traditional Gifted Education Gifted Education Within RtI Early interventionSupporting learners in the general education program, with formal identification at grades two or three Recognizing ability within a nurturing system regardless of label and providing early support to develop potential for all learners

11 11 RtI PrincipleTraditional Gifted Education Gifted Education Within RtI Universal Screening Establishing scores that students would reach in order to be placed in the “talent pool” Establishing scores that students would reach that indicate a need for differentiated and advanced instruction

12 12 RtI Principle Traditional Gifted Education Gifted Education Within RtI Fidelity of intervention Reviewing and evaluating programming to examine parental and student satisfaction and effectiveness of program Reviewing and evaluating programming to ensure that the student actually receives instruction geared to his/her particular needs— not a “one-size fits all” program; using student outcome data to show that growth has taken place

13 13 RtI Principle Traditional Gifted Education Gifted Education Within RtI Progress Monitoring Using some pre- assessment and curriculum compacting to allow students to show mastery Documenting student progress with a goal of providing the appropriate level of instruction to match the student’s strengths, interests and pace of learning

14 14 RtI PrincipleTraditional Gifted Education Gifted Education Within RtI Professional Development Providing specific, research- based interventions that are appropriate for the needs of the child Providing specific strategies of acceleration, enrichment, and differentiation that are effective with gifted learners

15 15 RtI PrincipleTraditional Gifted Education Gifted Education Within RtI Collaborative Structure Collaborating when needed and when time permits Collaborating between gifted, special and general education teachers to identify and serve high achieving students in need of differentiated services; providing greater opportunities for twice-exceptional students

16 16 RtI Principles Traditional Gifted Education Gifted Education Within RtI Parental Involvement Sharing information with and from families to look at achievement levels and effectiveness of interventions Collaborating with families to look at achievement levels and effectiveness of interventions; building targeted interventions based on information regarding each student’s interest areas and areas of strength

17 Wisconsin’s Concept Graphic for RtI 17

18 National Center on RtI Graphic 18

19 19

20 Samples of Tier One Academic Options Under RtI Classroom differentiation Cluster Ability Grouping Thinking Skills Learning Centers & Activities based on interest 20

21 Samples of Tier Two Academic Interventions Pull-out options that relate to talents & abilities Compacting and contracting Resource Teachers & Resource Materials Flexible Grouping Honors & Advanced Placement & Seminars Co-curriculars & extra-curriculars 21

22 Samples of Tier Three Academic Interventions Differentiation Education Plans (DEP) Mentorships Internships Independent Research Radical Acceleration Early Entrance at any level 22

23 Samples of Tier One Behavioral Interventions for Gifted Students School-wide Counseling Building self-awareness Metacognitive Strategies Career & College Readiness and Planning starting as early as possible, but no later than fifth grade 23

24 Samples of Tier Two Behavioral Interventions for Gifted Students Group Counseling regarding gifted issues (stress, perfectionism, multi-potentiality, asynchronous development, over- excitabilities, etc.) Social skills training Leadership training Self Advocacy 24

25 Samples of Tier Three Behavioral Interventions for Gifted Students Intensive and individual counseling May require outside services 25

26 Samples of Tier One Coaching Support for Teachers & Administrators of Gifted Students Support in differentiation of content, process and product Coaching around the emotional needs of gifted learners in the regular classroom Coaching parents around the needs of gifted students (SENG) 26

27 Samples of Tier Two Coaching Support for Teachers & Administrators of Gifted Students Continued coaching... higher level differentiation strategies cluster grouping and flexible grouping structures & schedules that recognize gifted students emotional needs of gifted students working with parents of gifted students 27

28 Samples of Tier Three Coaching Support for Teachers & Administrators of Gifted Students Coaching to recognize when additional help, resources or outside counseling are needed Coaching around writing and managing a DEP ( Differentiated Educational Plan) Coaching parents about additional high level resources (WCATY, NUMATS, Online Learning) 28

29 Outcomes for Gifted in RtI  RtI supports and gives value to regular formative assessments to inform instructional practice.  Increased academic achievement is expected and measured. 29

30 Growth to Standards Approach 30

31 Policy Implications for Gifted Education & RtI - Elissa F. Brown & Susan H. Abernathy, Chapter 5 in RtI for Gifted Students; Prufrock Press 2011 Early identification policies for nurturing potential in all Early identification policies for historically under-represented populations (culturally, linguistically, economically disadvantaged and twice-exceptional) Off-level testing for highly gifted Matching service delivery to identification 31

32 More Policy Implications for Gifted Education & RtI - Elissa F. Brown & Susan H. Abernathy, Chapter 5 in RtI for Gifted Students; Prufrock Press 2011 Evaluation/accountability to monitor delivery & fidelity of service Teacher development, licensure and professional development Involving parents in developing and revising local gifted education plans 32

33 RtI & Gifted Education Resources http://www.dpi.state.wi.us/cal/gifted.html 1. Gifted Child Today Summer 2009 Issue 2. DPI MediaSite presentation 3. PowerPoint slides included in the presentation. 4. Key Characteristics of Gifted Education Plans 33

34 Gifted Child Today Summer 2009 34

35 Contents 35 Dr. Chrystyna Mursky, Wisconsin’s Educational Consultant for Advanced Placement & Gifted/Talented Education, is one of the authors of this article.

36 Montana Office of Public Instruction A user friendly 55-page Plan & Resources is available from the Montana Office of Public Instruction. Gifted Education is addressed in Montana’s document also.55-page Plan & Resources 36

37 Further Information... National Center on Response to Intervention They do not explicitly address gifted, however, there are other resources available about RtI. University of Iowa – Dr. David Lohman Find Dr. Lohman under “Staff” and click on his link to find assessment articles. Especially look for those discussing establishing ‘local norms’ for under-represented populations. 37

38 Further Information  Removing the Mask: Gifted in Poverty by Paul Slocumb & Ruby Payne Removing the Mask: Gifted in Poverty by Paul Slocumb & Ruby Payne  2e Newsletter 2e Newsletter  Dr. Donna Ford: Closing the Achievement Gap Dr. Donna Ford: Closing the Achievement Gap 38

39 Words to Grow By.... 39

40 Questions? 40


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