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Work/Life Issues and Interdisciplinary Mentoring Lehigh University April 18, 2014 Gail Gasparich, Ph.D. Cynthia Simpson, M.Ed.

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Presentation on theme: "Work/Life Issues and Interdisciplinary Mentoring Lehigh University April 18, 2014 Gail Gasparich, Ph.D. Cynthia Simpson, M.Ed."— Presentation transcript:

1 Work/Life Issues and Interdisciplinary Mentoring Lehigh University April 18, 2014 Gail Gasparich, Ph.D. Cynthia Simpson, M.Ed.

2  Identify the steps and incentives to retain women at every step of the STEM career pathway  Stimulate institutional policies that transform all sectors of the STEM workplace Why??

3  Work/life integration challenges are worldwide  Family-friendly policies, effective mentoring, and work/life programs make a difference What do we know?

4 How do we know?  Largest survey ever of working scientists  4225 individuals from 115 countries  30% of respondents were women

5 How often do work demands conflict with personal life demands?

6 Work demands conflict with life demands at least 2x per week

7 What is your attitude toward stress at work?

8 The Leaky Pipeline

9 Insert the presenter slides here My institution is family-friendly

10 The need for work/life programs and family friendly policies  Men as well as women in the STEM workplace struggle with career and family obligations.  STEM careers are “family unfriendly”  Of researchers intending to leave their current job, 64% are leaving for reasons other than promotion and advancement.

11 There is sufficient support for my partner/spouse at my institution. % of individuals who disagreed/strongly disagreed with this statement: Male: 28.7% Female: 30.6% Approaches to Work Life Issues

12 There is sufficient support for my partner/spouse at my institute 12 Reasons for disagreeing… There is not policy for spousal/family support Funding cuts/ limited funding for spousal support Low salary Only healthcare support available for spouse Other than placing my spouse on my health care plan, my spouse does not exist in the eyes of the institute. Arts and Humanities, USA, 36-45, Male, Married/Partnered Reasons for agreeing… Institute has a spousal hire policy Flexible working hours (family friendly) Spouse included in benefits plan Spouse is employed at same institute There is not a policy for supporting family members at my institution. Biochemistry, Genetics, and Molecular Biology, Brazil, 46-55, Male, Married/Partnered There is no support for partners/spouses per se. For example, I have to travel extensively for my work and have to pay out of pocket to cover child support while my partner/spouse is working. Biological Sciences, USA, 46-55, Female, Married/Partnered In general including me, the salary of Japanese academia is lower than that of business persons even in research field. Chemical Engineering, Japan, 36-45, Male, Married/Partnered My wife is chair professor and I work in industry in the same field, her institute has granted me visiting scientist status so we can work together 24 hours a day. Other subject, USA, 56-65, Male, Married/Partnered I can include my spouse on my benefits, Social Science, USA, 26-35, Female, Married/Partnered My wife does not require any support from the institute, and I have the flexibility to be at home when she needs my support. Computer Sciences / IT, USA, 26-35, Male, Married/Partnered My spouse was part of the universities spousal hire program. Neuroscience, USA, 36-45, Female, Married/Partnered Lack of funds for spousal accommodations due to the budget cuts/economic downturn. Environmental Sciences, USA, 36-45, Female, Married/Partnered She has got a permanent position in the institute. That's good. Biological Sciences, Italy, 36-45, Male, Married/Partnered

13 Empowering the individual...  AWIS has fostered mentoring and networking strategies for individuals for over 40 years  AWIS developed a very successful work/life satisfaction program with Elsevier Foundation funding

14 Mentoring and networking

15 Implications for Institutions Balance, satisfaction, integration, flexibility... the tug of war between the demands of the workplace and workers’ private lives

16 BUT empowering the individual is not enough... Institutions need to be aware of the concerns of the early and mid-career workforce BECAUSE individual empowerment tools will not resolve all the issues.

17 The core issues  Workers’ career and life concerns  Outmoded workplace policies  Institutional responsibility

18 Implications for Institutions  Effective mentoring strategies and programs  Explicit family friendly policies  Dual career couples  Childcare, dependent, and elder care

19

20 Models of Success Drexel School of Medicine’s Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) Program – focuses on preparing senior women faculty to move into positions of institutional leadership to effect positive change Georgia Tech ADVANCE – Six team members track data concerning hiring and advancement, analyzes faculty work-life needs and initiatives, and sponsors faculty development programs UC Davis School of Medicine Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women’s Health (BIRCWH) – Implementing a career development program to provide mentored Ph.D and M.D. faculty with multidisciplinary training to ensure career success and to nurture non-traditional interdisciplinary collaborations

21 University of Michigan ADVANCE – Institutional transformation and timeline for change. Findings: – Climate change took a long time ( ) – Persistent programmatic efforts designed to change routine practices were implemented – Required policy changes including expansion of child care and dual career resources, family-friendly policies, and regular reporting on faculty diversity – There was an institutional commitment from top leadership Slides from the presentation by Abby Stewart during 2014 NSF ADVANCE Program can be found at https://c.ymcdn.com/sites/awis.site- ym.com/resource/resmgr/ADVANCE_14/Keynote_-_Stewart.pdf Models of Success

22 The Mentoring Skill Model Mentee- Specific Skills Shared Skills From The Mentor’s Guide (Revised Edition) © 2003 by Linda Phillips-Jones, Mentor- Specific Skills Acquiring mentors Learning quickly Showing initiative Following through Managing relationships Listening actively Identifying goals ¤t reality Building trust Encouraging Inspiring Providing corrective feedback Managing risks Opening doors Instructing/ Developing capabilities

23 Mentoring Outreach The mentor as an inspiring figure  Generates opportunities  Provides possibilities  Indicates paths But does not determine the direction to choose – they give the individual the power of decision

24 Benefits for the Mentor  Personal satisfaction  Personal growth through the establishment of a human relationship  Exposure to new disciplines  Network growth  Establishment of new professional collaborations  Transcendence via the Multiplicative Effect

25 The Multiplicative Effect  The mentoring relationship provides mutual satisfaction. When the relationship has been successful, both parties feel comforted and experience a deep sense of gratitude.  Experiencing gratitude generates a desire to return it to someone else. They, in turn, will experience it and will do the same. That is the essence of the multiplicative effect.

26 The Multiplicative Effect  The outreach is incommensurable  The ability of outreach from those that have had a previously favorable relationship is massive  The critical point that supports the continued success of the mentoring effort

27 Mentoring Outreach A community of individuals that has received successful mentoring has:  Maturity  Dialog  Potential to progress  Positive attitude  Ethics  Vision  Decision  Organizational skills  Creativity  Collaboration (intra and inter)  A sense of purpose

28 Discovery is main reason for undertaking research 85% Work I am doing is making a difference to society 67% Satisfied with my career opportunities63% I am happy with my work-life balance58% Comfortable saying no to projects that are not considered a priority 53% At work there are others to whom I can delegate tasks 46% Ensuring I have good work-life balance negatively impacted career 32% Sufficient support for partner/spouse at institute 33% Delayed having children in order to pursue career in research 31% Considering moving to another country to further career 26% Overview: Attitude to work-life effectiveness 28 % Strongly agree/ agree Q2. To better understand your attitudes towards scholarly publishing please indicate how much you agree or disagree with: Work-life balance is more of an issue for females than males. For all four statements females are less positive. Being satisfied with the impact of your research and career opportunities is more closely linked to age than other personal attributes, though females are slightly less satisfied with their career opportunities than males. Delaying having children and considering moving abroad are closely linked to age and marital status (young and single more likely to agree). There is also a gender difference in that females are less likely to consider moving and more likely to delay having children in order to pursue a career in research. Being satisfied with the impact of your research and career opportunities is more closely linked to age than other personal attributes, though females are slightly less satisfied with their career opportunities than males. Work-life balance is more of an issue for females than males. For all four statements females are less positive. Delaying having children and considering moving abroad are closely linked to age and marital status. Females are less likely to consider moving and more likely to delay having children in order to pursue a career in research.

29 Female researchers less positive about work-life balance and impact on career I am happy with my work-life balance Ensuring I have a good work-life balance has negatively impacted my career n=4225 n=857 n=2385 n=927 n=2945 n=1223 n=1915 n=2176 n=541 n=3364 n=174 n=4225 n=857 n=2385 n=927 n=2945 n=1223 n=1915 n=2176 n=541 n=3364 n=174 Of those with children: 46% females and 33% males agreed Of those with children: 46% females and 33% males agreed Significant difference between subset and total

30 30 There is sufficient support for my partner/spouse at my institute I am considering moving to another country to further my career in research I have delayed having children in order to pursue my career in research n=4225 n=857 n=2385 n=927 n=2945 n=1223 n=1915 n=2176 n=541 n=3364 n=174 n=4225 n=857 n=2385 n=927 n=2945 n=1223 n=1915 n=2176 n=541 n=3364 n=174 Attitudes to work-life effectiveness: by age, gender, whether have children and marital status n=4225 n=857 n=2385 n=927 n=2945 n=1223 n=1915 n=2176 n=541 n=3364 n=174 Significant difference between subset and total

31 Implications for Institutions Experimental efforts recognized best practices new norms

32 Implications for Institutions  Individual determination not enough  There must be a commitment from all stakeholders to lead the change

33 Conclusion Institutions who resist tailoring the workplace to retain the best workers of both genders will be increasingly unable to compete effectively in a global marketplace.

34 Future AWIS Webinars April 28 New Federal Policies Supporting the Family Friendly STEM Workplace May 5 Dual Career Solutions: Successful Recruitment and Retention Strategies June 18 Writing Retreats for Career Success

35 Association for Women in Science 1321 Duke Street Suite 210 Alexandria, VA


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