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Stanford University, Fall 2002 ED 225x - Persuasive Technology in Education www.captology.org Me-Go Chika Ando, Andrea Kulkarni, Ken Rafanan, Lori Takeuchi.

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Presentation on theme: "Stanford University, Fall 2002 ED 225x - Persuasive Technology in Education www.captology.org Me-Go Chika Ando, Andrea Kulkarni, Ken Rafanan, Lori Takeuchi."— Presentation transcript:

1 Stanford University, Fall 2002 ED 225x - Persuasive Technology in Education Me-Go Chika Ando, Andrea Kulkarni, Ken Rafanan, Lori Takeuchi Slide #1 Me-Go A conceptual captology design by Chika Ando, Andrea Kulkarni, Ken Rafanan, and Lori Takeuchi Design Challenge To design a mobile phone application that effectively motivates young students to achieve their goals. Time limit: 12 hours per person

2 Stanford University, Fall 2002 ED 225x - Persuasive Technology in Education Me-Go Chika Ando, Andrea Kulkarni, Ken Rafanan, Lori Takeuchi Slide #2 Me-Go Persuasive Purpose Persuade middle school aged kids to live a healthy lifestyle. Foster enjoyment of exercise and help youngsters make the connection between exercise and good health. Motivate kids to develop good eating habits and help kids make the connection between diet and good health.

3 Stanford University, Fall 2002 ED 225x - Persuasive Technology in Education Me-Go Chika Ando, Andrea Kulkarni, Ken Rafanan, Lori Takeuchi Slide #3 User Description Middle school children in general who do not pay attention to their healthy lifestyle They are likely… Ages Using computer at school or home Parents also have an access to the Internet

4 Stanford University, Fall 2002 ED 225x - Persuasive Technology in Education Me-Go Chika Ando, Andrea Kulkarni, Ken Rafanan, Lori Takeuchi Slide #4 Features on wireless phone Synchronous voice communication Asynchronous text messaging Input what they eat Input exercise they do Pedometer functionality Clock Synchronize with a server GPS

5 Stanford University, Fall 2002 ED 225x - Persuasive Technology in Education Me-Go Chika Ando, Andrea Kulkarni, Ken Rafanan, Lori Takeuchi Slide #5 To begin with A user sets his weight, height, ideal sleeping time and “fitness challenge”, his target steps. Daily Eat a meal and input what he eats on the phone. Pedometer counts the number of steps a user walks and inputs other exercise manually. The condition of users is synchronized with avatars on the virtual playground on the server. All kids can look at them and observe the condition of friends. Features/Functionality

6 Stanford University, Fall 2002 ED 225x - Persuasive Technology in Education Me-Go Chika Ando, Andrea Kulkarni, Ken Rafanan, Lori Takeuchi Slide #6 Ideation Snapshots Storyboards Brainstorming

7 Stanford University, Fall 2002 ED 225x - Persuasive Technology in Education Me-Go Chika Ando, Andrea Kulkarni, Ken Rafanan, Lori Takeuchi Slide #7 Ideation - Character Exploration

8 Stanford University, Fall 2002 ED 225x - Persuasive Technology in Education Me-Go Chika Ando, Andrea Kulkarni, Ken Rafanan, Lori Takeuchi Slide #8 A Week in the Life with Me-Go Four other kids on Aditya’s Me-Go Team also use Me-Go to record their diet and exercise activity. At any point in the day, Aditya can view who’s walked the most steps so far today. Avatars representing other teammates appear on Aditya’s Me-Go when they are walking and their pedometers are engaged. On Saturday, Aditya logs onto to see how well he met his fitness goals for the week. He also compares his teammates’ performance against his own. On Sunday evening, Aditya visits on his home computer to enter in his weekly diet and exercise goals. This week, Aditya decides to limit his junk food intake to three servings, and walk at least one mile per day. Pizza or turkey sandwich for lunch? Aditya chooses the pizza, which he enters into his Me-Go. Mrs. Johri tracks her son’s entries from work, and calls Aditya to discuss his decision to eat pizza. Before lunch tomorrow, Me-Go will conveniently remind him to think twice about ordering pizza again. A built-in pedometer tracks Aditya’s steps all day long. Aditya also enters the half-hour of soccer practice he had after school and the two extra flights of stairs he climbed between second and third periods into Me-Go. At the end of each week, the team is awarded points for cumulative achievement among members. The goal is to outscore other Me-Go teams around the country. The Web site keeps records of past scores so that Aditya can track progress of both team and individual performances over the long run.

9 Stanford University, Fall 2002 ED 225x - Persuasive Technology in Education Me-Go Chika Ando, Andrea Kulkarni, Ken Rafanan, Lori Takeuchi Slide #9 Prototype of Me-go

10 Stanford University, Fall 2002 ED 225x - Persuasive Technology in Education Me-Go Chika Ando, Andrea Kulkarni, Ken Rafanan, Lori Takeuchi Slide #10 Features/Functionality Fitness challenge and feedback Once a day, the server sends a health tip of the day and feedback analysis to a kid and his parents. A user sets fitness goals daily and weekly. A teacher provides physical activities or periodical events or competition to the class. Parents work and discuss with kids about their progress, or share the healthy lifestyle through having meals and exercise together.

11 Stanford University, Fall 2002 ED 225x - Persuasive Technology in Education Me-Go Chika Ando, Andrea Kulkarni, Ken Rafanan, Lori Takeuchi Slide #11 Features/Functionality Eat Walk/ Exercise Action Input Kids/ Parents Pedometer/ manual input Server Calculate/ Analysis Feedback Kids Teacher Parents

12 Stanford University, Fall 2002 ED 225x - Persuasive Technology in Education Me-Go Chika Ando, Andrea Kulkarni, Ken Rafanan, Lori Takeuchi Slide #12 Theoretical Justifications Kairos: Me-Go identifies opportune moments to guide kid to make healthy decisions Convenience: Kids can enter in diet and exercise data on the spot Social Facilitation: Avatars and ability to view teammates’ step counts encourage kids to perform target behaviors Social Comparison: At Web site, kids can compare own performance with peers Intrinsic Motivators: –Competition: Kids compete to see who can walk the most steps –Cooperation: As a team, kids work together to beat other Me-Go teams, or to simply outscore their own team records –Recognition: Individuals and teams are publicly rewarded before the nationwide Me-Go community for meeting/exceeding goals

13 Stanford University, Fall 2002 ED 225x - Persuasive Technology in Education Me-Go Chika Ando, Andrea Kulkarni, Ken Rafanan, Lori Takeuchi Slide #13 User Testing Subjects –two seventh grade girls –neither owns a mobile phone but have friends who do Primary questions –Would a cartoon character avatar be persuasive? –Do middle scholars set nutritional and fitness goals? Secondary Questions –What rewards would be motivating? –What types of messages would be persuasive?

14 Stanford University, Fall 2002 ED 225x - Persuasive Technology in Education Me-Go Chika Ando, Andrea Kulkarni, Ken Rafanan, Lori Takeuchi Slide #14 User Testing Results Character –Rejection of our Me-Go character –Use of real people either parents or celebrities would be effective in encouraging and scolding users into action Goals –While these two middle scholars try to eat right, they do not set goals centred around nutrition –Confirmation of our guess that middle scholars do form goals around fitness Message –Negative reinforcement especially from authority figure would work even if automated Rewards –Subjects preferred rewards of games, music, and money

15 Stanford University, Fall 2002 ED 225x - Persuasive Technology in Education Me-Go Chika Ando, Andrea Kulkarni, Ken Rafanan, Lori Takeuchi Slide #15 Shortcomings of Design Many middle scholars do not have mobile phones. Current design assumes adequate signal coverage. Need for user input of food intake reduces convenience and increases potential for error on exact food intake. Also causes need for user training. Need for user input of exercise information reduces convenience and increases potential for error. Also causes need for user training. Users may be tempted to cheat to succeed.

16 Stanford University, Fall 2002 ED 225x - Persuasive Technology in Education Me-Go Chika Ando, Andrea Kulkarni, Ken Rafanan, Lori Takeuchi Slide #16 Expansion - What else is possible? Other form factors or ID possibilities –Food intake information input – system accepts information directly from school cafeterias as well as restaurants to automatically feed information on the specific meals ordered to the user's database. –Food intake information input – Alternatively, system could incorporate a camera and image recognition system to see what the user has on her/his plate before and after eating to calculate the calories consumed. –Exercise information input – take physical activity information directly from user's body by constantly measuring the heart rate. This information could be combined with smart scale readings of body weight and body fat to arrive at a fairly accurate reading of daily caloric use. Other features and interactions –Proactive encouragement of exercise opportunities. System informs user when physical activity of interest is available. For example, “a pick-up basketball game is forming at your local gym” or “the park next to you has a highly rated two mile hike.”

17 Stanford University, Fall 2002 ED 225x - Persuasive Technology in Education Me-Go Chika Ando, Andrea Kulkarni, Ken Rafanan, Lori Takeuchi Slide #17 Next Steps in Design Process Ethnographic study of target group to gather better information on habits and behaviours Development of prototypes for more extensive user testing to test hypotheses and guide further product development –Testing audio and visual messages for persuasiveness –Identify input method for optimal convenience –Build out web interface Begin discussions with potential telecom partners to identify salient technical and business requirements Identify appropriate opportunities for cross-marketing (e.g. sport apparel)

18 Stanford University, Fall 2002 ED 225x - Persuasive Technology in Education Me-Go Chika Ando, Andrea Kulkarni, Ken Rafanan, Lori Takeuchi Slide #18 Me-Go Summary Goal: Promote healthy lifestyle for middle school students Medium: mobile phone delivery of persuasive application making links between diet, exercise and good health apparent Methods: Kairos principle, Convenience, Social Facilitation, Social Comparison Room to Grow: future product iterations increase Me-Go’s effectiveness as both an educational tool and a business platform

19 Stanford University, Fall 2002 ED 225x - Persuasive Technology in Education Me-Go Chika Ando, Andrea Kulkarni, Ken Rafanan, Lori Takeuchi Slide #19 Evaluation of Captology Design Project How well does the design idea fit into the realm of captology? How well does the design match the design brief? How viable/convincing is the proposed solution?

20 Stanford University, Fall 2002 ED 225x - Persuasive Technology in Education Me-Go Chika Ando, Andrea Kulkarni, Ken Rafanan, Lori Takeuchi Slide #20 Evaluation continued… How effectively did the presentation communicate? How well does the document communicate? Bonus Points How clever/insightful is the proposed solution?


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