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Chapter 2 ©2010  Worth Publishers Economic Models: Tradeoffs and Trade Slides created by Dr. Amy Scott.

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter 2 ©2010  Worth Publishers Economic Models: Tradeoffs and Trade Slides created by Dr. Amy Scott."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter 2 ©2010  Worth Publishers Economic Models: Tradeoffs and Trade Slides created by Dr. Amy Scott

2 TUNNEL VISION A miniature airplane sitting motionless in a wind tunnel isn’t the same thing as an actual aircraft in flight. But it is a very useful model of a flying plane. Economic theory consists mainly of a collection of models. In this chapter, we will look at two economic models that illustrate why such models are so useful.

3 1.Why models in economics? 2.Three simple but important models: A.Production possibility frontier B.Comparative advantage C.Circular-flow diagram 3.Positive economics and normative economics. 4.When economists agree and why they sometimes disagree. Chapter Objectives

4 Models in Economics  A model is a simplified representation of a real situation - used to better understand real-life situations.  Models play a crucial role in economics  Used to study a real but simplified economy Ex.: Cigarettes as currency in World War II prison camps  Used to simulate an economy on a computer Ex.: Use Tax models to study impact of proposed study  The “other things equal” (ceteris paribus) assumption means that all other relevant factors remain unchanged.

5 Models for Money  An economic model can be worth quite a bit of money. Global Insight, the world’s biggest consulting firm, uses economic models to predict future trends and give advice to firms and governments.  A particularly lucrative branch is finance theory which calculates what assets, such as shares in a company, are worth.  The most famous business application of finance theory was Long Term Capital Management, a fund that used sophisticated models to invest money for its wealthy clients.  The fund did well for a while, then it collapsed. People feared companies would be brought down with it but the government organized a rescue operation. A similar situation almost happened in the fall of 2008.

6 Three Models The Production Possibility Frontier  Illustrates trade-offs facing an economy that produces only two goods.  It shows the maximum quantity of one good that can be produced for any given production of the other.  The PPF improves our understanding of trade-offs by considering a simplified economy that produces only two goods by showing this trade-off graphically. What to do? Even a castaway faces trade-offs.

7 Opportunity Cost and Slope of PPF  If the tradeoff remains constant along the PPF then we say they face a Constant Opportunity Cost and the PPF has a linear slope.  If the tradeoff increases along the PPF than we say they face an Increasing Opportunity Cost and the PPF has a nonlinear slope.

8 The Production Possibility Frontier with Constant Opportunity Cost Quantity of coconuts Production possibility frontier A B D C Feasible and efficient in production Not feasible PPF Quantity of fish Feasible but not efficient

9 PPF with Increasing Opportunity Cost A PPF Producing the first 20 fish... …requires giving up 25 more coconuts… …requires giving up 5 coconuts But producing 20 more fish... Quantity of coconuts Quantity of fish

10 Economic Growth  Economic Growth is the growing ability of the economy to produce goods and services  Economic Growth can come from two sources:  Increase in Factors of Production – resources used to produce goods and services (Land, Labor and Capital)  Technological Improvement – improvement in the technical means of producing goods and services

11 Economic Growth Economic growth results in an outward shift of the PPF because production possibilities are expanded. The economy can now produce more of everything. Production is initially at point A (20 fish and 25 coconuts),  it can move to point E (25 fish and 30 coconuts). A E New PPF Original PPF Quantity of coconuts Quantity of fish

12 Production Possibilities for Two Castaways (a) Tom’s Production Possibilities Tom’s consumption without trade Tom’s PPF Quantity of coconuts Quantity of fish

13 Production Possibilities for Two Castaways Hank’s PPF Quantity of coconuts Quantity of fish (a) Hank’s Production Possibilities Hank’s consumption without trade

14 Tom and Hank’s Opportunity Costs Tom’s Opportunity Cost Hank’s Opportunity Cost One fish3/4 coconut2 coconuts One coconut 4/3 fish1/2 fish

15 Specialize and Trade  Both castaways are better off when they each specialize in what they are good at and trade.  It’s a good idea for Tom to catch the fish for both of them, because his opportunity cost of a fish in terms of coconuts not gathered is only 3/4 of a coconut, versus 2 coconuts for Hank.  Correspondingly, it’s a good idea for Hank to gather coconuts for the both of them. His opportunity costs is less, only 1/2 of a fish to 4/3 fish for Tom.

16 Comparative Advantage and Gains from Trade (a) Tom’s Production and Consumption Tom’s consumption without trade 30 Tom's PPF Hank's PPF Quantity of coconuts Quantity of fish Tom’s consumption with trade Tom’s production with trade (b) Hank’s Production and Consumption Hank’s production with trade Hank’s consumption with trade Hank’s consumption without trade

17 How the Castaways Gain from Trade Both Tom and Hank experience gains from trade:  Tom’s consumption of fish increases by two, and his consumption of coconuts increases by one.  Hank’s consumption of fish increases by four, and his consumption of coconuts increases by two.

18 Comparative vs. Absolute Advantage  An individual has a comparative advantage in producing a good or service if the opportunity cost of producing the good is lower for that individual than for other people.  An individual has an absolute advantage in an activity if he or she can do it better than other people.  Having an absolute advantage is not the same thing as having a comparative advantage. You can have an absolute advantage in both goods and still benefit from trade.

19 Tom vs. Hank – Absolute vs. Comparative  Tom has an absolute advantage in both activities: he can produce more output with a given amount of input (in this case, his time) than Hank.  But Tom can indeed benefit from a deal with Hank because comparative, not absolute, advantage is the basis for mutual gain.  So Hank, despite his absolute disadvantage, even in coconuts, has a comparative advantage in coconut gathering.  Meanwhile Tom, who can use his time better by catching fish, has a comparative disadvantage in coconut- gathering.

20 Comparative Advantage and International Trade 0 1,500 1,000 Quantity of pork (millions of tons) Quantity of aircraft (a) The U.S. Production Possibilities Frontier ,000 2,000 1, U.S. PPF Canadian PPF Quantity of pork (millions of tons) Quantity of aircraft (b) Canadian Production Possibilities Frontier U.S. consumption without trade U.S. consumption with trade U.S. production with trade Canadian production with trade Canadian consumption with trade Canadian consumption without trade

21 Comparative Advantage and International Trade  Just like the example of Tom and Hank, the U.S. and Canada can both achieve mutual gains from trade.  If the U.S. concentrates on producing pork and ships some of its output to Canada, while Canada concentrates on aircraft and ships some of its output to the U.S., both countries can consume more than if they insisted on being self-sufficient.

22 Misunderstanding Comparative Advantage A common mistake is to confuse comparative advantage with absolute advantage. Ex.: U.S. vs. Japan in 1980s:  Commentators: “U.S. might soon have no comparative advantage in anything”  Wrong! They meant “absolute advantage” PITFALLS

23 Pajama Republics  Poor countries tend to have low productivity in clothing manufacturing but even lower productivity in other industries.  Comparing per capita income with the share of the clothing industry in manufacturing employment shows a strong effect.

24  Trade takes the form of barter when people directly exchange goods or services they have for goods or services they want.  The circular-flow diagram is a model that represents the transactions in an economy by flows around a circle.  Households buy goods and services from firms  Firms buy factors of production from households  Inner Flow = goods and services  Outer Flow = money Transactions: The Circular-Flow Diagram

25 The Circular-Flow Diagram Money Factors Goods and services Factors Households Firms Markets for goods and services Factor Markets Goods and services Money

26 Circular-Flow of Economic Activities  A household is a person or a group of people that share their income.  A firm is an organization that produces goods and services for sale.  The markets for goods and services is where firms sell goods and services that they produce to households.  The factor markets are where firms buy the resources they need to produce—factors of production.

27 Circular-Flow of Economic Activities  Ultimately, factor markets determine the economy’s income distribution: how total income is divided among the owners of the various factors of production.

28 Rich Nation, Poor Nation  Look at the labels inside your clothing.  Most clothing is manufactured outside of the United States.  These countries are typically much poorer than the United States usually because they are less productive- they cannot produce as much from a given quantity of resources as comparable firms in the United States.  This is ‘comparative advantage’ – they can make clothing at a lower opportunity cost than the US – while the US can make other goods at a lower opportunity cost.

29 True or False? An increase in the amount of resources available to Tom for use in producing coconuts and fish does not change his production possibility frontier. 1. True 2. False

30 True or False? A technological change that allows Tom to catch more fish for any amount of coconuts gathered results in a change in his production possibility frontier. 1. True 2. False

31 True or False? The production possibility frontier is useful because it illustrates how much of one good an economy must give up to get more of another good regardless of whether resources are being used efficiently. 1. True 2. False

32 Which country has an absolute advantage in the production of automobiles? 1. Italy 2. United States In Italy, an automobile can be produced by 8 workers in one day and a washing machine by 3 workers in one day. In the United States, an automobile can be produced by 6 workers in one day, and a washing machine by 2 workers in one day. Which country has an absolute advantage in the production of washing machines? 1. Italy 2. United States

33 Which country has a comparative advantage in the production of washing machines? 1. Italy 2. United States In Italy, an automobile can be produced by 8 workers in one day and a washing machine by 3 workers in one day. In the United States, an automobile can be produced by 6 workers in one day, and a washing machine by 2 workers in one day. Which country has a comparative advantage in the production of automobiles? 1. Italy 2. United States

34 What pattern of specialization results in the greatest gains from trade between the two countries? 1. Italy specializes in automobiles and the U.S. specializes in washing machines. 2. Italy specializes in washing machines and the U.S. specializes in automobiles. In Italy, an automobile can be produced by 8 workers in one day and a washing machine by 3 workers in one day. In the United States, an automobile can be produced by 6 workers in one day, and a washing machine by 2 workers in one day.

35 Use the Circular-Flow Diagram to determine if the statement is true or false: An increase in household spending leads to an increase in jobs in the economy. 1. True 2. False

36 Positive vs. Normative Economics  Positive economics is the branch of economic analysis that describes the way the economy actually works.  Statement of fact  ‘what is’  Normative economics makes prescriptions about the way the economy should work.  Statement of opinion  ‘what ought to be’  A forecast is a simple prediction of the future.

37 Positive vs. Normative Economics  Economists can determine correct answers for positive questions, but typically not for normative questions, which involve value judgments.  There are exceptions are when policies designed to achieve a certain prescription can be clearly ranked in terms of efficiency.  It is important to understand that economists don’t use complex models to show “how clever they are,” but rather because they are “not clever enough” to analyze the real world as it is.

38 When and Why Economists Disagree There are two main points on which economists disagree:  Which simplifications to make in a model  Values

39 When Economists Agree  “If all the economists in the world were laid end to end, they still couldn’t reach a conclusion”  A survey by the American Economic Association published in May of 1992 in the American Economic Review reported that in fact many economists do agree.  At the top, more than 90 percent of the economists agreed that tariffs and import quotas usually reduce general economic welfare.  There is a lot of common ground but also much disagreement.

40 Economists in Government  Economists play an important role in the business world and also in government.  One of their most important functions is to make economic policy.  In the United States, a key role is played by the Council of Economic Advisors.  Economists are also active in the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Federal Reserve as well as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund.

41 Which of the following statements is a positive statement? 1. Society should take measures to prevent people from engaging in dangerous personal behavior. 2. People who engage in dangerous personal behavior impose higher costs on society through higher medical costs. 3. both A and B 4. none of the above

42 1. True 2. False Policy choice A and policy choice B attempt to achieve the same social goal. Policy choice A, however, results in a much less efficient use of resources than policy choice B. Therefore economists are more likely to agree on choosing policy choice B.

43 1. True 2. False When two economists disagree on the desirability of a policy, it’s typically because one of them has made a mistake.

44 1. True 2. False Policy makers can always use economics to figure out which goals a society should try to achieve.

45 1.Almost all economics is based on models. An important assumption in economic models is the other things equal assumption (ceteris paribus), which allows analysis of the effect of a change in one factor by holding all other relevant factors unchanged. 2.One important economic model is the production possibility frontier. It illustrates: opportunity cost, efficiency, and economic growth. There are two basic sources of growth: an increase in factors of production, resources such as land, labor, capital, and human capital, inputs that are not used up in production, and improved technology. 1 of 3 Summary

46 3.Another important model is comparative advantage, which explains the source of gains from trade between individuals and countries. Everyone has a comparative advantage in something. This is often confused with absolute advantage, an ability to produce a particular good or service better than anyone else. 4.In the simplest economies, people barter or trade goods and services for one another—rather than trade them for money, as in a modern economy. The circular-flow diagram represents transactions within the economy as flows of goods, services, and money between households and firms. These transactions occur in markets for goods and services and factor markets. 2 of 3 Summary

47 5.Economists use economic models both for positive economics, which describes how the economy works, and for normative economics, which prescribes how the economy should work. Positive economics often involves making forecasts. Economists can determine correct answers for positive questions, but typically not for normative questions, which involve value judgments. 6.There are two main reasons economists disagree. One, they may disagree about which simplifications to make in a model. Two, economists may disagree—like everyone else—about values. 3 of 3 Summary

48 The End of Chapter 2 Coming attraction Chapter 3: Supply and Demand


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