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Slide 1 © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011 Galvanizing Your Campus to Go Mobile Tim Flood Stanford Mobile Program EDUCAUSE Live!  May 26, 2011.

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Presentation on theme: "Slide 1 © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011 Galvanizing Your Campus to Go Mobile Tim Flood Stanford Mobile Program EDUCAUSE Live!  May 26, 2011."— Presentation transcript:

1 Slide 1 © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011 Galvanizing Your Campus to Go Mobile Tim Flood Stanford Mobile Program EDUCAUSE Live!  May 26, 2011

2 What we’ll cover © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011 Slide 2 1.Who is driving the influx of new technologies? How does this create a ‘mobile mindset’? 2.What we are doing at Stanford? 3.How can you galvanize your campus to go mobile?

3 Who is driving the influx of new technologies? Slide 3 © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011 Consumers

4 Laptops are transitional Slide 4 the un-tethered world of mobile © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011

5 The user & ERPs ERPs usually have a different login ERPs shape their own contained world of information Our user is an administrator who is often not the end-user We design & test the User Interface (UI) based on user requirements Our designs focus on records & transactions, but this is often not the focus of end-users Therefore, our self-service capabilities are often not appreciated by our end-users The ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) system creates a certain mindset Slide 5 © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011 For example, if I am a student I just want to find a class and get into it. I am not concerned with your enrollment transaction per se. Predominant Today

6 A new model & focus Records & Transactions Service Engagement Inward facing Outward facing Administrative / ERP Focus Mobile Focus Slide 6 © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011 Vision

7 The user & mobile apps Mobile UI: often like a Venn diagram connecting multiple ERPs UI is key Great mobile designs aren’t just ERPs on a mobile device Great mobile apps entertain, inform, engage, create beauty, build loyalty, evoke feeling, engender appreciation, express humor … End-users want something ‘at hand’ in the course of their busy daily lives What are your end-users’ objectives? Can you engage end-users in design? Mobile establishes an end-user mindset For example, in iStanford you can find courses (Student), where they are held (Space), and who teaches them (Student & LDAP) Slide 7 © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011 Mobile future

8 Two mobile worlds Two ways to deliver mobile: mobile app & mobile-aware web site Will learn from each other & merge – eventually One motivator for merging is the the maintenance required to accommodate both Web sites are changing because of mobile Mobile Apps Mobil-Aware Web Sites HTML 5 © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011 Slide 8

9 Generalizations … some differences With mobile …:With traditional web / ERP …: My computer is in my pocket … I’m more connected, more available (7x24?) I’m less immediately available My choice of device and apps are a little like my choice of avatar I express myself less directly through my choice of browser or laptop My exact whereabouts in the world can be pinpointed Where I am in the world at this moment is less obvious I expect / might like a more playful experienceI expect more business-like experience More evocative of personal responseLess evocative of personal response My senses (tactile, visual, auditory, spatial …) are engaged … more like virtual reality I engage mostly the visual and auditory senses Designed for what I want as a consumer: convenience, service, experience Designed to provide what the institution needs from me I expect a more curated experienceI expect a more encyclopedic experience © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011 Two unique characters Slide 9

10 With mobile …:With the web / ERP …: Quick-in / quick-out experience, frequent oftenYou’re in until you’re done experience, frequent if I have to I’m probably multi-taskingGenerally, more sustained, focused experience The world comes to me through push technology – less browsing, more getting I go to the world through browsing I have access to digital resources when and where I want it I have access to digital resources through a web connection if I’m near my laptop I connect through an app and/or browserI connect through a browser I expect information in a simple presentationI expect that information will be presented both in simple & complex ways More brief (unless reading a book), simpler presentation, less verbose Generally more comprehensive, both simple & complex, more verbose I typically store lessI typically store more © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011 Generalizations … some differences Two unique characters Slide 10

11 A really good app A really good app on a smart phone disappears. I don’t think about it. It is simply there, an extension of me, at hand when I need it. © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011 Slide 11

12 End of Part 1 Questions so far? © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011 Slide 12 Next Section: What we are doing at Stanford?

13 What led to iStanford? Partly a response to a problem... our Student Administration System: Functions adequately as a database engine Not well received as a user interface We did not want to be constrained by an ERP... people don’t want silos Culture of high expectation Students & faculty ask...: ‘can’t you do better than this?’ April 2008 © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011 Slide 13

14 What led to iStanford? Things we observed: – Infusion of rapidly changing technologies... we loved the iPhone – Highly talented, motivated students Things we had: – Passion to improve service – Capable students (Terribly Clever Design) – Capable staff & campus partners Why not put these together? Terribly Clever Design … Blackboard Mobile in the making! April 2008 © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011 Slide 14

15 Beginning of a vision April 2008 Multiple interfaces to our administrative systems Didn’t wait for device standardization Working with students would be an advantage Acted strategically instead of creating the obligatory mobile strategy Didn’t design the User Interface ourselves -- and its all about the UI! Didn’t create help for end-users Redefined who is end-user (inclusive: students, faculty, staff, alumni, visitors, the curious) A little outside-the-box thinking came in handy © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011 Slide 15

16 April 2008 Initial thinking We wondered what end-users would find useful … our initial answer: A way to find courses A way to find your way around campus A way to find people A way to find out about athletics A way to find out what’s going on around campus Terribly Clever Design would …: contract as our vendor and create a hosted service offer same service to other campuses create a System Developers Kit (SDK) that allowed us to add our own function © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011 Slide 16

17 Events Idea of iStanford occurred Apr 2008 Proposed idea to Kayvon Beykpour, Stanford sophomore, CEO of Terribly Clever Design … got started Apple released 1 st version of iOS Jun 2008 1 st version of iStanford developed Jun-Oct 2008 News in 12 blogs within 3 hours’ appearance in App Store TCD announced winners of AT&T 2008 Big Mobile contest TCD purchased by Blackboard 2009 2008 - 2009 © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011 Slide 17

18 iStanford: Phase 1 Objective: Create a mobile breakthrough! Provide improved services to end users (students, faculty, staff, alumni, visitors) using mobile technology Initial strategy: Implemented what TCD/Bb Mobile delivered out of the box Suggested other things we wanted Relied on Bb Mobile to create two special tiles: Course Add/Drop and MyBalance Contingency: Prepared for a time when the Bb Mobile could not program just for Stanford Led to development of Bb Mobile SDK © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011 Slide 18 Apple SDKBb Mobile SDK

19 iStanford: Phase 2 & beyond Objective: Create a pleasing, unique experience for iStanford users... push the envelope... experiment The Bb Mobile SDK created the freedom and extensibility we sought Used Bb SDK to add GoTourIt, a tour capability that our Visitors Center wanted but Bb Mobile didn’t deliver These functions added significant size to iStanford Now turning more to the use of OpenURL – especially for large functional additions © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011 Slide 19

20 iStanford today Slide 20 © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011

21 Taking it further TilesProvided ByMethod AnalyticsMeLLmo (Roambi)OpenURL to app TreeviaMetaneerOpenURL to app ExploreMetaneerOpenURL to app Stanford JazzStanford Jazz WorkshopOpenURL to app eDocumentsSntial TechnologiesImbedded app? AskJaneIntelliResponseOpenURL to app Big Five EventsTBD Stanford MagazineAlumniOpenURL to app © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011 … and more! Slide 21

22 Example: Analytics (using Roambi) By MeLLmo, Inc. (San Diego) –Objective: Data visualization –Available via SDK & as stand-alone app © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011 Slide 22

23 Roambi Flow By MeLLmo, Inc. (San Diego) –Objective: Dynamic publishing of Stanford research –Magazine that can be manipulated through touch –Work with Stanford journalism students & research faculty © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011 Slide 23

24 Example: CreditU By Metaneer Labs, Inc. (Stanford grad students) –Objective: Reinforce going to class –Available via SDK & as stand-alone app © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011 Slide 24

25 Example: Treevia By Metaneer Labs, Inc. (Stanford grad students) –Objective: Learn about Stanford University in a fun way –Available via SDK & as stand-alone app © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011 Slide 25 Facts Demographics History Athletics Famous alumni Hoover Institute SLAC Sustainability The Marching Band Performing Arts ….

26 Example: Coming Soon By Metaneer Labs, Inc. (Stanford grad students) –Objective: Let people know what’s coming and advertise little- known features © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011 Slide 26

27 End of Part 2 Questions so far? © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011 Slide 27 Next Section: How can you galvanize your campus to go mobile?

28 Mobile alternatives today Three alternatives today: – Use Blackboard Mobile, or... – Use MIT Open Source, or... – Develop from scratch Bb Mobile has worked for us because: – We haven’t had to create staff of mobile developers – The ecosystem idea of flexible SDK allows us to expand and grow Mobile App Mobile Web Alternatives today: – JQuery Mobile & other tools Build prototypes: – Small tech leadership team – Goals: 8-10 demo mobile- aware web sites; models; templates; outreach to the campus web development community Both? Yes! © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011 Slide 28

29 Building a mobile culture How do you build a campus culture that embraces mobile? This is the most difficult task. Following are a few considerations that follow the be-do-have model © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011 BeDoHave Be: Develop a mobile mindset Do: Act accordingly Have: The results of acting from the mindset Slide 29

30 Stanford business unit example Business staff led this rapid deployment, often with little/no help from IT and systems Extensive use of SaaS Led to growth in technical literacy among office staff Experience greater technical literacy in their end-users Vendors prepared to help us go mobile get our business … help means: – providing mobile apps – helping us use mobile apps through XML, RSS feeds, etc – demonstrate shared commitment to our vision Vendors who don’t help us don’t get our business Three student services units at Stanford University Slide 30 © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011

31 Engaging your village! Identify & partner with like minds … go viral … it will take a village! Identify & work with interested end-users, students, faculty Work with vendors who support mobile – replace those who don’t / won’t Promote agile implementations with like-minded campus partners © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011 Slide 31 Considerations

32 Engaging management Business units: considering declaring that you are in the information business … necessitates a different way of staffing & rewarding staff Expect different things from business & tech managers … operations must be the driver for mobile Challenge outworn policies Business & tech units: declare that change is part of your way of doing business Transform manual / legacy $ into tech $ … this starts the technology wheel turning & fuels the engine of innovation © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011 Slide 32 Considerations

33 Engaging mindset Challenge perception that systems must be perfect.: excellent yes … perfect no … i.e., agile of mind, mobile in spirit Promote organizational agility Get buy-in that you are in the relationships business … mobile fosters better relationships since it focuses on the end-user Outsource all you can … do less … facilitate more Act strategically now … articulate strategic plan later … with some experience © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011 Slide 33 Considerations

34 Final consideration get started The simplest & best antidote to feeling overwhelmed by the plethora of choices that mobile technology presents is to get started “If you’re not prepared to be wrong, you’ll never be creative.” Sir Ken Robinson, PhD “If you’re not prepared to be wrong, you’ll never be creative.” Sir Ken Robinson, PhD © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011 Slide 34

35 End of Presentation Additional questions? © Leland Stanford University, Jr 2011 Slide 35 Thank you …! Student Affairs in a Digital World: Re-Thinking Higher Education Technology http://www.twflood.com Senior Technology Consultant, Stanford University Stanford Mobile Program twflood@stanford.edu President, Route 92 Consulting timflood21c@gmail.com Tim Flood


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