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V Thanks to: Daniel Currie Hall

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Presentation on theme: "V Thanks to: Daniel Currie Hall"— Presentation transcript:

1 v Thanks to: Daniel Currie Hall

2 Thanks to: Daniel Currie Hall w

3 Remind yourself about approximants: Fricatives – turbulent airflow Approximants – laminar airflow

4 Approximants laminar flow

5 Fricatives turbulent flow

6 Remind yourself about tuhe diference beteen Icelandic and English v....

7 Features: unvoiced labiodental fricative f fine, life

8 Features: voiced labiodental fricative v very clever

9 Review: f and v Labio-dental fricatives, f and v One point to remember is that the Icelandic LETTER f is often used to represent the SOUND v. This is not so in English - f is f, and v is v. So for instance the words life and live, leaf and leave, are quite different in English - remember there is a tendency in "Icelandic English" to pronounce them the same: Remember - different vowel length, too!. from web-page

10 Review: f and v Labio-dental fricatives, f and v Make sure your f is unvoiced. Another point to remember is that English v is a much STRONGER sound than Icelandic v, which often almost disappears in words like próf and prófa. English v is LABIO-DENTAL: bottom lip FIRMLY against top teeth. Keep the top lip out of the way, otherwise you'll make it sound like w And make sure you're not losing it in words like over and clever. from web-page

11 Back to w... w is a bilabial approximant with secondary velar articulation. Icelanders have problems distinguishing between v and w. There is no w in Icelandic, and yet, to English ears, Icelanders always seem to have w in words like 'very', 'revolve'. Why is this? from web-page

12 Back to w... English v is a much STRONGER sound than Icelandic v - it's a fricative, while Icelandic v is an APPROXIMANT, like English w English v is LABIO-DENTAL (bottom lip agains top teeth: show your top teeth!) while w is BILABIAL (both lips). from web-page

13 Back to w... w has secondary velar articulation - while the lips are making the 'w' shape (rounding), the back of the tongue is making a velar approximant - vey much like the g in 'ógurlega'. from web-page

14 v Thanks to: Daniel Currie Hall

15 Thanks to: Daniel Currie Hall w


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