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1. 2 Action Plan Objectives Increase pressure at the political level to secure the immediate release of all hostages being held by pirates Review and.

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Presentation on theme: "1. 2 Action Plan Objectives Increase pressure at the political level to secure the immediate release of all hostages being held by pirates Review and."— Presentation transcript:

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2 2 Action Plan Objectives Increase pressure at the political level to secure the immediate release of all hostages being held by pirates Review and improve the IMO guidelines to Administrations and seafarers and promote compliance with industry best management practices and the recommended preventive, evasive and defensive measures should follow Promote greater levels of support from, and coordination with, navies Promote anti-piracy coordination and co-operation procedures between and among States, regions, organizations and industry Assist States to build the capacity of States in piracy-infested regions of the world, and elsewhere, to deter, interdict and bring to justice those who commit acts of piracy and armed robbery against ships; and Provide care for those attacked or hijacked by pirates and for their families

3 Piracy Snapshot

4 Ratio of successful attacks versus attacks reported Since August 2008 where approximately 50% of attacks were successful, on a 12 month rolling average the pirate success ratio has been reduced to its current level of below 20% The figures for the first six months of this year (187 attacks leading to 22 hijacks) indicate that 88% of attacks are being defeated, largely by proper application of BMP3 On 1 January 2011 there were 28 ships and 656 seafarers being held. At the official launch of the Action Plan on 3 March 2011, this had risen to 30 ships and 714 seafarers. At present (20 July) there are 22 ships and 464 seafarers being held, a significant reduction, but indicative that the situation is far from acceptable. 4

5 Seafarers captured and in captivity

6 Ships attacked and captured 2011 Monsoon Period 6

7 EUNAVFOR – Observed Compliance with BMP3 Oct-Dec 10Jan 11Feb 2011Mar 11 Apr 11 Total number of observed ships Number of ships which were non compliant with BMP Ratio of BMP3 non compliant ships ,5 7

8 Registrations with MSCHOA 8

9 Concerns Pirates: –More aggressive tactics –More violent attacks –Bolder and larger attacks –Better organized 9

10 Repercussions of alternative routes Cape of Good Hope extra mileage to run (almost double that for a typical voyage) time increase of the same voyage by almost 12.5 days at a speed of 15 knots (thus delaying the replenishment of Europe and the Americas in energy stocks); an additional need for some 750 tonnes of fuel per ship and an additional volume of some 2,335 tonnes of CO2 emitted from the additional fuel burnt; possible increase in freight rates which could more than double if all ships were deviated around the Cape, subsequently settling at about 25 to 30% higher; and economies and the consumer would eventually be hurt. 10

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12 Action Plan Objectives Increase pressure at the political level to secure the immediate release of all hostages being held by pirates Review and improve the IMO guidelines to Administrations and seafarers and promote compliance with industry best management practices and the recommended preventive, evasive and defensive measures should follow Promote greater levels of support from, and coordination with, navies Promote anti-piracy coordination and co-operation procedures between and among States, regions, organizations and industry Assist States to build the capacity of States in piracy-infested regions of the world, and elsewhere, to deter, interdict and bring to justice those who commit acts of piracy and armed robbery against ships and Provide care for those attacked or hijacked by pirates and for their families 12

13 Actions taken by IMO Djibouti Code of Conduct Support to SOS Guidance Improvements to piracy reporting Long Range Identification and Tracking 13

14 Current IMO Guidance Resolution A.1025(26) on Code of Practice for the Investigation of the Crimes of Piracy and Armed Robbery against Ships SN.1/Circ.281 on Information on internationally recommended transit corridor (IRTC) for ships transiting the Gulf of Aden MSC.1/Circ.1333 on Recommendations to Governments MSC.1/Circ.1334 on Guidance to ship-owners and Ship operators and crews MSC.1/Circ.1337 on Best management practices to deter piracy off the coast of Somalia and the Arabian Sea Area (BMP3)) Model Course 3.23 on Actions to be taken to prevent acts of piracy and armed robbery Circular letter No

15 Outcomes of MSC 89 Outcomes of MSC 89 Guidance on Privately Contracted Armed Security Personnel Resolution on use of BMP guidance Guidelines on Collection of Evidence 15

16 IMO guidance - firearms and private security IMO does not endorse carriage of firearms by seafarers, or the use of privately contracted armed security personnel on board ships Current guidance is contained in MSC.1/Circs and 1334 New interim recommendations and guidance (MSC.1/Circs and 1406) do not change IMO’s position on the use of armed personnel: Seafarers should not be armed and the carriage of PCASP remains a matter of decision for the ship owner, after a thorough risk assessment, to request and the Flag State to decide. 16

17 PCASP – The Way Forward Implications of PCASP for port and coastal States to be considered by the FAL Committee (FAL 37) 5-9 September 2011 Meeting of Working Group 3 of the CGPCS to discuss PCASP guidance 12 September at IMO HQ Intersessional MSC Working Group on Maritime Security including Piracy and Armed Robbery against Ships (MSPWG) September

18 Contact Group on Piracy off the coast of Somalia IMO is an active member of the CGPCS and its working groups: –CGPCS Plenary –WG 1: Military and operational coordination, information sharing and capacity building –WG 2 : Legal issues –WG 3 : Shipping self awareness and capabilities –WG 4 : Communications and key messages –WG 5 : Financial aspects of piracy NEW 18

19 Review of National Legislation –Naval action alone insufficient –Need for effective legal framework –IMO Circular letter requesting information on national legislation 19

20 Review of National Legislation -44 States have submitted information on national legislation -Inadequacies include: UNCLOS definition of piracy not fully incorporated concept of universal jurisdiction missing piracy not made separate criminal offence 20

21 Review of National Legislation –national legislation made available on DOALOS website –key element for successful prosecution of piracy identified and circulated to IMO Member States –responsibility for enacting legislation rests with governments 21

22 Which court should exercise jurisdiction? –3 reports: 2010 UNSG report containing options for the creation of special courts in the region 2011 report of the UN Special Adviser (Lang Report), narrowing down these options - favours concept of “Somalization” of prosecution June 2011 UNSG report: - focussing on establishment of Specialized Somali anti- piracy courts 22

23 WG2 of the Piracy Contact Group –established 2009 –provides specific, practical guidance to CGPCS on legal issues related to prosecution and punishment of pirates –8 meetings to date 23

24 WG2 of the Piracy Contact Group –Issues discussed include: provision of adequate national procedures on prosecution related issues; legal aspects of post-trial transfers; criminalization of possession of piracy-related equipment; ways of improving collection and sharing of data from piracy incidents; human rights issues; and private armed guards. 24

25 WG2 of the Piracy Contact Group –Future work includes: analysis of court decisions on human rights and criminal law issues; post-trial transfer arrangements – legal aspects; methods for obtaining statistics on numbers of prosecution and on numbers of pirates released without prosecution; legal aspects of air transfers arrangements; legal issues regarding use of private armed guards; and legal issues regarding piracy financiers and leaders operating offshore. 25

26 Djibouti Code of Conduct Membership Adopted in January 2009, the Djibouti Code of Conduct welcomed its 18th Signatory State with the signature of the United Arab Emirates on 18 April 2011 during the Dubai Conference. 26

27 CountryDate of the Signature 1 Djibouti29 January Ethiopia29 January Kenya29 January Madagascar29 January Maldives29 January Seychelles29 January Somalia29 January United Republic of Tanzania29 January Yemen29 January Egypt 1 October Comoros23 November Sudan 1 December Saudi Arabia10 March Mauritius23 March Jordan 20 May Oman29 July Eritrea26 November United Arab Emirates18 April 2011 Djibouti Code of Conduct List of Signatory States 27

28 Djibouti Code Signatory States 28

29 Djibouti Code of Conduct Capacity Building is based upon 4 pillars: –Information sharing –Regional Training –National legislation –Operational capacity building 29

30 Djibouti Code of Conduct Information Sharing Centres (ISCs) –Sana’a Regional Maritime Information Sharing Centre operational from February 2011 –Mombasa and Dar es Salaam ISCs declared operational in March 2011 –Entire regional web-based information sharing network equipped and operational by end June

31 Djibouti Code of Conduct 31

32 Training: –IMO is funding the building of a regional training centre in Djibouti (DRTC) –IMO is running training for all 21 States across all aspects of the capacity building pillars 32

33 Djibouti Code of Conduct Training –Regional Training Centre Building: Memo of Understanding between IMO and Djibouti for transfer of $2.5m in building funds signed in May 2011 Site clearance has commenced First funds for building: release imminent 33

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36 Djibouti Code of Conduct Djibouti Regional Training Centre (DRTC) –Training needs analysis completed for DRTC –Meeting of Djibouti Code States in May 2011 adopted framework resolution covering: Mission and TORs DRTC Regional training coordination process Programme of training for DRTC for next 12 months 36

37 Djibouti Code of Conduct Legal –Review of national laws is ongoing with an emphasis on establishing if a law to counter piracy exists and is enforceable by a States maritime law-enforcement force –Training for regional Ministries of Justice and sea- going law-enforcers in the ROE and procedures for a piracy arrest ongoing in co-operation with UNODC 37

38 Djibouti Code of Conduct Other projects: –Provide communications equipment and a jetty in Seychelles –Work with UNODC and UNDP to establish a legal framework for, and commence training of a Somaliland Coastal Monitoring Force scheduled for late 2011 –Partner for counter-piracy training through TRADE process (NATO) tying regional operational capacity to international naval operations 38

39 Djibouti Code of Conduct Maritime Situational Awareness –Link Tanzanian Navy radars and AIS to Dar es Salaam ISC in cooperation with USN – in progress Contract for partner programme in Kenya has commenced –Fuse Yemen VTS and AIS pictures into Yemen ISC and link to Djibouti AIS system to give Gulf of Aden coverage –Longer term – fuse all AIS and coastal radars into a common picture 39

40 Future Once a common picture is being shared it requires sea- going law-enforcement forces to use the information to detect and disrupt pirates, and protect friendly shipping Thus a regional approach is required to benefit from this regional picture –IMO is doing background work with East African Standby Force Maritime Force (EASF MARFOR) to establish maritime security as a strategic objective under a single regional command structure. –IMO has increased the momentum for operational Coast Guard function training earmarking $5m in funds for 2011/

41 Future IMO’s maritime situational awareness concept is based upon a practical approach to: –link and share regional maritime data –establish regionally co-operating sea-going law- enforcement forces –Train regional staff to a common standard all set within a legal framework to counter piracy through national updating of piracy law, and the bringing together of all agencies responsible for devising, enforcing and prosecuting that law. 41

42 Vision Through the Djibouti Code of Conduct IMO is seeking to give ownership for countering piracy back to regional States 42

43 QUESTIONS? 43


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