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Developing an Outline How to Create the Structure of Your Research Paper.

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Presentation on theme: "Developing an Outline How to Create the Structure of Your Research Paper."— Presentation transcript:

1 Developing an Outline How to Create the Structure of Your Research Paper

2 Introduction-Section I I. Introduction A. Interest-grabber B. General Background Information C. Transition from background to thesis— making the topic more specific D. Thesis Statement

3 II. Concession Paragraph By explaining the opposition’s argument, the author anticipates any objections to his/her argument By explaining the opposition’s argument, the author anticipates any objections to his/her argument Demonstrates that the author has considered both sides of the issue Demonstrates that the author has considered both sides of the issue Re-asserts the author’s main point Re-asserts the author’s main point The author actually strengthens his/her own essay by admitting the strengths of the opposing argument The author actually strengthens his/her own essay by admitting the strengths of the opposing argument

4 II. Definition Paragraph Can be used in lieu of a concession paragraph Can be used in lieu of a concession paragraph Provides a simple explanation of a central concept of the essay Provides a simple explanation of a central concept of the essay Can establish background information Can establish background information Can explain a key term Can explain a key term Answers a key question that the reader might have Answers a key question that the reader might have

5 Body-Outline Sections III-V III. Main Idea 1 A.Support 1 1.Comment 2.Comment B.Support 2 1.Comment 2.Comment C. Transition Sentence to Main Idea 2 ***Anytime you see the word “support,” it means a quote, paraphrase, or summary***

6 Body-Outline Sections III-V IV.Main Idea 2 A.Support 1 1.Comment 2.Comment B.Support 2 1.Comment 2.Comment C. Transition Sentence to Main Idea 3

7 Body-Outline Sections III-V V.Main Idea 3 A.Support 1 1.Comment 2.Comment B.Support 2 1.Comment 2.Comment C.Transition Sentence to Conclusion

8 Conclusion-Outline Section VI VI. Conclusion A. Summarize your main points B. Draw a conclusion C. Application / further questions / something to think about

9 Introduction-Section I I. Introduction A. “Had you rather Caesar were living, and die all slaves, than that Caesar were dead, to live all freemen?” (Julius Caesar III.ii.24-6) B. Caesar’s triumphant return to Rome C. Caesar’s rise to power inspired both reverence and jealousy D. The murder of Caesar was not a blow for freedom carried out by populists, but a bloody assassination carried out by aristocrats who feared the loss of the power they carried as senators.

10 Concession Paragraph II. Many believe that Caesar’s murder was a blow for democracy A. “As he was ambitious, I slew him” (Brutus in Julius Caesar III.ii.28) 1. Shakespeare shows Brutus as an honest man who truly believed in the republic 2. This play has spawned centuries of viewing Brutus as a hero B. “What made Caesar most openly and mortally hated was his passion to be made King” (Plutarch) 1. Shakespeare used Plutarch as his source, so naturally he would agree 2. Historians for years viewed Caesar as a tyrant C. In reality, Caesar was trying to bring peace to a turbulent period in Roman history. His intentions were benevolent, not tyrannical.

11 Body-Outline Sections III-V III. Caesar was a man of the people A. Caesar established a huge public works program that created jobs for the growing class of freemen (McCoubrey). 1. He was genuinely concerned about the common people 2. He could have passed legislation that was more self- serving B. Caesar left “to every several man, seventy-five drachmas” (III.ii.256) 1. Even Shakespeare has to admit that Caesar’s will was generous 2. This legacy only further proves that Caesar truly had the people’s interests at heart C. Along with his concern for the people, Caesar also was concerned with bringing peace to a turbulent Rome

12 Body-Outline Sections III-V IV. Pompey’s military and domestic policies were ruining Rome A. After Julia’s death, Pompey made ostracizing Caesar the main goal of his administration (Bertinelli) 1. Caesar’s daughter linked the two men 2. Once that link was broken, Pompey became paranoid about Caesar’s growing popularity B. “While instituting legal and military reorganization and reform, Pompey also passed a law making it possible to be retroactively prosecuted for electoral bribery—an action correctly interpreted by Caesar's allies as opening Caesar to prosecution once his imperium was ended” (Goldsworthy) 1. Pompey was purposefully provoking Caesar 2. He was concerned less with Rome than with maintaining power C. Just as Pompey’s main focus was holding on to power, so too was Brutus’ and Cassius’.

13 Body-Outline Sections III-V V. Brutus and Cassius, far from striking a blow for freedom, were actually striking a blow for self-interest. A. Brutus showed a knack for switching sides (Smith 2) 1. He once was an enemy of Pompey, yet joined with him against Caesar 2. He later accepted Caesar’s pardon, and was made governor of Gaul B. Pompey saved “Cassius from being brought to trial by his enemies for extortion in Syria” (Cribbs 78) 1. Even Shakespeare says that Cassius had “an itching palm” 2. Cassius was a supreme opportunist who used Brutus’ as a shield to maintain his rank and power. C. His enemies intentions clear, it is obvious that Caesar was not the tyrant he is painted out to be.

14 Conclusion—Part VI VI. Conclusion A. Caesar was a man of the people, while Pompey, Brutus, Cassius, and their ilk were often power- hungry aristocrats. B. Certainly Caesar was ambitious, but his intentions were obviously for the good of Rome, while the intentions of those who opposed him were often for their own self-interest C. Often, the public perception of a person is incorrect, and can, as in this case, lead to years of disaster, conflict, and death.

15 General Points to Remember Use complete sentences Use complete sentences A number or letter precedes each heading and is followed by a period or is enclosed in parentheses A number or letter precedes each heading and is followed by a period or is enclosed in parentheses The first word in every heading begins with a capital letter The first word in every heading begins with a capital letter Headings are indented appropriately Headings are indented appropriately No 1s without 2s and no As without Bs No 1s without 2s and no As without Bs

16 Building Your Argument Organize your points logically—take care as to which are your strongest points and which are your weakest. Organize your points logically—take care as to which are your strongest points and which are your weakest. Make sure EVERYTHING you say in support of your argument is supported by outside evidence (textual references) Make sure EVERYTHING you say in support of your argument is supported by outside evidence (textual references) Cite all textual references (whether direct quote, paraphrase, or summary) in your outline (name of author/source, page number) Cite all textual references (whether direct quote, paraphrase, or summary) in your outline (name of author/source, page number)


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