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AFRC Table of Content Unit Orientation AFRC Unit Participation Administrative Actions Control Roster The First Sergeant Position Enlisted Promotion Administrative.

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Presentation on theme: "AFRC Table of Content Unit Orientation AFRC Unit Participation Administrative Actions Control Roster The First Sergeant Position Enlisted Promotion Administrative."— Presentation transcript:

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2 AFRC Table of Content Unit Orientation AFRC Unit Participation Administrative Actions Control Roster The First Sergeant Position Enlisted Promotion Administrative Demotions Administrative Separations Authorized/Unauthorized Absences Personnel Evaluations Change Management Security Forces Procedures Line of Duty Employers Support of the Guard and Reserve Diversity OSI

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4 COGNITIVE SAMPLES OF BEHAVIOR: Give a new example of effective unit orientation. Describe a practical commander’s call. Explain the importance of the sponsorship program.

5 Overview  Sponsorship Program  Base Orientation  Unit Orientation  AFRC

6 MP 1: Sponsorship Program  Inbound Personnel  Unit Allocation  INTRO Program

7 MP 2: Base Orientation  Wing Commander or Representative  Inspector General  Staff Representatives

8 MP 3: Unit Orientation  Unit Commander or Representative  Mission and Objectives  First Sergeant  Senior ART  OIC/NCOIC  Training Monitor  CSS

9 MP 3: Unit Orientation  Immediate Supervisor  Mission and Objectives  Duty Hours  Lunch Hour  Duty Tasks  Training  Safety  Coworker Introductions

10 AFRC 4 th Air Force – focus specifically on global reach (tankers and airlift capabilities). 10 th Air Force – strike, ISR, space, cyber, and special operations assets. 22 nd Air Force – tactical airlift, combat support, training.

11 A IR F ORCE R ESERVE C OMMAND

12 MP2: FIRST SGT ROLE

13 Summary Sponsorship Program Base Orientation Unit Orientation AFRC

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16 COGNITIVE SAMPLES OF BEHAVIOR: Comprehend policy the policy of AFI Vol. 1, 2 & 3. Clarify requirements for unit participation Explain the difference between satisfactory and unsatisfactory participation. Explain the importance of the First Sergeants responsibilities.

17 Overview:  Satisfactory Participation  Nonparticipation  Types of Participation  Telecommuting  Points Accumulation  First Sergeant Responsibility

18 AFI VOL 1 Reserve Personnel Participation; VOL 2 Reserve Personnel Training VOL 3 Reserve Personnel Telecommuting/ Advance Distributed Learning (ADL) Guidelines

19 – Military standards of dress and appearance – Physical fitness requirements – Medical standards and qualifications – Perform 48 paid Training Periods per year (TP) – Perform at least 14 AT per year SATISFACTORY PARTICIPATION IS NOT THE SAME AS A GOOD YEAR! 50 POINTS IS JUST A BI-PRODUCT OF PARTICIPATING Requirements For Satisfactory Participation?

20 Excused Absence Unexcused Absence Constructively Present

21 Initial Active Duty Training (IADT) Unit Training Assembly (UTA) Equivalent Training (ET) RMP Additional Flying Training Period (AFTP) Additional Ground Training Period (AGTP) Annual Tour (AT) Active Duty for Operational Support (ADOS) Progression Tours Active Duty for Training (ADT) Tours

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24  Airmen are subject to the UCMJ  Must meet all participation requirements  Approval Authority – NAF/Wing/Group CC or Designees  Authority concurrence prior to performing telecommuting  Should not use for formal training  Written Agreement  Approving Authority  Supervisor

25 Earning Points: – Maximum Training Periods(TP) per FY is 48 points for a satisfactory year. – Must perform at least 14 Training days (AD), Maximum in FT is 15 days. NAF/CC may authorize up to 20 days. – 1 point for each 4 hours of Inactive Duty Training (IDT) not to exceed 2 per day and 1 point for each day of Active Duty – 1 point for each 3 hours of awarded ECI courses (15 max) – Max earnings 365 creditable points (366 for a leap year) per year

26 Meet and Greet Review Unit Absentee Report Oversee commander’s program Lead by example Ensure the integrity of the unit You are the model

27 Summary: Satisfactory Participation Nonparticipation Types of Participation Telecommuting Points Accumulation First Sergeant Responsibility

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30 COGNITIVE SAMPLES OF BEHAVIOR: Explain the purposes/uses of administrative reprimands. Describe the purposes/uses of unfavorable information files (UIF). Explain the purposes/uses of control rosters. Describe the first sergeant responsibilities in the administrative actions process. Describe administrative action process. Predict the effect of corrective actions on unit personnel.

31 Reference: AFI Unfavorable Information File (UIF) Program REFERENCES

32 OVERVIEW  Purpose  Counseling's, Admonishments and Reprimands  Unfavorable Information File  Control Roster  Responsibilities

33 PURPOSE Purpose is to “improve, correct, and instruct subordinates who depart from standards…on or off duty, and whose actions degrade the individual and unit mission.” -AFI

34  Counseling  Admonishments  Reprimands MP2. Administration Counseling

35 MP 2 PROCEDURES AND FORMAT  Privacy Act  PIF/UIF/’Desk Drawer’  Format

36 MP3 Unfavorable Information File  AF Form 1058  AF Form 1137  Commander’s Actions  Member’s Actions

37 MP4 MANDATORY/OPTIONAL ENTRIES -UIF  Mandatory  Table 2.2 AFI  Optional  Table 2.2 AFI

38 MP5 DISPOSITION/REMOVAL  AFI , Table 2.2  Disposition Determined By Type Of Document Filed In UIF  Early Removal  Limitations On Removal

39 MP6 UIF CAREER IMPACT No Mandatory Limitations

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41 MP1 DEFINITION AND PURPOSE “Rehabilitative tool used by commanders at all levels to set a 6-12 month observation period for individuals…who fail to meet or maintain AF standards of conduct…on and off duty.” --AFI

42 MP2 ESTABLISHING CONTROL ROSTERS  Procedures  AF Form 1058  AF Form 1137  Commander’s Actions  Member’s Actions

43 MP3 REMOVAL ACTIONS  Automatically 2400 on the last day of the designated period (Up to 12 calendar months)  Early Removal

44 MP4 CONTROL ROSTER IMPACT  EPR  Promotion  Reenlistment  PCS/PCA  Formal Training

45 MP5 RESPONSIBILITIES  Commanders  First Sergeants  Supervisors  UIF Monitor

46 SUMMARY Purpose Counseling/Reprimands UIF CR Responsibilities

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49 COGNITIVE SAMPLES OF BEHAVIOR: 1. Recognize the historical importance of the first sergeant. 2. Identify the evolvement of the Air Force First Sergeant. 3. State the traditional qualities of a first sergeant. 4. Identify the responsibilities of a first sergeant. 5. Know the role of a of a first sergeant. 6. Understand how the core values relate to the first sergeant position.

50 OVERVIEW  History  Roles and Responsibilities  Air Force Core Values

51 OVERVIEW  OUR STARTING POINT  REVOLUTIONARY WAR  DUTIES  CHANGES,  COL CHARLES A. ROMEYN  1947-PRESENT

52 OUR STARTING POINT  THE FIRST SERGEANT HAS ALWAYS HELD A HIGHLY VISIBLE AND DISTINCTIVE, ALBEIT NOTORIOUS, POSITION IN THE MILITARY UNIT.

53 OUR STARTING POINT  Roman Legion Centurions  First mention of soldiers responsible for disciplining troops  Lead soldier for 100 men  Carried unit’s legions on long poles called standards  Final defenders of legion’s standards during battle  Conduit between officers and enlisted

54  17 th Century Prussian Army Feldwebel  Overseer of enlisted personnel  Assigned at company level  Knowledgeable of duties  Accountability of people  Continuity of company commander  Authorized to use cane to instill discipline  How are first sergeants viewed today? OUR STARTING POINT

55 REVOLUTIONARY WAR  General Washington: Battled with unit ineffectiveness / desertion  General Baron Von Stuben of Prussian Army  Tactics in training and drill  Required high degree of discipline  Task given to first sergeant  Company first sergeant  “Blue Book of Regulation”

56 REVOLUTIONARY WAR  “Blue Book of Regulations”  Duties / responsibilities of company members  Key personnel  Names, height, jobs, addresses of personnel

57 DUTIES  Original First Sergeant Duties  Maintain duty roster  Take daily orders  Complete morning roster  Be acquainted with all personnel  Be available  Maintain company’s descriptive books

58 CHANGES OF  Wore red sash around the waist  New pay scale – $15.00/month  Sgt. Majors, Quartermaster Sergeants, & Chief Musicians received $16/month  1847– authorized chevrons on jacket and wear of the lozenge (diamond) on the insignia

59 COL CHARLES A. ROMEYN  Requirements of the “Best First Sergeant”  Sobriety  Loyalty  Always on the job!  Knowledge of paperwork  Physically active  Sympathetic & tactful  Marksman & horsemanship

60 CHANGES FROM 1947 TO PRESENT  1947– formal position and AFSC (731X0) vs. rank  E-6 and above could hold position  1960 – AFSC changed to / opened to all AFSC’s  1971– only E-7’s, FSA optional  1985– mandatory completion of FSA  Graduates prior to 03A can stay indefinitely  2002– officially became a special duty

61 Roles and Responsibilities Expeditionary Leader Advisor to the Commander Sets the example

62 Roles and Responsibilities Your position as the unit First Sergeant will give you an extreme amount of authority and you must be careful how you use it.

63 Air Force Core Values Integrity First – Willingness – Courage – Honesty – Responsibility – Accountability – Justice – Openness – Self-respect – Humility

64 Air Force Core Values Service Before Self – Rule following – Respect for others – Discipline and self control – Faith in the system

65 Air Force Core Values Excellence in All We Do – Product/service excellence – Personal excellence – Community excellence – Resource excellence – Operational excellence

66 "If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader“ John Quincy Adams

67 Summary History Roles and Responsibilities Air Force Core Values

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70 COGNITIVE SAMPLES OF BEHAVIOR: Be able to compute when an individual is ready for promotion Demonstrate how the promotion process works Be able to show the difference between eligible and deserving

71 OVERVIEW  Promotion Authority  Ineligible for Promotion  Minimum Eligibility Requirements  Types of Promotions  Promotion Process  First Sergeant’s Role

72 REFERENCES  AFI , Airmen Promotion Program Chapter 4 applies specifically to Reservists  AFI , The First Sergeant  AFI , The Enlisted Force Structure

73 MP1 Promotion Program Objectives “The Air Force must be able to identify those people with the highest potential to fill positions of increase grade and responsibility.” AFPD 36-25

74 MP2 Promotion Authority  Amn – MSgt Unit Commander  SMSgt – CMSgt Wing Commander or detached Group Commander

75 MP3 Ineligible for Promotion  A member in training status code “T” is ineligible  An EPR that is a referral or a rating of a 2 would render a member ineligible, unless a new EPR is written with at least an overall rating of a 3  A referal EPR do to a Fitness Test Failure  1 year from the date of a court martial order or the longest period of punishment renders a member ineligible  The member is blocked for promotion  The airman does not meet the requirements of Table 4.2, eligibility requirements

76 Promotion to Grade of:PAFSCTime in Grade (See Note 14) Enlisted Service (See Note 15) Satisfactory Service (See Note 16) AmnNot Required6 months (from IADT) Not Applicable A1CNot Required6 months (From IADT) Not Applicable SrA3-skill level8 monthsNot Applicable1 year SSgt (See Note 10) 5-skill level, or a 3-skill when a 5-skill does not exit in AFSC 12 monthsNot Applicable4 years TSgt7-skill level18 monthsNot Applicable5 years MSgt (See Note 11) 7-skill level24 months8 years SMSgt (See Note 12) 7- or 9-skill level24 months10 years11 years CMSgt9-skill level24 months10 years14 years MP4 Minimum Eligibility Requirements for Promotion

77 MP5: Types of Promotions Unit Vacancy Promotion Extended Promotion Program (EPP) Promotion Enhancement Program (PEP)

78  Promotions occur monthly  Personnel must meet the eligibility criteria outlined in AFI , Table 4.2 prior to the first day of the promotion cycle  Individuals moved to slots being vacated by someone retiring, separating, HYT or reassignment, cannot be promoted until the promotion cycle after the incumbent’s has physically departed Unit Vacancy

79 Extended Promotion Program  EPP was implemented to allow the promotion of those SSgt’s with extended time in grade and time in service to be promoted to TSgt without being assigned to a valid vacant position effective 1 Dec 97  Allows for promotion to TSgt individuals in an E6/E5 position that are blocked for promotion under unit vacancy and are not an overage (do not own the slot) have commanders approval  Applies to Air Reserve Technicians (ART’s) and Traditional Reservists who meet eligibility criteria and have commanders approval  No current UIF or Control Roster  Meets all requirements of AFI , Table 4.2, excluding unit vacancy

80 PROMOTION ENHANCEMENT PROGRAM (PEP) Reference: AFI (Table 4.2), 22 AF/CCC Memo dated 30 October 2001 General Overview: Eligibility: Meet requirements for promotion according to AFI , Table 4.2 Be blocked from promotion under Unit Vacancy Promotion Program Can only be promoted one grade higher than unit manning document (UMD) position to which currently assigned Recommended by unit commander Meet the Fitness Requirements Must not be in an overage on the UMD Must not have any unexcused absences

81 MP6: Promotion Process 1. MPF identifies airmen eligible for promotion every month (Table 4.2, eligibility requirements) and forwards an eligibility rooster to the unit commander before each UTA the month preceding the month the promotion is to be effective. 2. The unit commander processes the eligibility roster prior to the UTA completion, lining through names of airmen not recommended and annotating a period of ineligibility not to exceed 6 months.

82 PERSONAL DATA - PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 (USC 552a) UNIT: 123 AERIAL PORT SQ FFLHB0 PAS: W52PFLHB WESTOVER AFB MA RESERVE AIRMEN PROMOTION ELIGIBILITY ROSTER PROMOTION MONTH: JUL THE FOLLOWING PERSONNEL, YOUR UNIT, MEET ALL THE REQUIREMENTS OF AFI , TABLE 4.2, FOR PROMOTION TO THE NEXT HIGHER GRADE. REQUEST YOU REVIEW THIS LISTING AND MAKE YOUR ANNOTATIONS FOR NONRECOMMENDATIONS THEN FORWARD TO THE MPF. NAME GR-CURR PAFSC PAY-DT PME-1ST AUTH-GRD SSAN DOR CAFSC SAT-SVC PME-2ND POSN-NR EPR EFF-DT DAFSC RR--YY PME-3RD FAC UNEXCUSED EXCUSED WMP-STAT TNG_STAT ART MIGALA, LINDSAY CA SSG 2T SEP TSgt MAR T B-13 APR APR T H R BOUCHARD, JOHN MSGT 2T SEP SMSGT MAR T B-13 APR APR T H R I CERTIFY THAT THE INFORMATION LISTED IS TRUE AND CORRECT. I FURTHER CERTIFY THAT ALL PERSONNEL NOT RECOMMENDED HAVE BEEN ANNOTATED ACCORDINGLY. Michael R Bellerose 25JUN07 SIGNATURE OF UNIT COMMANDER DATE Until further review is made, member is ineligible until 01AUG07

83 MP6: Promotion Process 3. Complete the AF Form 224 in duplicate (mandatory for promotions to SMSgt and CMSgt) for Wing Commanders approval 5. Forward the roster, RSC and the AF Form 224 to the MPF by the end of the UTA. 4. The Unit prepares a Reserve Service Commitment (RSC) Contract on personnel being recommended for promotion to MSgt/SMSgt/CMSgt. Must have two years retainability.

84 Ineligibility Roster PERSONAL DATA - PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 (USC 552a) UNIT: 123 AERIAL PORT SQ FFLHB0 RESERVE AIRMEN PROMOTION INELIGIBILITY ROSTER PROMOTION MONTH: JUL NAME PAFSC DOR TNG-ST ASG-GR+1 PME1 PAY-DT GRD ART SSAN DAFSC POSN-NR FAC AUTH-GRD PME2 TEMSD 2AFSC SAT SVC UNEXC WMP PME3 EPR UIF CNTL-RSR ART BENTLEY, EDNA TERI 2T MAR-04 R 37 Q 13-DEC-84 TSG T H X B INELIGIBLE REASON: UMD-OVERAGE PME NO-VACANCY BIZA, STEPHANIE LYN 2T JAN-06 R APR-05 SRA T J INELIGIBLE REASON: PME

85 MP7: FIRST SGT ROLE

86 1.2. The first sergeant is responsible for providing sound advice to the commander on a wide range of topics including the health, esprit de corps, discipline, mentoring, well being, career progression, recognition, and professional development of all assigned enlisted members. AFI

87 first sergeant’s primary responsibility is to maintain a mission-ready enlisted force First Sergeants. First sergeants are specially selected SNCOs freed from operational and production requirements to provide a dedicated focal point for enlisted issues within their units. First sergeants derive their authority from the unit commander and exercise general supervision over all assigned enlisted personnel. At home station or deployed, a first sergeant’s primary responsibility is to maintain a mission-ready enlisted force. AFI

88 SUMMARY Promotion Authority Ineligible for Promotion Minimum Eligibility Requirements Types of Promotions Promotion Process First Sergeant’s Role

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91 COGNITIVE SAMPLES OF BEHAVIOR: Paraphrase the objective of administrative demotions. Defend the reasons for an administrative demotion. Explain demotion procedures/individual rights.

92 OVERVIEW  Policy  Authority  Reasons for Demotions  Demotion Process  Grade Demotions  Appeal Process

93 MP1 Purpose Ensure personnel are fully qualified to serve in their current grade and position. Peter Principle: States that people are promoted to their level of incompetence.

94 Policy:  AFI “Airman Promotion/Demotion Programs” (31 Dec 09)  AFPD “Military Promotion & Demotion  Administrative in nature  Apply to members in grades of E-2 to E-9  Not used in place of UCMJ actions MP1 Purpose

95 Policy:  Give opportunity to overcome deficiencies  Do not demoted Airmen who have separated  Sec of AF may direct demotions  Cannot be suspended  Once initiated, cannot be reassign  Do not reassign in lieu of demotion MP1 Purpose

96 MP2 Demotion Authority  Amn - MSgt >>> SPCMA Commander  SMSgt - CMSgt >>> AFRC/CV  Voluntary >>> Wing DP

97 MP2 Demotion Authority  Individual Mobilization Augmentees >>> Commander of MAJCOM, FOA, DRU  Non-pay Program Reservists >>> ARPC/CC  Selected Reserve Program >>> HQ ARPC/DR

98 MP3 Reasons for Demotions  Student Status Termination  Skill level  Failure to participate  Failure to fulfill NCO responsibilities  Physical condition/body fat standards  Reorganization  Failure to qualify for duty  Voluntary change of assignment

99 Involvement  Immediate commander  Individual  Military Personnel Flight (MPF)  Demotion Authority MP4 Demotion Process

100 Notification:  Must be in writing  State reason and facts  Member must acknowledge receipt  Appeal information provided to member MP4 Demotion Process

101 Airman in grade E-2 – E-9 Basis for demotion in current enlistment -Failure to complete training -Failure to maintain Skill/ Grade -Failure to meet NCO Responsibilities -Failure to maintain Fitness Standards -Intentional failure to qualify for duty

102 Unit CC Consults With SJA STOP PROCESS NO CC Notifies Airmen in Writing (Include a summary of basis with facts, rights to council, right to a personal hearing) YES

103 Airman responds to Commander orally, in writing, or both within 3 working days (The commander may grant an extension in writing) Notifies Airmen he/she is stopping the process. STOP CC reviews Airmen’s response to demotion. (Agrees/Disagrees) The commander notifies the airman of the decision in writing, summarizes any written or oral statements made by the airman and sends the entire case file to the servicing Military Personnel Flight (MPF) for processing. Continue Process

104 Military Personnel Flight The MPF provides the demotion package to the demotion authority (next higher level commander). The demotion authority can make additional grade reductions beyond the initiating commander’s The demotion authority approves the demotion and writes the airman’s servicing MPF to publish a demotion order. The MPF endorses the demotion authority’s memorandum and sends it to the initiating commander. Agrees The demotion authority disapproves the demotion and writes to the airman’s servicing MPF. The demotion authority notifies the MAJCOM and the airman through the initiating commander by endorsing the document. STOP Disagrees Demotion Authority The demotion authority can take additional grade reductions other than the initiating commander’s recommendation. The demotion authority requests a written legal review from the servicing staff judge advocate (SJA) before deciding the demotion.

105 Commander’s Action The commander informs the airman of the grade to which he or she is demoted, include the Date of Rank (DOR) and the demotion effective date. The commander informs the airman that he or she must acknowledge the decision within 3 working days. (May grant an extension) The commander informs the airman that he or she can appeal the demotion decision to the appellate authority (next higher level commander to the demotion authority) within 3 working days. (May grant an extension) Airmen’s Action The airman acknowledges receipt by endorsing the document including the date. Airmen is Demoted No Appeal Appeal Demotion Authority Reverses decision and restores original grade. Or demotion authority forwards case to appellate authority without comment.

106 Appellate Authority E-2- E7 Appeal to AFRC/CV E8- E9 Appeal to AFRC/CC The appellate authority approves the appeal and directs the servicing MPF to restore the airman’s grade and revoke the demotion order. Through the initiating commander, the MPF sends a memorandum telling the airman that the appellate authority approved the appeal and the airman’s previous grade was restored. Approves the Appeal The appellate authority disapproves the airman’s appeal. The servicing MPF notifies the airman in writing, via the MAJCOM and initiating commander, both of whom endorse the notice. Disapproves the Appeal

107 AIRMEN ELECTS RETIREMENT IN LIEU OF DEMOTION Airmen’s Actions The airman indicates he or she prefers to retire in lieu of demotion, provided airman is eligible for voluntary retirement. The effective date of retirement will be no later than the 1st day of the 4th month following the date the airman received the initial demotion notification. When an airman submits an application to retire in lieu of demotion, all demotion action stops until the authorities act on the retirement application. MPF Actions The MPF forwards the retirement application with a copy of the entire demotion case to HQ AFMPC/DPMARR2, 550 C Street West, Suite 11, Randolph AFB, TX, , within 5 workdays.

108 Retirement Authority Decision The demotion process continues if the authorities disapprove the application. The demotion process terminates if authorities approve the retirement application. STOP

109 Current Grade Demotion to: SRA or higher >>> A1C A1C >>> AMN AMN >>> AB Note: Demote three or more grades only when there appears no reasonable hope exists they will ever show the proficiency, leadership or fitness earned in the initial promotion. MP5 Grade Demotions

110  Must be in writing  Must be done within 30 Days  Appellate authority: – For Amn - MSgt >>> AFRC/CV – For SMSgt - CMSgt >>> AFRC/CC MP6 Appeals Process

111 SUMMARY Policy Authority Reasons for Demotions Demotion Process Grade Demotions Appeal Process

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114 COGNITIVE SAMPLES OF BEHAVIOR: Defend reasons for a voluntary separation. Explain reasons for retention beyond separation. Predict service characterization for involuntary separation. Explain when a person may request separation in lieu of court-martial action. Distinguish the reasons for involuntary separation.

115 OVERVIEW  Purpose And General Policies  Type  Service Characterizations AFI AFI Administrative Separation of Airmen Administrative Separation of Airmen

116 MP1 PURPOSE/GENERAL POLICY “The Air Force must maintain a vigorous fighting force with high standards of conduct” AFPD “Separating members failing to meet standards…promotes Air Force readiness and strengthens military service” AFI

117 MP1.1 TYPES OF ADMINISTRATIVE SEPARATIONS  Required  Voluntary  Involuntary

118 MP1.2 REASONS TO RETAIN BEYOND ETS  Make good time lost  Retention for courts-martial  Complete separation processing  Medical treatment  Foreign court disposition

119 MP2 VOLUNTARY SEPARATIONS Reasons for Separations  Reasons for Separations  Convenience of the Government (COG)  Dependency/Hardship  In lieu of courts-martial

120  Reasons  Involuntary COG  Defective Enlistments  Entry level performance or conduct  Unsatisfactory performance  Substance abuse treatment failure  Misconduct  Conditions that interfere with military service MP3.1 INVOLUNTARY SEPARATIONS

121 CBZCBZ Civilian Below the Zone

122 ADMINISTRATIVE DISCHARGE BOARDS (a fact-finding/recommending board that reviews all the information about the case)  Board entitled if:  NCO when processing starts  6 or more years TAFMS when processing starts  UOTHC characterization is recommended  In the interest of National Security MP3.2 INVOLUNTARY SEPARATIONS

123 MP4.1 CHARACTERIZATIONS  Honorable  General  UOTHC

124 NON-CHARACTERIZATIONS  Entry Level  Release from Custody and Control  Dropped From Rolls MP4.2 CHARACTERIZATIONS

125 SUMMARY Purpose/General Policies Purpose/General Policies Type Type Characterizations Characterizations

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128 COGNITIVE SAMPLES OF BEHAVIOR: Explain authorized absences as it relates to AFRC and Total Force. Distinguish authorized types of absences. Summarize the two types of passes and their limitations.

129 OVERVIEW  General Guidance  Types of Leave  Passes  Permissive TDY  Reserve Members  Unauthorized Absence  Classification (AWOL/Deserter)  Sequence of Events

130 MP1. General Guidance  Established by Congress  Unit commander’s leave policy  At least 14 consecutive days and 30 days/year  Authorized Absence  Where leave begins and ends…Local Area  Charged for duty days and non-duty days  Leave Extensions  Determining Leave or Duty Status  Examples  Recall from Leave  Special Leave Accrual (SLA)

131 MP2. Types of Leave  Annual Leave  Advance Leave  Approval of 30 days or less  Approval of more than 30 days  Convalescent Leave  30 days or less  Exception: 42 days for normal pregnancy  Emergency Leave  Immediate Family  Emergency Leave Process  Terminal Leave  Excess Leave

132 MP3. Passes  Two types  Regular: (Liberty) Starts after normal working hours on a given day and stops at the beginning of normal working hours on the next working day.  Special: Starts after normal working hours on a given day and will not exceed a specific time limit of either three or four days.  3-Day: Must contain at least one duty day  4-Day: Must include two consecutive non-duty days

133 MP4. Permissive TDY (PTDY)  Administrative Absence  Not chargeable as leave  50 specific rules governing PTDY  AFI , Table 7  Examples  New housing with PCS  Pre-separation or Retirement  Accompany dependant or member patient to a designated Medical Treatment Facility

134 WHEN DOES THIS APPLY TO AFRC MEMBERS? CAN WE GIVE AIRMEN ON A UTA WEEKEND A DAY OFF? MP5. Reserve Members

135 MP 6: UNAUTHORIZED ABSENCE  WHEN THEY BEGIN  WHEN THEY END

136 MP 7:AWOL/DESERTER CLASSIFICATION  CLASSIFICATION DETERMINED BY TIME  REASONS FOR IMMEDIATE DESERTER CLASSIFICATION

137 MP 8: RESPONSIBILITIES AND SEQUENCE OF EVENTS  COMMANDER  FIRST SERGEANT  SUPERVISOR  SECURITY FORCES  MPF

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139 WHEN DOES THIS APPLY TO AFRC MEMBERS? CAN AN AIRMAN ON A UTA WEEKEND BE AWOL? MP9. Reserve Members

140 Summary General Guidance General Guidance Types of Leave Types of Leave Passes Passes Permissive TDY Permissive TDY Reserve Members Reserve Members Unauthorized Absence Unauthorized Absence Classification (AWOL/Deserter) Classification (AWOL/Deserter) Sequence of Events Sequence of Events

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143 COGNITIVE SAMPLES OF BEHAVIOR: Describe an objective of the enlisted evaluation system. Explain the unit Enlisted Evaluation System responsibilities. Give an example when an EPR referral would be appropriate.

144 OVERVIEW  Objectives  Individual Responsibilities  Performance Feedback  EPR Management AFI Officer & Enlisted Evaluation Systems AFI Officer & Enlisted Evaluation Systems

145 MP 1: OBJECTIVES OF EES Candid Feedback Official Record

146 MP 2: RESPONSIBILITIES Commander First Sergeant Rater(s)

147 MP 3: PERFORMANCE FEEDBACK What is it? Who provides it? Why is it important?

148 MP 4: EPR MANAGEMENT Which form is used When EPR is required Referral What When Who Inappropriate comments or considerations

149 SUMMARY Objectives Objectives Individual Responsibilities Individual Responsibilities Performance Feedback Performance Feedback EPR Management EPR Management

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152 COGNITIVE SAMPLES OF BEHAVIOR: Identify examples of appropriately applied organizational change management principles. Predict the effect of appropriately applied organizational change management principles on unit effectiveness. Explain the decision to use organizational change management principles.

153 REFERENCES  AFPAM , Professional Development Guide  “Managing Organizational Change, “Hersey P. and Kenneth H. Blanchard

154 Overview  Unfreezing  Change Process  Refreezing

155 MP 1: Unfreezing Unfreezing refers to creating a felt need for change … It involves preparing the situation Example: – PT Fitness – AFI prepared Jan 2010 Implemented 1 July 2010

156 MP 1: Unfreezing SHOULD BE Are What is

157 Forms of Resistance –Uncertainty Ex. Who’s going to get discharge? –Self-Interests –Different Perceptions, No felt need for change Ex. Why do we have to change? It works just fine the way it is. “Most people hate any change that doesn’t jingle in their pockets” Anonymous MP 1: Unfreezing

158 Reducing Resistance –Education & Communication –Participation & Involvement –Facilitation & Support –Incentives –Coercion Evaluation Standards MP 1: Unfreezing

159 MP 2: Changing Anything that alters the status quo Movement from the old state, or the previous norms, to the new state

160 MP 3: Refreezing Locking in Expected Outcomes –Positive Re-enforcement –Evaluate and Monitor –Make Constructive Modifications as Necessary

161 Summary Unfreezing Change Process Refreezing

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164 COGNITIVE SAMPLES OF BEHAVIOR: Recognize proper processing of selected Security Forces forms. Describe driving revocation procedures. Explain the purpose of the Air Force traffic point system.

165 OVERVIEW  Selected Forms  Driving Privileges  Traffic Point System  Commander’s Action

166 MP 1: SELECTED FORMS DD Form 2708 – Human Hand Receipt AF Form 1168 – Statement of Suspect/Witness/Complainant AF Form 3545 – SF Report DD Form 1408 – Traffic Ticket DD Form 1805 – Magistrate Ticket

167 MP 2: DRIVING PRIVILEGES Conditional Privilege – Requirements Implied Consent Suspension – Temporary up to 12 months Revocation – Termination of privilege for 12 months or longer

168 MP 3: TRAFFIC POINT SYSTEM Uniform and impartial administrative device Not substitute for disciplinary or punitive action For moving violations only unless otherwise directed by the Installation Commander

169 MP 4: COMMANDER’S ACTION Installation Commanders May Require: – Unit CC Advisory Letter – Unit CC Counseling – Drivers Improvement and Rehabilitation Program Ground Safety is POC – Medical Evaluation Referral – Drug Or Alcohol Rehabilitation Referral

170 SUMMARY Selected Forms Selected Forms Driving Privileges Driving Privileges Traffic Point System Traffic Point System Commander’s Action Commander’s Action

171

172

173 COGNITIVE SAMPLES OF BEHAVIOR: Describe the LOD process Identify specific procedures and requirements of the LOD process Justify appropriate uses of the LOD process

174 LINE OF DUTY DETERMINATION Overview:  Reference  Definition and Purpose  Who does it apply to  When determinations are made  Possible LOD determinations  Types of determinations  Responsibilities  AF Form 348  Incapacitation Pay

175 Reference: AFI Line of Duty (LOD) Determination AFRCI Incapacitation Pay and Management of Reservist Continued on Active duty Orders MP1 REFERENCES

176 What Is An LOD Determination?  Federal Law requires determination as to whether or not certain injuries or diseases are suffered by military members while in the line of duty (LOD) or as a result of misconduct on the part of the member. MP2 DEFINITION AND PURPOSE

177 Purpose: Protects the government against fraudulent injury claims Protects the rights of Air Force Airmen who are injured while in the line of duty. MP2 DEFINITION AND PURPOSE

178  Active Duty Members  USAF Cadets  AFROTC  AFRC and ANG Members who die, incur or aggravate an illness, injury or disease while:  On Published orders for ANY PERIOD of time or while on Inactive Duty Training (IDT)  Traveling to or from the place the member performs Active Duty Training or Inactive Duty Training MP3 WHO IT APPLIES TO

179  The death of a member (Admin Determination not Sufficient)  Inability to perform military duties exceeds 24 hours  The likelihood of a permanent disability  Medical treatment of a member (regardless of the military member’s ability to perform military duties)  The likelihood of an AFRC member applying for incapacitation pay MP4 WHEN DETERMINATIONS ARE REQUIRED

180 1. In Line of Duty 2.Existed Prior to Service (EPTS) 3. Not in Line of Duty -- Not Due to Misconduct 4. Not in Line of Duty -- Due to Misconduct MP3 Possible LOD Determinations

181 1.Administrative Determinations 2.Informal Determinations 3.Formal Determinations 4.Interim LOD for Reserve Members MP6 Types of Determinations

182 The objective of the Reserve benefit system is to compensate, to the extent permitted by law, members of the Air Force Reserve who experience incapacitation or loss of civilian earnings as a result of an injury, illness, or disease incurred, re-injured or aggravated in the line of duty, and provide the required medical and dental care associated with the incapacitation. Incapacitation Pay

183 1. Administrative Determinations  Made by Medical Officer  Includes: – Existed Prior to Service – Diseases MP6 Types of Determinations

184 2. Informal Determinations  Required when an administrative cannot be made  Appears member was in line of duty and not due to misconduct.  Used when there is no question or further investigation may not be necessary. Example: Injury resulting from falling on a wet floor while on duty and no misconduct. MP6 Types of Determinations

185 3. Formal Determinations  Used when neither administrative or informal determination cannot be used.  Requires additional investigation to make the final determination. Example: Mechanic falling from an aircraft, after becoming intoxicated during lunch. MP6 Types of Determinations

186 4. Interim LOD for Reserve Members  Used when LOD determination cannot be finalized within 7 days of notification and incapacitation pay entitlements may be possible.  Valid for no more than 90 days  Not used when there is clear and convincing evidence of EPTS condition or misconduct  Recorded in an interim memorandum and forward to HQ AFRC/DP for a control number and also to the servicing MPF for processing Example: A reservist is injured and hospitalized after an automobile accident while leaving from the UTA. MP6 Types of Determinations

187 MP7 Responsibilities  Air Force Medical Facility  LOD Process initiated by a medical officer’s review  Administrative Determination can be made  Immediate Commander  AFRC unit commander or senior AFRC commander present  Investigate the circumstance of the case  Fill out items on the back of AF Form 348  Request an interim LOD if required  Send the AF Form 348 to the Appointing Authority, through the SJA.  Appointing Authority  The senior AFRC Commander present (May be the immediate Commander)  Responsible for reviewing the AF Form 348 and taking the following actions:  Coordinate through SJA and ensure Formal Determinations are made when required  Assign a Investigating Officer in formal determinations.  Concur with the immediate commander if appropriate.  MPF Special Actions Section  Acts on behalf of the appointing authority  Sets up suspense’s and monitors progress

188  Staff Judge Advocate  Reviews the commander’s recommendation for legal sufficiency's and conduct  Coordinates to ensure a formal investigation is completed when appropriate  Concur/ not concur with the recommendation  Investigating Officer Conducts the investigation IAW , attachment 3  Reviewing Authority  Senior AFRC commander present (Can be the appointing authority)  Can return file for further investigation is warranted  If no further actions required, forwards case to the approving authority  Approving Authority  For AFRC the Approving Authority is the AFRC/CV  Can return file for further investigation is warranted  Approve final determination and forward the file to HQ ARC/DP MP7 Responsibilities

189 LOD Determination Packages:  Medical documentation to support the claim  Ensure AF Form 348 is legible and completed properly (including signatures)  Documentation establishing the members status at the time of the claim  A unit legal review is helpful, but not required  AF Form 422, when available  Submit in original and 4 copies MP8 LOD Determination Package

190 BACK PAGE OF AF Form 348

191 ITEM 13 Relates to the actual duty status of the member at the time the death, illness, injury or disease occurred. MP8 AF Form 348

192

193 ITEM 14 Record completely and concisely the circumstances surrounding the death, illness, injury or disease based on the immediate commander's informal investigation. DO NOT SAY "SEE ITEM 11." If you need more space, use plain bond paper and identify it as item 14. Include the type of tour and the inclusive tour dates for ARC members. MP8 AF Form 348

194

195 ITEM 15-- Check the appropriate block. If intentional misconduct or willful neglect of the member was not the proximate cause, check "neither of these" and specify the proximate cause. Refer to attachment 1, Glossary of references and support information, for explanation. MP8 AF Form 348

196

197 ITEM 16---(A2.2.6) Do not give "names and addresses" if the source of the information is the member or the police. Do not repeat names and addresses already appearing in item 12 MP8 AF Form 348

198

199 ITEM 17 For ARC members, check one of the four blocks. The immediate commander must date and sign the form MP8 AF Form 348

200 LOD require Prompt and Accurate Action! MP8 AF Form 348

201 Application Scenarios:  Make a Line of Duty determination for each situation  Justify your decision LINE OF DUTY DETERMINATION

202 Scenario 1: SSgt Peterson slipped while coming down the stairs outside the office. It had been raining and water had collected on the landing between the flights of stairs. He twisted his knee and will probably require surgery. Is a LOD required? Why or Why Not? LINE OF DUTY DETERMINATION

203 Scenario 2: TSgt Bouchard went to a pizza restaurant for lunch with another NCO. TSgt Anderson had three glasses of beer with the pizza. Thirty minutes after reporting back to work, TSgt Anderson fell from scaffolding while working on an aircraft engine. He sustained significant trauma to his back and missed two days of work. Is a LOD required? Why or Why Not? LINE OF DUTY DETERMINATION

204 Scenario 3: SrA Tucker was returning from a party Saturday night when she lost control of her car and hit a tree. She suffered a concussion and two broken ribs. Her blood-alcohol level was slightly above the threshold of legal intoxication. SrA Tucker was hospitalized for three days and returned to limited military duty on Wednesday. Is a LOD required? Why or Why Not? LINE OF DUTY DETERMINATION

205 Scenario 4: MSgt Daniels was enroute home from a UTA weekend. He left the unit immediately after the final training period. Ten minutes after leaving, his automobile was struck by another car that had run a stop sign. MSgt Daniels suffered a broken leg and facial lacerations. He was hospitalized overnight, and under the direction of his civilian physician, missed two days at his civilian job. Is a LOD required? Why or Why Not? LINE OF DUTY DETERMINATION

206 LOD require Prompt and Accurate Action!  Failure to process an LOD or misconduct can prompt a formal investigation  Can delay processing of disability retirement or separation causing hardship LINE OF DUTY DETERMINATION

207 The objective of the Reserve benefit system is to compensate, to the extent permitted by law, members of AFRC who experience incapacitation or loss of civilian earnings as a result of an injury, illness, or disease incurred, re-injured or aggravated in the line of duty, and provide the required medical and dental care associated with the incapacitation.  AFRCI  Incapacitation Checklist  Procedures on CPAY  Personnel Entitlement Briefing MP9 INCAPACITATION PAY

208 FIRST SERGEANT IT IS YOUR DUTY FIRST SERGEANT TO TAKE CARE OF YOUR AIRMEN AND OUR UNITED STATES AIR FORCE

209 Review:  Reference  Definition and Purpose  Who does it apply to  When determinations are made  Possible LOD determinations  Types of determinations  Responsibilities  AF Form 348  Incapacitation Pay Summary

210

211

212 COGNITIVE SAMPLES OF BEHAVIOR: 1. Identify the purpose and goals of the ESGR program 2 Determine appropriate procedures associated with support aspects of the ESGR Program 3. Justify appropriate use of support procedures associated with the ESGR Program

213 Overview  Readiness  What is ESGR  ESGR’s Role  Programs and Services  USERRA  Points of Contact

214 Readiness Ready, Willing and Able to Serve and Perform For the Reservist: READINESS requires Employer Support

215 ESGR Established by Presidential declaration in 1972, under the Office of the Secretary Defense Operates programs as a field activity, on behalf of all National Guard and Reserve members Includes 54 committees (every state, District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the the Virgin Islands) staffed by over 4,500 volunteers (business executives, civic and former military leaders) Note: 1 volunteer per 194 Selective Reserve Members

216 Increase public awareness of the critical role and greater utilization / OPSTEMPO of the National Guard and Reserve in the “Total Force” today Increase public awareness of ESGR programs and our mission to build and strengthen cooperation and partnerships between: > Employers > Reserve Component Units/Commanders > National Guard and Reserve Members. NCESGR Goals

217 The ESGR Role  Program Awareness  Mobilization and Mediation Assistance  Employer Support Recognition Programs  Improved Reservist Retention  Improved READINESS

218 Critical Balance ` FamilyEmployer Reservist

219 AFRC Survey Results  Only one-third of companies allow flexible hours to accommodate reserve schedule  34% feel Reserve obligation is causing problems at their civilian job  56% have utilized vacation time from civilian jobs to perform Reserve duty  15% believe they have been denied a civilian promotion because of Reserve duty  10% are thinking of leaving AFRC because of job-related problems  2/3 don’t know services provided by ESGR

220 Mission One and Mobilization Support Awareness: Reservists Rights and Responsibilities “ Mission One” Unit Information Briefings “Mobilization Support” Mobilization Briefing

221 Briefing with the Boss  Candid exchange of information between employer, unit leadership and the reservist  Role of the unit/reservist within the Air Force mission  The Total Force

222 Bosses Day

223 Bosslift Employers see what our reservists are actually doing Employers see the valuable training be conducted Military training enhances civilian job specialties

224 Statement of Support  They will neither deny employment nor limit or reduce job opportunities because of service in the Reserve components  They will grant leaves of absence for military training  They will ensure their Reserve employees are aware of these policies Employers pledge:

225 Employer Recognition Employer Award Programs: Why Reward your Employer? You thank them for their support You create goodwill with the employer You show it’s a two way street

226 Ombudsman Services Ombudsman are volunteers that: Provide information and literature Provide unit briefings or assistance Answer questions Understand and can explain the law (USERRA) Can informally mediate difficult issues

227 Ombudsman Services  Informal Mediation  The Ombudsman Program is extremely effective Greater than 90% of cases resolved Remainder referred to DoL (93% resolved) Almost never go to litigation

228 How to Get Help 1.Your local ESGR representative 2.Ombudsman service - Informal Mediation ( ) 3.Dept of Labor/VETS - Formal Investigation (93% resolved) 4.Dept of Justice/Office of Special Counsel 5.Private Counsel (on your own)

229 Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act* USERRA (Title 38 of United States Code, Chapter 43) 1994 * Administered by Department of Labor

230  Prohibits discrimination against Guard/Reserve service  Ensures continued company benefits -- medical, dental, vision  Ensures participation in company pension, thrift savings, and stock options -- even during military duty  Permits member to file a claim against the employer if USERRA rights are violated USERRA

231 Requirements of USERRA For the Reservist:  Provide advance notice -- written or oral  Less than five years cumulative absence  Serve under honorable conditions  Timely return to civilian job F 30 days or less: safe travel plus 8 hours F 31 to 180 days: two weeks F over 180 days: 90 days

232 For the Employer:  Grant Leave of Absence  Allow for safe travel and rest  Timely reinstatement of member  Grant status/seniority/benefits to returning member  Train member, if necessary  Do not discriminate in: (employment, reemployment, or promotion) Requirements of USERRA

233 The Bottom Line Reservist should... … know there is a law (USERRA) governing employment and reemployment rights … ensure they understand the basic tenets of USERRA … ensure they know whom to contact if they have employer questions or conflicts

234 Point of Contact Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve MSG Irene Torkildson, DSN: , COM: (703)

235 Summary Readiness What is ESGR ESGR’s Role Programs and Services USERRA Points of Contact

236 Employer Support is achieved through a dialogue between employers, units and Reserve members Closing It’s all about Readiness.

237

238

239 COGNITIVE SAMPLES OF BEHAVIOR: Demonstrate diversity management principles in simulated situations. Demonstrate an appropriate course of action involving diversity management principles in simulated situations. Show how diversity can improve effectiveness in the work place.

240  Awareness (Exercise)  Barriers to Diversity Reduce Mission Effectiveness  Effective Management of Diversity Improves Mission Effectiveness, a FAIR way Overview

241 MP 1 What is Diversity? Diversity simply means Differences in people. RACE PERSONALITY DISABILITY GENDER AGE

242 MP2 Effectively Managing Diversity  Awareness (Exercise)  Elements  Barriers to Diversity Reduce Mission Effectiveness  Effective Management of Diversity Improves Mission Effectiveness  FAIR way

243 MP 3 Barriers to Diversity ETHNOCENTRISM -the tendency to view the world from one’s personal or ethnic perspective and to judge others’ values, norms, and behavior as wrong if they differ.

244 MP 3 Barriers to Diversity  Stereotyping  Prejudice  Discrimination  Collusion

245 MP4 What is Stereotyping?  Categorizing  An oversimplified standardized image of a person or group

246 MP4 What is Prejudice?  Preconceived  Biased  Directed against

247  Unfairness  bigotry  The act of drawing a distinction MP4 What is Discrimination?

248 MP4 What is Collusion?  Silence  Denial  Active Participation

249 The FAIR Way to Manage Diversity MP5 The FAIR Way

250 Summary Awareness (Exercise) Barriers to Diversity Reduce Mission Effectiveness Effective Management of Diversity Improves Mission Effectiveness, a FAIR way

251

252

253 COGNITIVE SAMPLES OF BEHAVIOR: Explain the role of the AFOSI Recognize scenarios when AFOSI should be contacted Understand what information a First Sergeant should provide AFOSI

254 OVERVIEW  Who OSI is  What OSI can do for you  What you can do for OSI  What OSI and you can do together

255 MP 1: Who is OSI Patterned after FBI Criminal Fraud Counterintelligence Consolidated investigative services under SECAF Field Operating Agency Under SAF/IG direction/guidance District (Geographically Aligned)

256 MP 1: Who is OSI MAJCOM Aligned (Regions) / Sqs & Detachments Primary Base Interface AF focal point for working w/ U.S. and foreign law enforcement and security services to provide timely/accurate threat info AFOSI Mission: Identify, exploit and neutralize criminal, terrorist and intelligence threats to the U.S. Air Force, Department of Defense and U.S. Government.

257 MP 1: Who is OSI A federal law enforcement agency conducting investigations and operations throughout the spectrum of conflict: Warfighting - Conducts, in hostile/uncertain environments, Counter Threat Operations (CTO) to find, fix, track, neutralize enemy threats Federal LEA - Criminal investigations, counterintelligence (CI), specialized investigative activities, protective service ops, & integrated Force Protection for AF Intelligence Community contributors - Collections and operational work in the areas of our mission sets

258 MP 1: Who is OSI In-garrison - Felony-level investigations & CI/FP Deployed - CI/FP/CT/AT Support to Deployed CCs Inside & Outside the Wire…in garrison and deployed…to find answers to questions which reduce/neutralize threats critical to Air Force, DoD, and US Govt leaders/decision makers

259 MP 1: Who is OSI Law Enforcement (LE): AF’s only federal law enforcement capability Counterintelligence (CI): AF’s only org authorized to conduct CI Deployed: AF’s only “outside the wire” Counter-Threat operations capability Analytical Capability: Fusion of CI, Counter-Terrorism & LE intelligence Cyber Expertise: Nation’s top Cyber intrusion investigators & forensic experts Polygraph services: AF’s only Polygraph and Credibility Assessment (PCA) capability

260 MP 2: What OSI can do for you Good Order and Discipline Bring your Airmen home safely Provide training Use us— we have access to info that can help your CC May not be OSI case but may be able to cut through red tape Support to ANG and AFRC

261 MP 3: What you can do for OSI Arbiter between your commander and us Be there for your Airmen when the interview over Be there for the agent(s) working your case Call us early and often Let OSI know what the “rumor mill” is generating Give OSI opportunities to train and work with your Airmen Insure required reportable CI info is relayed to OSI Let OSI speak with your “borderline” Airmen

262 MP 4: What we can do together Two-way intel Synergistic relationship built on trust Relationships…welcome Superintendents to your group Visit your OSI detachment Welcome the Super to your council Training initiatives

263

264 SUMMARY  Who OSI is  What OSI can do for you  What you can do for OSI  What OSI and you can do together


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