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Unit 3 Poetry TextLevel Where can I find it? Casey at the Batnot availablePDF resource file Casey at the Bat prose summary naPDF resource file Poetry AnthologyvariedPDF.

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Presentation on theme: "Unit 3 Poetry TextLevel Where can I find it? Casey at the Batnot availablePDF resource file Casey at the Bat prose summary naPDF resource file Poetry AnthologyvariedPDF."— Presentation transcript:

1 Unit 3 Poetry TextLevel Where can I find it? Casey at the Batnot availablePDF resource file Casey at the Bat prose summary naPDF resource file Poetry AnthologyvariedPDF resource file Casey at the Bat (video version) na e.com/watch?v=erf Sed2MUsA

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3 I canMy Goals  I can do this with help  I can do this by myself  I can do this with a hard text I can use various strategies (e.g., context clues, root words, affixes) to determine the meaning of general academic and domain specific words and phrases in a text.  I can do this with help  I can do this by myself  I can do this with a hard text I can understand words that may be derived from characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean).  I can do this with help  I can do this by myself  I can do this with a hard text I can determine the meaning of words and phrases based on how they are used in a text.  I can do this with help  I can do this by myself  I can do this with a hard text I can refer to structural elements to explain major differences among poems, drama, and prose.  I can do this with help  I can do this by myself  I can do this with a hard text I can write and talk about the differences between poems, plays and fictional stories.  I can do this with help  I can do this by myself  I can do this with a hard text I can refer to specific elements of poems (verse, rhythm, meter) and plays (characters, settings, descriptions, dialogue, stage directions) when I write or talk about a piece of fiction. Unit 3

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5 I can use various strategies (e.g., context clues, root words, affixes) to determine the meaning of general academic and domain specific words and phrases in a text. I can understand words that may be derived from characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean). I can determine the meaning of words and phrases based on how they are used in a text. I can refer to structural elements to explain major differences among poems, drama, and prose.

6 I can write and talk about the differences between poems, plays and fictional stories. I can refer to specific elements of poems (verse, rhythm, meter) and plays (characters, settings, descriptions, dialogue, stage directions) when I write or talk about a piece of fiction.

7 StandardSuggested Mini-Lessons RL 4.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology.  What strategies can I use to figure out unknown words? (context clues, root words, affixes, etc.)  How can I figure out the meaning of words based on the words and phrases in the text?  How can I figure out what a word means based upon how they are used in the text? RL 4.5 Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems and drama when writing or speaking about a text.  What are the structural elements of a poem?  How do I analyze a poem?  How do I compare poetry to prose?  What is the difference between poetry, drama, and prose?  How do I compare a poem to the visual presentation of the same poem?  How do I write and talk about poetry?  What are other specific elements of a poem when I write or talk about a piece? (characters, settings, descriptions, dialogue, stage directions) Supporting Standard Mini Lessons  How do I find details in a poem to explain answers explicitly found in a text?  How do I draw inferences using information from the text?  How do I determine the theme of a poem?  How do I compare a poem and a visual presentation of the same poem? Unit 3

8 Lesson 1: All About Poetry Reading Mini- Lesson Mini Lesson: (Review of Poetic Elements) –Use the Poetry Anthology 1.Read “The Moon’s the North Wind’s Cookie” aloud to students. Post the following questions: How many stanzas does this poem have? Are there a certain number of lines per stanza? Does the poem rhyme? If so, is there a pattern to the rhyme? Does the author repeat any lines? Use the Poetry Anthology packet. Give each student a copy. Have students work in partners to investigate the posted questions. Confer with students and note where students are having difficulty with these basic concepts about poetry. When students are finished, bring the class back together to discuss the questions and tell them that have done a great job of investigating the structure of the poem. Explain to students that you are going to read the poem again and want them to listen closely to how the poet creates rhythm in the poem. They will be listening for where they hear pauses and when you stress certain words or parts of words, which both contribute to the meter. They will also be using what they noticed about the stanzas, lines, and rhyme pattern. Discuss what the students noticed/heard overall. Then, reread certain stanzas to elaborate certain points about pausing (e.g., end of lines, commas, semi-colons, dashes) and meter. Reread the poem all the way through one time overemphasizing the meter. You may want to have students underline the syllables they hear stressed. Have students note in their journals how the rhyme, meter, and rhythm in a poetry helps in the reading and understanding of poems. Thinking Stems/Anchor Chart: Formative Assessment Opportunities:

9 Lesson 2: All About Poetry Reading Mini- Lesson Mini Lesson: Use the Poetry Anthology Read “The Moon’s the North Wind’s Cookie” aloud to students. Review vocabulary from previous lesson. Today’s Questions: Do all poems have the same type of rhythm, meter, and rhyme? introduce the ideas of imagery and tone/mood How do authors create that in their poetry? Use “The Moon’s the North Wind’s Cookie” as a tool to discuss the other elements of poetry. Add them to class anchor chart. Read the poem “Perhaps You’d Like to Buy a Flower?” by Emily Dickinson. How is this poem different from “The Moon’s the North Wind’s Cookie”? Have students confer in partners, then bring the group back together to discuss. Create an anchor chart in response journals. Guided Practice: Assign group or partners other poems to read from the anthology. They should read the poem, and add it to the chart in their response journal. What elements we have discussed so far are evident in the poem? Share: Bring students back together to read and share the poems they discussed with their partners. Thinking Stems/Anchor Chart: Formative Assessment Opportunities: -Listen to conversations partners have while analyzing their poetry. -Read response journals. Are they effectively picking out elements of poetry?

10 Lesson 3: All About Poetry Reading Mini- Lesson Mini Lesson: Other Elements of Poetry Today’s Questions: What are the other elements authors use in poetry? Review: Rhyme Rhythm Meter Tone Introduce: Figurative Language: simile, metaphor, personification, alliteration) Hyperbole Symbolism Add these to the class anchor chart for elements of poetry. Why do authors use these elements? Have students create a chart in their response journals. Add The Moon’s the North Wind’s Cookie” to the chart. Talk about what elements this poem has. See sample chart below. Guided Practice: Assign group or partners other poems to read from the anthology. They should read the poem, and add it to the chart in their response journal. Students should note the title, quote from the poem, and what language the poet used and why. Share: Bring students back together to read and share the poems they discussed with their partners. Thinking Stems/Anchor Chart: Formative Assessment Opportunities: Title & Author of Poem Accurate Text Quote What language tool did the poet use and why do you think they used this one? What was the poet trying to “show” or make you feel? “The Moon’s the North Wind’s Cookie” “He bites it day by day”Personification – The author wants to show how the moon slowly disappears.

11 Lesson 3: Analyzing Poetry Reading Mini- Lesson Mini Lesson: How do I analyze poetry to help understand the author’s meaning? Sometimes when author’s writing poetry, they use words and language that may seem confusing to us. We can analyze the poems and interpret the language used to help us better understand. Use the poem, “Casey at the Bat” as a mentor text. Today’s Questions: How can I understand what an author is trying to say in a poem? Introduce the poem, Casey at the Bat. Read it out loud to students once or twice. Emphasize the rhythm and rhyme of the poem. Are there other elements in this poem that can help you better understand the poem? Narrative poems tell stories about events. Narrative poems include characters, setting, and plot. “Casey at the Bat” is a famous poem about a batter whose over-confidence contributes to his team losing the game. Points to hit through mini-lessons: 1.Identify Elements of poetry: rhyme, rhythm, tone, imagery, figurative language (create a chart in response journals to record elements of poetry and examples from the text) 2.Vocabulary: This poem has a bit of vocabulary that will be unfamiliar to the students. How can they use context and other clues to figure out what the words mean? How does understanding the vocabulary help you understand the poetry? 3.Analyze Poetry: Now that students have identified the elements of the poem and used their context clues skills to figure out the meaning of unknown words, have them analyze the poem. What does it mean? What message is the author trying to say? After mini-lessons, give students ample time to work collaboratively and individually. They should record their thinking in their reading response journals. Also, show students where in the classroom library they can find poetry books. When reading poetry as an independent reading choice, students can Thinking Stems/Anchor Chart: Formative Assessment Opportunities: 1.The character of Casey tells us a little bit about the difference between being confident and being too confident. Was Casey too confident? Was there ever a time in your life when you felt overconfident about something? What happened? 2. The Mudville Hens lost the game that day. Do you think this was Casey’s fault? When you are part of a team, is it right to blame one teammate for winning or losing? Is it one player’s responsibility or the entire team’s win or loss? 3. If someone from the other team was writing a poem about this same baseball game, do you think the story might be told a little differently? How might they have changed it a bit in their “narrative” of events? Poetry ElementExample from the Text rhyme nine that day; inning more to play imagery And Blake, the much despised, tore the cover off the ball, And when the dust had lifted, and men saw what had occurred, There was Johnnie safe and second and Flynn a-hugging third. tone (tense, anxious) So upon the stricken multitude grim melancholy sat. For there seemed but little chance of Casey’s getting to the bat. personification a smile lit Casey’s face Simile There went up a muffled roar, like the beating of the storm-waves on a worn and distant shore.

12 Lesson Comparing a Poem and Prose Summary of a Poem Readin g Mini- Lesson Learning Target: Lesson Seed #13 I can compare a poem to a prose summary of a poem. Activity: (RL.4.5, W.4.8) You may find that before doing this seed you will need to spend some time with your students on the structural elements of poetry and the structural elements of prose. This will depend on the information you gather from seed #12. According to the thesaurus, stanzas and verses are synonyms. “Technically, a stanza is a succession of lines that form a poem or song, and a verse is either a single line of writing or a series of lines in a song.” RL.4.5 refers to verse as one of the structural elements of poetry. This seed is intended to span over two or more days, depending on your class needs. You will be using “Casey at the Bat” by Ernest Thayer from 101 Great American Poems and a prose summary of “Casey at the Bat” (LINK). It is strongly suggested that students have access to the text being used in this seed. Provide students first with the poem “Casey at the Bat.” Read aloud the poem to students, modeling how to pause at line breaks, how to stress and unstress different syllables, and how to create rhythm as you read. As you read, you want to make your thinking visible to students. This can be performed by either projecting it for students to see, or by blowing the text up and putting on chart paper. The focus is not just on what the poem means, but also on the structural elements of the poem. After you mark your thinking, transfer the big ideas onto the anchor chart. Provide students with the prose summary of “Casey at the Bat.” Have students read this together, marking their thinking and things they notice on the prose summary. Support them as they work. Do they notice that the prose summary visually looks different from the poem? Bring students back together and record the things they noticed on the anchor chart. You may find that you need to provide additional support by adding to the chart for them if they aren’t able to come up with any relevant characteristics of prose. Thinking Stems/Anchor Chart: Formative Assessment Opportunities: These can be written and/or spoken. This seed as a whole will help you determine where to go next instructionally. Compare the poem “Casey at the Bat” to the prose summary of “Casey at the Bat.” What are the similarities between the two? What are the differences? How do the structural elements of poetry contribute to the differences between the two versions?

13 Summary of “Casey at the Bat” The Mudville Nine was down to the visiting team four to two with only one inning left to play. Two players had already struck out, and the crowd was waiting for Casey to come to bat. They felt he was their only hope, but there were still two players in front of Casey. The two players, Blake and Flynn, weren’t very good but they were able to each get on a base. Jimmy Blake landed at second base and Flynn made it to third base. The crowd of 5,000 erupted with cheer as Casey approached the bat. They knew that Casey was the one who would be able to win this game for them! Casey walked up to bat confidently and calmly, smiling along the way. Casey watched as the first ball was thrown but he didn’t swing. He said, “That ain’t my style” The umpire called strike and the crowd went mad. They started yelling to kill the umpire because they were angry about the strike, but Casey held up one hand and the crowd calmed down. Casey signaled to the pitcher and the second ball was thrown. Casey ignored this ball too and the umpire yelled “strike two” This time the crowd yelled “fraud” but stopped as soon as Casey gave them a scornful look. They watched his muscles tighten up and knew that Casey wouldn’t let that ball go by again. The crowd watched as the pitcher let the ball go. Casey swung his bat but all he hit was air. Casey struck out a third time! Somewhere men are laughing and somewhere bands are playing, but in Mudville there is not joy because Casey struck out at that bat.

14 Lesson Comparing a Poem and Prose Summary of a Poem Readin g Mini- Lesson Learning Target: I can craft a written response comparing a poem to a prose summary of a poem. Activity: (RL.4.5, W.4.4, W.4.9) The purpose of this seed is for you to model how to take the information from the anchor chart and craft a written response to the thinking stem: Use the structural elements of poetry to compare and contrast the poem “Casey at the Bat” to the prose summary of “Casey at the Bat.” Begin by reading the thinking stem aloud. Post it so that students can see it. Use this time as an opportunity to model a good writing response for your students. Think aloud as you write. You want students to hear the process as they watch you write. After you have crafted a partial written response, give the students the same thinking stem and have them continue to work to craft a written response. Thinking Stems/Anchor Chart: Formative Assessment Opportunities: Looking at their writing, which students were able to craft their own written response? Were students able to complete the written response that you began modeling?

15 Lesson Comparing a Poem and Visual Display of the Poem Readin g Mini- Lesson Learning Target: I can compare a poem to the visual interpretation of the poem. I can craft a written response comparing a poem to a prose summary of a poem. Activity: (RL.4.5, RL 4.7, W.4.4, W.4.9) The purpose of this seed is for you to model how to take the information from the anchor chart and craft a written response to the thinking stem: Use the structural elements of poetry to compare and contrast the poem “Casey at the Bat” to the visual representation of “Casey at the Bat.” Provide students first with the poem “Casey at the Bat.” Read aloud the poem to students, modeling how to pause at line breaks, how to stress and unstress different syllables, and how to create rhythm as you read. As you read, you want to make your thinking visible to students. This can be performed by either projecting it for students to see, or by blowing the text up and putting on chart paper. The focus is not just on what the poem means, but also on the structural elements of the poem. After you mark your thinking, transfer the big ideas onto the anchor chart. Then, show students the visual representation of the poem. Add to the anchor chart previously created to compare the poem and the prose summary. How is this version different. What does it do for you as a reader? How does it affect your comprehension of the story? (Think about how the visual representation helps the reader understand difficult vocabulary by allowing the reader to see the actions and emotions of the characters). Writing the Response: Begin by reading the thinking stem aloud. Post it so that students can see it. Use this time as an opportunity to model a good writing response for your students. Think aloud as you write. You want students to hear the process as they watch you write. After you have crafted a partial written response, give the students the same thinking stem and have them continue to work to craft a written response. Video Clip Link: Thinking Stems/Anchor Chart: Formative Assessment Opportunities: Looking at their writing, which students were able to craft their own written response? Were students able to complete the written response that you began modeling?

16 Lesson Explaining Difference Between Poetry, Drama and Prose (Review) Readin g Mini- Lesson Learning Target: Lesson Seed #12 I can explain major differences between poetry, drama and prose. Activity: (RL.4.5, RL.4.1, SL.4.1) According to the thesaurus, stanza and verse are synonyms. “Technically, a stanza is a succession of lines that form a poem or song, and a verse is either a single line of writing or a series of lines in a song.” RL.4.5 refers to verse as one of the structural elements of poetry. You will be using three separate texts for this seed. This seed is intended to span over two or more days. Suggested texts for this seed are “Tales of a 4 th Grade Nothing” –play (or any drama), “Casey at the Bat” from 101 Great American Poems in the exemplar texts (or any other poem), and The Sign of the Beaver (or any prose). Students will need access to all three texts. Feel free to use other texts that would satisfy the intent of this seed. Group students in groups of 4 or 5. Each group will receive all three texts and a piece of chart paper. Show them how to set up their anchor chart (see below) into three columns. The title of each text goes at the top of each column. Students are to work together to compare the different texts and chart what they notice about each text. The level of support you provide will depend on what your students are able to discover as they work together. After groups have charted a few items they notice, post them and allow students to do a gallery walk. Make sure you set the expectations for a gallery walk: read each chart and use your post-it notes to post any questions or comments your group may have for the other group. After the gallery walk, groups get their own chart back and have an opportunity to read the feedback others provided. They can add to/change their charts. As a group, look for commonalities between the different charts. Start a class anchor chart. This is your chance to clear up any misconceptions your students may have. After this activity, you will need to make some instructional decisions. Do you need to spend more time on poetry? Drama? Thinking Stems/Anchor Chart: Formative Assessment Opportunities: Based on what information students are able to generate on their charts, then you may need to form small groups or plan whole class instruction to go deeper into the structural elements of poems, drama and/or prose.

17 Other Lesson Options Use the two poems, “Fog” and “Dust of Snow”, follow the lesson plan sample template.

18 Poetry Poem TitlePoetic Elements Example from the Poem The Moon’s the North Wind’s Cookie Rhyme

19 Say What? Title & Author of Poem Accurate Text Quote What language tool did the poet use and why do you think they used this one? What was the poet trying to “show” or make you feel? “The Moon’s the North Wind’s Cookie” by Vachel Lindsay “He bites it day by day” Personification – The author wants to show how the moon slowly disappears.

20 Say What? Title & Author of Poem Accurate Text Quote What language tool did the poet use and why do you think they used this one? What was the poet trying to “show” or make you feel? “The Moon’s the North Wind’s Cookie” by Vachel Lindsay “He bites it day by day” Personification – The author wants to show how the moon slowly disappears. “Perhaps You’d Like to Buy a Flower by Emily Dickinson “unties her yellow bonnet” Personification: The author is trying to help us visualize that the flower is blooming “Wake Up!” by Linnea Pearson “The cardinal’s call is an alarm clock” “as bright red as an apple” Personification – trying to explain how loud the noise is Simile – help us visualize the coloring “Classroom Creature” All lines Personification The author is making us feel like the pencil sharpener is really alive. The words help us visualize what it is doing while our pencils are being sharpened. Melting Winter miniature mountains loom alliteration – makes me visuallize small snow piles imagery “Leaves” by Hilda Conkling

21 Casey at the Bat Poetry ElementExample from the Text rhyme nine that day; inning more to play imagery tone (tense, anxious) personification simile other

22 Poem vs. Prose Summary PoemProse Summary

23 Poem vs. Visual Presentation PoemVisual Presentation

24 Poem vs. Prose Summary “Casey at the Bat” Read both the poem “Casey at the Bat”, as well as the prose summary. What do they have in common? What is different? Give at least 2 examples for each. _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________

25 Golden Keys Smarter Balanced Sample CR Item

26 Golden Keys A bunch of golden keys is mine To make each day with gladness shine. "Good morning!" that's the golden key That unlocks every door for me. When evening comes, "Good night!" I say, And close the door of each glad day. When at the table "If you please" I take from off my bunch of keys. When friends give anything to me, I'll use the little "Thank you" key. "Excuse me," "Beg your pardon," too, When by mistake some harm I do. Or if unkindly harm I've given, With "Forgive me" key I'll be forgiven. On a golden ring these keys I'll bind, This is its motto: "Be ye kind.” I'll often use each golden key, And so a happy child I'll be.

27 Golden Keys Explain how the organization o the poem into different stanzas helps the reader understand its meaning. Include examples from the poem to support your answer.__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

28 Golden Keys Rubrics

29 The Zoo Visit

30 Read the passage below, which comes from a short story about a boy’s visit to a zoo, and then answer the question that follows. Stephen leaned against the wooden fence, resting his chin on the top. He could see the small herd of deer grazing near the group of trees inside their enclosure. They were so beautiful! The brown coats reminded him of the inside of a caramel-filled chocolate bar. Then, suddenly, a white shape emerged from behind the trees. It was a goat just like the others, but this one had a beautiful white coat. His classmate Joanna tapped him on the arm and said knowingly, “It’s an albino goat. I read about them in a book.” Which word from the passage comes from the Latin word albus, which means white. My Answer: __________________________________________ Name: __________________________________________


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