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Played in England since Tudor times. In 1828, William Clarke in London published a book which included the rules of rounders. The first nationally formalised.

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Presentation on theme: "Played in England since Tudor times. In 1828, William Clarke in London published a book which included the rules of rounders. The first nationally formalised."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Played in England since Tudor times. In 1828, William Clarke in London published a book which included the rules of rounders. The first nationally formalised rules were drawn up by the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) in Ireland in In Great Britain it is regulated by the National Rounders Association (NRA) which was informed in 1943 Rounders is linked to British baseball, which is still played in Liverpool, Cardiff and Newport. The game is now played up to international level.

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4 Games are played between Two teams of between six and fifteen players. Bowlers have to bowl under arm at a height that is between the head and the knee of the batter and without letting the ball bounce, go wide, or go straight at the bowler. A rounder is scored when the fourth post is reached before another ball is bowled or if the fourth post is reached on a no ball.

5 A half rounder is scored if the fourth post is reached without hitting the ball, the 2nd post is reached after hitting the ball, there is obstruction by a fielder or there are two consecutive no balls. The most common ways to be out is when you are caught by a fielder, you are stumped at a post before reaching it or if you run inside a post. When at a post you must remain in contact with that post When the bowler has the ball in his square you cannot run between posts. You cannot have more than one batter at each post. You must touch the fourth post on getting home.

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