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TOSS – BFK REGIONAL MANUFACTURING PRESENTATION. Meeting Goals Create a Greater Awareness of the Opportunities in Advanced Manufacturing Identify Regional.

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Presentation on theme: "TOSS – BFK REGIONAL MANUFACTURING PRESENTATION. Meeting Goals Create a Greater Awareness of the Opportunities in Advanced Manufacturing Identify Regional."— Presentation transcript:

1 TOSS – BFK REGIONAL MANUFACTURING PRESENTATION

2 Meeting Goals Create a Greater Awareness of the Opportunities in Advanced Manufacturing Identify Regional Curriculums in Education that Interface with Advanced Manufacturing Technology Explore Career Pathways that Contribute to the Needs of Regional Manufacturers Identify Critical Next Steps

3 Education and Manufacturing, Where & How do they Connect for Success ?

4 There are only three ways that a country builds wealth – you; 1.Make things 2.Mine things and; 3.Grow things Everything else is ancillary to that. Manufacturing has the best record for add-on jobs. For every job that is created in manufacturing, there are multiple add-on jobs that are created as a result.” – Pat Lee, Fabricators & Manufacturers Association

5 Not only the wealth; but the independence and security of a Country, appear to be materially connected with the prosperity of manufactures. ~ Alexander Hamilton (1791)

6 Is Manufacturing a Good Career Path Option? 1.Manufacturing in America is Big Business with Unlimited Potential for Current and Emerging Generations 2.Manufacturing Creates Economic Wealth 3.The United States Must be Competitive in Manufacturing to Survive Today’s Global Business Environment / Economy 4.Manufacturing Can’t Just Survive; It Must Thrive 5.Cooperative Efforts are Vital at All Levels (Business & Industry, Education and Community) 6.Manufacturing Organizations Will Need Thousands of Qualified People to Replace Retiring Workers and / or Openings. Note:  Approximately % of the manufacturing workforce is on the shop floor (semi-skilled operators / assemblers etc)  Replacements – High Demand / Short Supply 7.Technology is Vastly Changing the Manufacturing Environment 8.More Professional Jobs Will be Intergal to the Success of Manufacturing 9.Manufacturing Jobs Will Continue to Pay More Per Year Than the Average Service Job 10.Manufacturing Companies are Posturing to Bring Manufacturing Back to the United States

7 State of Manufacturing Manufacturing today is not dead; it’s just different New machineries and materials Increased automation and smarter logistics define modern manufacturing. Long Term Critical Need for an Educated Skilled Work Force Globalization Technology / Innovation New Types of Products Different Infrastructures

8 1)In the most recent data, manufacturers contributed $2.09 trillion to the economy, having risen steadily since being $1.73 trillion in 2009.The sector currently accounts for 12.0 percent of GDP. For every $1.00 spent in manufacturing, another $1.37 is added to the economy, the highest multiplier effect of any economic sector. The US produces 21% of all global manufactured products. 2)Manufacturers can choose from locations in an increasing number of communities with location advantages that meet their needs. Excellence in education is a key factor in site selection. 3)Manufacturing supports an estimated 17.6 million jobs in the United States about one in six private-sector jobs. More than 12 million Americans (or 9 percent of the workforce) are employed directly in manufacturing. 4)In 2013, the average manufacturing worker in the United States earned $77,506 annually, including pay and benefits. The average worker in all industries earned $62,546. Taken alone, US manufactures would be the 8 th largest economy in the world. 5)Manufacturers in the United States are the most productive in the world, far surpassing the worker productivity of any other major manufacturing economy, leading to higher wages and living standards.

9 Innovation Innovation is the key driver of competitiveness, wage and job growth, and long term economic growth. The U.S. is lagging behind in innovation in its manufacturing sector relative to high-wage nations such as Germany and Japan. Individual companies cannot justify the investment required to fully develop many important new technologies or to create the full infrastructure to support advanced manufacturing. Private investment must be complemented by public investment (public-private partnership). A sustainable, lean, industry-focused innovation model will create an environment for American manufacturing innovation that will advance U.S. manufacturing competitiveness and drive export growth.

10 Example of a Regional Manufacturing Center

11 Priorities to Improve Manufacturing Competitiveness Challenges Opportunities Percentage of votes for an option

12 Manufacturers Recognize the Importance of Innovation to Competitiveness How important will having world-class manufacturing technologies be to your company's overall competitiveness in the next 5 years? Extremely important Not at all important Source: 2011 EWI Member Survey; 350 respondents Percentage of respondents selecting an option

13 US Innovation Gap: Insufficient Emphasis on Maturing New Manufacturing Technology Structural problem requires a structural solution Universities, NSF Centers, Federal Labs High-risk research Long time horizon Not focused on shop floor implementation Industry, NIST MEP Incremental improvement Off the shelf technology Short time horizon Time to deployment Technical Innovation Best Practices Basic Research/ Education Manufacturing Technology Innovation Missing Middle Manufacturing technology innovation, maturation, commercialization, insertion Medium time horizon High impact

14 An Effective Model Must Overcome Four Principle Barriers Source: Aug EWI member survey; 550 respondents What are the biggest barriers to successful collaborative manufacturing technology development? 1. Funding 2. IP ownership 3. Competition 4. Delivery Percentage of respondents selecting option

15 Successful innovation is the use of new technological knowledge, market knowledge, and business models that can deliver a new product or service, or product/service combinations, to customers who will purchase at prices that will provide profits.  The majority of workers are in frontline positions, yet most organizations do not align their training and educational Pathways to effectively support their largest group of employees.  Statistics and common sense tell us that the vast majority of workers are engaged in frontline positions  Despite their overwhelming numbers, we don’t read much about frontline workers. Their indisputable impact on corporate bottom lines notwithstanding, we don’t see many business books written about how to help frontline employees or leaders be successful  There is an untouched innovation factory residing in the collective brain trust—customer insights, product ideas, and service upgrades—that most companies have no idea how to access. BloomBurg Business Week 2012

16 7 Success Factors to Innovation 1)Utilize new technology and market knowledge, to create business models that can deliver a new product or service, or product/service combinations, to customers who will purchase at prices that will provide profits 2)Foster a culture that embraces risk taking 3)Create a unique alignment of mission & goals 4)Accept a climate where mistakes are o.k. 5)Emphasize exploratory thinking, idea generation, and experimentation 6)Develop interpersonal relationships & teamwork that are cohesive and supportive 7)Fully engage in cross-functional collaboration, communication and execution

17 Manufacturing Pipeline Example from US Chamber of Commerce

18 Industry Consortia Application Centers 2 Components of the Manufacturing Accelerator Network  Sector specific; organized around industry clusters  Member based collaborations; financial support to demonstrate relevance  Government/industry cost share pre-competitive technology development  Engages universities and national labs to address “grand challenges”  Workforce development through educational institutions  IP framework that reduces barriers to collaboration  Manufacturing technology specific; capabilities that are world-beating  Facilities and expertise to support all sectors and business sizes  501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporations focused on industry clients  Primarily industry funded to implement technology for proprietary applications  Modest government funding to build core capabilities  IP framework that reduces barriers to implementation

19 Industry Consortia Precompetitive technology development Workforce Training Universities, NSF Centers, Federal Labs High-risk research Long time horizon Not focused on shop floor implementation Bridging the Innovation Gap Application Centers Mature and commercialize technology Implement for industrial applications Industry, NIST MEP Incremental improvement Off the shelf technology Short time horizon Time to deployment Technical Innovation National network of industry-focused application centers and consortia linked to existing assets

20 Typical Manufacturing Plant Structure Material Purchased Manufactured Building Infrastructure, Machines, Equipment & Supplies People 80 – 85 % Direct 15 – 20 % Indirect Leadership Smart, Innovative and Agile Learning Tribal Knowledge + Formal Education Work Teams Empowered Engaged, and Efficien t Satisfied Customers Repeat Business New Business

21 An Existing Innovation Opportunity The majority of workers are in frontline positions, yet most organizations do not align their training to largest group of employees. Statistics and common sense tell us that the vast majority of workers are engaged in frontline positions Despite their overwhelming numbers, we don’t read much about frontline workers. Their indisputable impact on corporate bottom lines notwithstanding, we don’t see many business books written about how to help frontline employees or leaders be successful There is an untouched innovation factory residing in the collective brain trust—customer insights, product ideas, and service upgrades—that most companies have no idea how to access.

22 Global Manufacturing Terms Safety Lean Enterprise ISO 9000 Total Quality Management (TQM) Problem Solving Manufacturing Metrics / Measuring Instruments Automation Computer Aided Design Engineering Drawings Work Instructions Advanced Manufacturing Team Work Fundamentals of Work Coaching / Mentoring Robotics Innovation

23 Problem Solving Like all organizations, manufacturing companies have problems to solve To resolve a problem a team of motivated cross-functional members are selected from the following areas; Manufacturing Quality Maintenance Engineering Shipping/Receiving Accounting Purchasing Sales Etc……

24 Problem Solving Example of How a Problem is Defined:

25 Problem Solving Examples of tools utilized for data collection to either search for a problem or verify a countermeasure:

26 Measuring Devices As manufacturing has evolved, inspection is no longer conducted by Quality Control. To be more competitive, indirect labor reductions require that these tasks be performed by manufacturing operators. Key measuring devices utilized by manufacturing are Calipers and Micrometers.

27 Measuring Devices The main use of the Vernier caliper is to measure the internal and the external diameters of an object.

28 Measuring Devices Micrometers are used for precise measurement of components in manufacturing, machining, and mechanical engineering. Types of Micrometers

29 Blueprint Reading Basic blueprint reading is needed in the manufacturing industry to enable team members to understand how to: Identify the height, width, and length dimensions of a part by reviewing a drawing. Interpret the various symbols and notations used on drawings (Geometric Tolerancing). It is necessary for team members to convert Metric to English and English to Metric as drawing callouts vary.

30 Blueprint Reading Example of common manufacturing Blueprint : Common Geometric Tolerancing callouts:

31 Work Instructions It is critical for manufacturing team members to understand and follow work instructions. A work instruction is written after a proven method of producing a quality product in a safe manner has been determined. Performing work the same way every time may be referred to as Standardized Work. Quality products can be produced time after time when a good method is created and standardized work is followed. Any out-of-standard work destroys continuous flow and makes it difficult to maintain efficient and consistent production.

32 Work Instructions Example of common operator work instructions :

33 Work Instructions

34 Summary Facts: 1)Manufacturing in America is Exciting with Unlimited Potential for Current and Emerging Generations 2)Manufacturing Creates Economic Wealth 3)The United States Must be Competitive in Manufacturing to Survive Today’s Global Business Environment / Economy 4)Manufacturing Can’t Just Survive; It Must Thrive 5)Cooperative Efforts are Vital at All Levels (Business & Industry, Education and Community) Opportunities: 1)Manufacturing Organizations Will Need Thousands of Qualified People to Replace Retiring Workers and / or Openings. 2)Technology is Vastly Changing the Manufacturing Environment 3)More Professional Jobs Will be Intergal to the Success of Manufacturing 4)Manufacturing Jobs Will Continue to Pay More Per Year Than the Average Service Job 5)Manufacturing Companies are Posturing to Bring Manufacturing Back to the United States Concerns: 1)A Negative Image is the Single Biggest Problem of Manufacturing 2)Parents and Educators do not View Working in a Factory as an Acceptable Career 3)To Generate Economic Growth / Development, Communities Work Hard to Recruit New Business / Manufacturing; but Have Done Very Little to Promote Manufacturing Education 4)There is a Strong Resistance to Change At all Levels 5)The Clock is Ticking

35 Advanced Manufacturing Technology Training Program A partnership between Henderson County Schools, Decatur County Schools and the Tennessee College of Applied Technology – Jackson

36 “Success In the New Economy”

37 According to the Tennessee Manufacturers Register: Tennessee is experiencing a “manufacturing renaissance” due to improvements in the national economy, the state’s business friendly environment, educated workforce and ideal location for shipment of goods. From September 2012 to September 2013, Tennessee added 4,197 manufacturing jobs. We now have 6,990 manufacturers employing 385,858 workers across the state. Source: The Tennessean, “TN Manufacturing Jobs up by 4,197, beating National Average Gains”. By: C. Chambers Williams, III, December 13, Manufacturing in Tennessee

38 LWIAs 11 & 12 encompass all of West Tennessee except for Shelby County. *Through 2016, there will be 1,050 annual openings in “direct labor” jobs and 925 annual openings in “indirect labor” jobs. “Direct” vs. “Indirect” labor Advanced Manufacturing Career Pathway *Source: TN Department of Labor and Workforce Development, LWIA 11 and LWIA 12 Employer Survey Advanced Manufacturing in LWIA’s 11 & 12

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40 Industry has expressed a need for better-trained, entry-level “Direct” labor This program is designed to meet the needs of local manufacturing facilities by providing a pool of well- trained, entry-level production associates. Graduates will complete both lecture and hands-on instructional activities (classroom and lab) that equip them with an understanding of modern manufacturing processes and procedures. Advanced Manufacturing Technology (AMT) Program

41 TCAT Jackson will deliver the training via a “dual- enrollment” arrangement with the local school systems. Students will receive both high school and TCAT credit for passing the courses. In Henderson County, Lexington High and Scotts Hill High School students will come to the TCAT extension campus for the program. The Manufacturing Skills Standards Council’s (MSSC) Certified Production Technician™ (CPT) computer- based course work is integrated into the program. Advanced Manufacturing Technology (AMT) Program

42 The Certified Production Technician™ (CPT) program covers five (5) areas of emphasis via a computer-based learning system: Industrial Safety, Quality Practices & Measurement, Manufacturing Processes & Production, Maintenance Awareness and Green Production. When a student passes the required exams, they earn the CPT credential. Advanced Manufacturing Technology (AMT) Program

43 Win/Win/Win: Meets local industry needs Introduces students to manufacturing careers Equips students with a nationally recognized credential that validates their skills Gives students another option to keep them engaged in school and keep tracking to graduation Contributes to local ECD efforts (industry recruiting) Students earn post-secondary credit at the high school level (paid for by lottery funds) Advanced Manufacturing Technology (AMT) Program

44 Challenges: Gaining “buy-in” from more local industry Preferential hiring? Taking advantage of outside funding opportunities TCATs just had a 4.6% reduction in state appropriations “Drive to 55” (LEAP) Cost $750 to credential each student Generating student interest Advanced Manufacturing Technology (AMT) Program

45 In order to revitalize manufacturing and give a dynamic boost to our economy, we need to restructure the way we are educating our students and employees.

46 Blended Learning Pathway for Manufacturing Certification https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gG1pw6A-Usw

47 Career Pathways for Student Success

48 Innovative Pathways for Student Success Delivery Options 1)Integrate CPT Modules into existing CTE Courses with Possible Options for Dual Enrollment 2)Blended Learning Options during the School Day for non-CTE Students 3)Virtual Deliver Outside the Regular School Day with Post Secondary Institutions 4)Summer Academies that Lead to a Fast Track Credentialing Options to Access Tennessee Promise Funding More Options Are Possible

49 Additional sites regarding CPT

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51 For Education, Manufacturing and Business to Continue to Survive and Thrive In the Future, Strong Passionate Leadership is Required. We must have: Leaders who will together cohesively and who will: Encourage, Lead and Manage Change Actively Participate in Pursuing and Procuring Funding Dedicate The Time it Takes to Succeed Make a Long-Term Commitment Execute Courageously Be dedicated to Continuous Improvement Lead By Example Develop a New Way of Thinking Regarding Innovation and Agility Think “Out of the Box” and; Formulate, Communicate and Facilitate a “New Work Together Paradigm”

52 Needed: Tactical and Strategic Leaders Who Are: 1) Innovative ~ Predict the Future by Creating it 2) Agile ~ Ability to Move Quickly and Easily 3) Engaged ~ Positive Emotional Attachment 4) Execution (ers) ~ Discipline to Get Things Done

53 Quotes to Consider “Let us put our minds together and see what life we can make for our children” ~ Sitting Bull “The true meaning of life is to plant trees, under whose shade you do not expect to sit” ~ Nelson Henderson

54 Discussion Comments Questions


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