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National Electrification Program Investment Prospectus (2015–2019) Draft Final Results Alex Sundakov, September 2014.

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Presentation on theme: "National Electrification Program Investment Prospectus (2015–2019) Draft Final Results Alex Sundakov, September 2014."— Presentation transcript:

1 National Electrification Program Investment Prospectus (2015–2019) Draft Final Results Alex Sundakov, September 2014

2 1 PRESENTATION OUTLINE Roll out program for 5 years Financing need Donor support rationale Potential Tariff Paths Funding Gap and Government Support Needed

3  Earth Institute estimates that the total number of connections required for universal electrification by 2030 is apprx 7.2 million  Majority of connections on the grid by 2030  About 11,000 households permanently off-grid and around 250,000 possible pre-electrification  Earth Institute estimates that the total number of connections required for universal electrification by 2030 is apprx 7.2 million  Majority of connections on the grid by 2030  About 11,000 households permanently off-grid and around 250,000 possible pre-electrification Roll-out plan for universal electrification by Total Planned Connections (2030) Source: Earth Institute

4 National least-cost roll-out 3 This means that the cheapest connections, wherever they happen to be in the country, are made first. Biggest “bang for the buck” Resulting Connections in Each State Central corridor prioritized in the first 5 years for grid connection. Mini-grids and household elsewhere Connected earlier Connected later Source: Earth Institute

5 Projected connections targets over entire roll-out 4 After 2019, over 517,000 connections have to be made each year to reach full electrification by 2030 Projected National Electrification Rate 30% 47% 76% 100%

6 Why consider pre-electrification connections? 5 Although it will add some costs to the roll-out program, some pre-electrification in the early part of NEP may be efficient because:  There will be time to amortize the costs of investments in temporary solutions (for e.g. diesel mini-grid)  Some renewable generation sources serving off-grid solutions can remain viable on the grid NEP Program Years Temporary electrification solution while waiting for the grid (e.g. mini-grids, micro-grids, SHS) may be efficient and provide social inclusion to household slated for grid connection at the end of the roll-out We estimate that approximately 250,000 households will use pre-electrification solutions in the first 10 years of the program No. of Households Electrified

7 How many connections are feasible in the first 5 years? 6 Technically and physically feasible to implement about 1.7 million additional connections from FY Pace of ramp-up limited by:  Institutional weaknesses  Available skilled labor  Procurement practices New Conns Required 2012 Actual ESE 6,993,53959,00075,000150,000225,000337,500517,170 YESB 207,752130,000 77, Total 205,000227,752225,000337,000517,170  Approximately 125,000 total mini-grid and off-grid household solution connections can be made. Includes both permanent and estimated pre-electrification connections

8 With national least-cost roll-out, US$650 million of loans will be needed from FY This amount will cover the expansion program’s gross capital expenditures. Additionally the implementation of the Institutional Roadmap will require Technical Assistance of $24 million With national least-cost roll-out, US$650 million of loans will be needed from FY This amount will cover the expansion program’s gross capital expenditures. Additionally the implementation of the Institutional Roadmap will require Technical Assistance of $24 million What is the financing need to achieve 1.7 million connections? 7 Numbers are in constant US$, does not include inflation In US$ Million Type of investment Grid Investment$72.5$80.6$79.8$139.9$232.2 Mini-grid Investment $0.6 Pre-electrification Investment $2$3$4.5$6.5$8.5 Off-grid Investment$2.2 $3.2 Annual Investment$77.3$86.4$87.1$150.2$244.5 Technical Assistance$10.3$6.8$2.2 $3.1$1.4

9 Low interest, long tenor donor-backed loans will:  Enable Myanmar to achieve the targeted 1.7 million connections in next 5 years. This will: ­Contribute to Myanmar’s economic development by giving those households access to electricity ­Underwrite the ramp-up in both technical and institutional capability required to achieve full electrification by 2030  Ensure that the burden on consumers and on Government is consistent with ability to pay. Long tenor loans ensure that future electricity users—who will be better off than the current users—pick up a fair share of the burden  Over time, as the economy becomes integrated with the global financial system and as local banking system matures, commercial finance will become available on tenors and other terms that can replace concessional finance without a material shock to tariffs. Low interest, long tenor donor-backed loans will:  Enable Myanmar to achieve the targeted 1.7 million connections in next 5 years. This will: ­Contribute to Myanmar’s economic development by giving those households access to electricity ­Underwrite the ramp-up in both technical and institutional capability required to achieve full electrification by 2030  Ensure that the burden on consumers and on Government is consistent with ability to pay. Long tenor loans ensure that future electricity users—who will be better off than the current users—pick up a fair share of the burden  Over time, as the economy becomes integrated with the global financial system and as local banking system matures, commercial finance will become available on tenors and other terms that can replace concessional finance without a material shock to tariffs. Strong development rationale to meet financing need from donor sources 8

10 Size of funding gap depends on decisions about tariffs 9  Funding gap is $2.2 billion over a 40-yr period at the current tariff  Reduced to $1.1 billion with an existing system cash neutral tariff  Reduced to $0.25 billion with maintaining a residential tariff equivalent to Vietnam Myanmar current tariff Existing system cash neutral tariff Vietnam tariff Average Residential Tariff $/kWh Funding Gap US$ Billion Funding gap = (Revenue + Loan Amount Received) – (Capex + Opex + Loan Repayment) Note: Assumes all loans are concessional, at 1.25% with 25 year repayment and 5 year grace period

11 What tariffs are needed to make the existing system cash neutral? 10 Steady tariff increases in real terms would be needed to accommodate rising generation costs…. Comparison of Various Tariff Paths for National Least Cost Connections Scenario

12 Effect of tariff choice on PV of funding gap 11 If tariffs are increased such that the existing system is made cash neutral, the PV of the funding gap about US$1.1 billion. If tariffs kept constant in real terms, the PV is US$2.2 billion Funding gap period , 10% discount rate for PV calculation, figure is for National Least -cost Cash Outflows Cash Inflows Cash Inflows Tariffs maintained in real terms Tariffs increased to make existing system cash neutral

13 Government will need to subsidize operating losses (revenues-opex) and pay debt service (principle repayment & interest) every year to close the funding gap over time. Government support is needed to close the funding gap 12  Current total budget support to MOEP is US$567 million per year  Access to financing reduces need for support  Support needed starts low and quickly ramps up

14  Assuming that financing can be secured, initial pace of ramp-up in roll-out is determined by institutional and technical constraints  To achieve the target of nearly 100% electrification by 2030, annual new connections must be ramped up to more than 550,000 per year five years from now: a more than two-fold increase  Donor commitment to meet the financing need of the 5-year program is essential to achieve the ramp up  The Government must make difficult decisions about future tariffs. The funding gap will depend on the tariff path  The roll-out program is financially viable. Institutional weakness is the biggest risk to the roll-out  Assuming that financing can be secured, initial pace of ramp-up in roll-out is determined by institutional and technical constraints  To achieve the target of nearly 100% electrification by 2030, annual new connections must be ramped up to more than 550,000 per year five years from now: a more than two-fold increase  Donor commitment to meet the financing need of the 5-year program is essential to achieve the ramp up  The Government must make difficult decisions about future tariffs. The funding gap will depend on the tariff path  The roll-out program is financially viable. Institutional weakness is the biggest risk to the roll-out Conclusions 13

15 Wellington Level 2, 88 The Terrace PO Box Wellington New Zealand Sydney Young Street Sydney, NSW 2000 Australia Washington 1747 Pennsylvania Ave NW Suite 1200 Washington DC 20006, USA New York 200 Park Avenue Suite 1744 New York, NY 10166, USA Bogotá Carrera 7 No Torre 1, Oficina 1424 Bogotá Colombia Paris 7 Rue Claude Chahu Paris France Alex Sundakov Young Street Sydney, NSW 2000 Australia Contact Us


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