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OBJECTIVE  You will be able to analyze the Nullification Crisis and Andrew Jackson’s battle with the national bank. DO-FIRST  If you had to buy a new.

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Presentation on theme: "OBJECTIVE  You will be able to analyze the Nullification Crisis and Andrew Jackson’s battle with the national bank. DO-FIRST  If you had to buy a new."— Presentation transcript:

1 OBJECTIVE  You will be able to analyze the Nullification Crisis and Andrew Jackson’s battle with the national bank. DO-FIRST  If you had to buy a new pair of shoes, would you pay for the one that was made in the United States which cost $40, or would you pay for the shoes that were made in China which cost $70. Why? Explain your answer in 2 sentences.

2  To understand the Nullification Crisis, we must first be able to answer the question: What is a tariff? 

3  As president of the U.S., Jackson faced one of the first major challenges to his authority (power as leader of the nation) with the Nullification Crisis.  In 1828, Congress passed a law that raised the tariffs, or taxes, on imported goods (items brought into the U.S. from other countries).  By passing these tariffs on foreign goods, manufacturers and factory owners in the United States would make more money—people would buy goods made in the U.S. because they were cheaper than foreign goods that had the tariff (extra tax on them).

4  Why did Congress pass a tariff on foreign goods?

5  These tariffs helped factory owners in the U.S. to make more money—it was strongly supported by the North.  In the South, however, people called this the Tariff of Abominations (terrible horror). For Southerners, this meant that if they wanted to buy foreign goods, they would have to pay more money!  It also meant that this would hurt their trade with other countries, and many states in the South relied on trading their cotton to survive. Southerners were angry that this law only helped the North. They believed this was an abuse of national government power and it ignored their needs. VS.

6  Why were Southerners angry about the tariff?

7  John C. Calhoun, the Vice President, agreed with southern states. He believed in states’ rights—that states should have more power than the national government—and he suggested that southern states declare this law “nullified” or invalid (this mean that Southerners would not obey this new law on tariffs).  To avoid more conflict, President Jackson agreed to lower the tariff. But Southerners in the state of South Carolina were still not happy—they wanted to get rid of the law.

8  But Southerners in the state of South Carolina were still not happy—they wanted to get rid of the law.  Led by Calhoun, the people of South Carolina declared their state’s right to “nullify” any national law that hurt their state.  South Carolina even threatened to secede—break away from the United States—if the national government tried to enforce the new tariff law.

9  What did the people of South Carolina do when the President agreed to lower the tariff? Why did they do this?

10  President Jackson would not accept this threat—he asked Congress to pass the Force Bill which declared that he would use the federal (national) army to enforce the tariff.  He also lowered the tariff even further to make Southerners happy. With the threat of the U.S. army, and with the lower tariff, South Carolina backed down and the nullification crisis ended.

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12  President Jackson had always thought of himself as a defender of the people—the poor, less educated, simply people of the United States.  He was not born into wealth, like most other politicians, he had worked hard to make a life for himself—he was a “self- made man.”  Jackson believed that the national bank did not help the people, but instead helped only the wealthiest in America.

13  Why did President Jackson see himself as “defender of the people”?

14  Jackson distrusted the national Bank—he believed it had become too powerful and that it was a “monster” that needed to be destroyed.  Jackson hated the president of the bank—Nicholas Biddle. Biddle was everything that Jackson was not—a wealthy, well-born politician and banker.  Jackson did not want to renew the national bank’s charter (keep the bank in business) because he believed that the bank only helped the rich get richer.

15  When it was time to renew the bank’s charter, Jackson vetoed the bill. He believed that the bank had become too powerful and was unconstitutional.  This made Jackson an even more popular president—though many businessmen who relied on the bank were hurt by Jackson’s decisions, there were many more poor farmers in America who saw Jackson as a strong and fearless leader who stood up for their rights!

16   18:45 to 19:30

17  Why did Jackson become more popular when he vetoed the bill to renew the bank’s charter?

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19  Complete your exit ticket! Be sure to show your strategies to get full credit.  Once you finish, assign yourself silently


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