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© 2001, J. Douglass Klein McDuffie “The [principle] which secures the people against all taxes and burdens not imposed by their own representatives.”

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Presentation on theme: "© 2001, J. Douglass Klein McDuffie “The [principle] which secures the people against all taxes and burdens not imposed by their own representatives.”"— Presentation transcript:

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2 © 2001, J. Douglass Klein McDuffie “The [principle] which secures the people against all taxes and burdens not imposed by their own representatives.” (528) “The southern States, then, are reduced to the very same relation to the tariff states… as that in which all the colonies formerly stood to Great Britain.” (p. 533)

3 © 2001, J. Douglass Klein Preview Debate on the Tariff Bill, 1832 Documents Relative to the Manufactures in the US, 1833 South Carolina Ordinance of Nullification, 1832 Morals of Manufacturing, Morals of Commerce, 1837 Elements of Political Economy, 1837 (Francis Wayland) Protection or Free Trade: Dudley vs. Rawlins, 1880 Principles of Political Economy, 1886 (Wayland & Chapin) Cleveland, Annual Message,1887 Thompson, 1888 Harrison, Annual Message, 1890

4 © 2001, J. Douglass Klein Review and Context George Washington ( ) - F John Adams ( ) - F Thomas Jefferson ( ) - DR James Madison ( ) - DR James Monroe ( ) - DR John Quincy Adams ( ) - none Andrew Jackson ( ) - D Martin Van Buren ( ) - D The Presidents of the United States of America

5 © 2001, J. Douglass Klein Dimensions of Politics Size of federal government – federal v. state rights Support for business/wealth v. support for worker/poor Protection v. Free Trade North v. South; East v. West Lender v. Borrower Which party supports which views/interests? When and why do parties realign?

6 © 2001, J. Douglass Klein The Tariff Bill The year: The debate is over setting the level of tariffs for: iron books wine copper brown sugar race ginger woolens distilled spirits red lead frying pans silk cotton bagging

7 © 2001, J. Douglass Klein The Tariff Bill The speakers: Clark of New York (p. 724) Tod of Pennsylvania (p. 725) Hamilton of South Carolina (p. 726) What is the position of each speaker? Summarize the key points of the debate.

8 © 2001, J. Douglass Klein Find the other person (in a few cases, 2 other people) with your same first letter (A-E) and same number (1 or 2). Write a paragraph or two summarizing, in your own words, the key points in your section of the debate: A1, A2 Clark (2 speeches) B1, B2 Todd C1, C2 Hamilton, Part 1 D1, D2 Hamilton, Part 2 E1, E2 Hamilton, Part 3 Post it to the HOUSE DEBATE discussion board, with the subject being your GROUP number: e.g. A1, B2, etc. SIGN YOUR NAMES

9 © 2001, J. Douglass Klein Form the group of 5 (or in a few cases, 6) with the same SECOND letter (U,V,W,X). Take turns explaining each part of the debate. Compose ONE document for your team by pasting together (and EDITING as necessary, based on your group’s discussion) the five pieces to come up with one full summary of the debate. Post this to the discussion board with the subject heading GROUP U (or V,W,X). Sign names. We should end up with 4 full summaries.

10 © 2001, J. Douglass Klein The Tariff Bill Clark of New York (p. 724) Clark advocates moderating the proposed increase in the tariff on iron. “What is that object [of the tariff], sir? … (724) “But when you propose a tax on this article, which will bear so heavily upon the farmer, and do so much to empty his pockets, I shall use my feeble efforts against it.” (725)

11 © 2001, J. Douglass Klein The Tariff Bill Tod replies to Clark. (p. 725) “dismayed as I am at the time and manner of his renewing this discussion, I am still more dismayed at his arguments.” (725) “If supported and protected, they [iron workers] will add more real strength and wealth to our country, than the cultivation here of all the cotton raised on this continent, and Egypt and Bengal put together, could possibly do; for this work is carried on by free labor, [and] that [work is carried on] by slaves.” (726)

12 © 2001, J. Douglass Klein The Tariff Bill Hamilton of South Carolina (p. 726) Remarked on the “...general principles of the bill, which he reprehended” (726) “[Webster]... had … exhausted the topic … he [Mr. H] participated in the pleasure which all had enjoyed, in hearing the unanswerable argument of [Webster] (an argument that had scarcely left the honorable Speaker [Mr. Clay] an inch of ground to stand upon, notwithstanding the vigor and elasticity of his [Mr. C’s] genius)….”

13 © 2001, J. Douglass Klein The Tariff Bill Hamilton of South Carolina (p. 726) Read and understand: “…if Adam Smith could have risen from his grave...” (727) “…there are a few salutary truths…” (bottom of 727) “…if there is any truth which appears to be sustained...” (728) “…as clear and emphatic as Mr. [Alexander] Hamilton was…” (728)

14 © 2001, J. Douglass Klein Documents Relative to the Manufactures Read and understand: “...the pockets of those that earned the money are the best repository for the same.” (773) “...we have many men in our country which know nothing about the earning of the money they have in their hands …. Such men I consider dangerous….” (773) Letter from John Quimby

15 © 2001, J. Douglass Klein Documents Relative to Manufactures “…if … it is found that the interests of the many have been sacrificed, and colossal fortunes thereby erected, for the exclusive benefit of the few, the fact calls upon Government to correct the existing evil by equalizing the burden.” - Henry Stark (684)

16 © 2001, J. Douglass Klein Documents Relative to the Manufactures Read and understand: “...the pockets of those that earned the money are the best repository for the same.” (773) “...we have many men in our country which know nothing about the earning of the money they have in their hands …. Such men I consider dangerous….” (773) Letter from John Quimby

17 © 2001, J. Douglass Klein Predatory Pricing Time Profit Normal A. Hamilton’s view Smith’s view Predatory Pricing

18 © 2001, J. Douglass Klein Eagle Iron Works, p. 291 “…I would be annually sinking money, under a protection of 12 1/2 percent. If the General Government, or some file leader of the anti- tariffists, would purchase my property at a fair valuation, I would … cheerfully undertake merchandising, and enjoy thereat the sweets of life, and at the same time educate my family, and clear more money with the capital vested in those works; but a repeal of the duty on iron, without a sale, completely nullifies the capital, for the property is generally calculated for iron works, and would then be come no object to any man of business.” Some, with good access to resources, would survive and prosper.

19 © 2001, J. Douglass Klein Nullification SC essentially seceded. Compromise tariff of 1833 began slow reduction of rates.

20 © 2001, J. Douglass Klein Assignment Be prepared to re-create the debate between Dudley (representing the protectionists in the US) and Rawlins (representing British free-traders).


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