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Www.derby.ac.uk EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SCIENCES Using ICT to support dyslexic learners Sarah Charles and Ros Clark University of Derby.

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Presentation on theme: "Www.derby.ac.uk EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SCIENCES Using ICT to support dyslexic learners Sarah Charles and Ros Clark University of Derby."— Presentation transcript:

1 EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SCIENCES Using ICT to support dyslexic learners Sarah Charles and Ros Clark University of Derby

2 EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SCIENCES A little bit about us…..

3 EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SCIENCES Aim of the session To raise awareness of ICT based strategies that can be used to reduce barriers to learning for students with dyslexia

4 EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SCIENCES What is dyslexia?

5 EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SCIENCES What is dyslexia? “Although dyslexia was first reported over 100 years ago, there has been, and still is, much confusion as to what dyslexia actually is.” (Milne 2005) “Dyslexia is typically thought to be a reading and writing disorder.” (Berninger 2008)

6 EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SCIENCES “Dyslexia is best described as a specific difficulty in learning, in one or more of reading, spelling and written language which may be accompanied by difficulty in number work, short-term memory, sequencing, auditory and/or visual perception, and motor skills. It is particularly related to mastering and using written language – alphabetic, numeric and musical notation. In addition, oral language is often affected to some degree.” (BDA 2012)

7 EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SCIENCES The dyslexic myth? “Dyslexia is a myth invented by education chiefs to cover up poor teaching methods.” (Stringer 2009) "Dyslexia, as commonly understood, is a myth, and a myth which hides the scale and scandal of true reading disability." (Elliot 2005)

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13 EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SCIENCES Areas of difficulty for students “Letters jumping off pages and blurriness, not being able to see gaps clearly between letters…..my spelling.” “I’m slow at reading compared to my peers… I have memory processing problems, poor short term memory…. too many questions in my head…. can’t remember formulas for maths.” “My organisation of thoughts is slow….reading is slow.” “Getting words and letters the right way round…. Letters and words are reversed when I read them.” “Can’t get ideas down on paper….speed and rate of learning is slow….spend longer processing information…..low reading age.”

14 EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SCIENCES Removing Barriers A structured system of identification and assessment needs to be developed for each university in order to support dyslexic students effectively. (Reid 2009)

15 EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SCIENCES Traditional strategies/adjustments  Buff or cream background  Comic Sans or Arial in enlarged print  Minimal text/greater use of visual images  Writing on board in different coloured ink

16 EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SCIENCES Why ICT?

17 EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SCIENCES “… technological aids are revolutionising the efficiency of dyslexic people…” (Close 2006) “ICT is recognised as a key tool to help dyslexic learners in the classroom in both learning and teaching experiences, as well as accessing or recording written information. When ICT is used effectively, many of the barriers to and differences in learning can be reduced or overcome.” (Crivelli 2006)

18 EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SCIENCES Benefits of ICT in Inclusive Teaching ICT can be used to: –Provide alternative forms of communication for children –Enable access to the curriculum –Create differentiated and multi-sensory resources –Present learning in an individually preferred style

19 EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SCIENCES Key Considerations The ICT demands from activities must be appropriate to the ICT capability of the child Other children should not be denied access to using ICT in their learning

20 EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SCIENCES Speaking and Listening Remove barriers to writing by recording Voice recorders Easispeak Talking tins Windows voice recorder Talking faces Talking tutor

21 EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SCIENCES nloads.shtml#talkingfaces

22 EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SCIENCES language---talking-tutor.pdf Talking tutor

23 EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SCIENCES Screen readers Examples of text to speech tools: Orato Claro Read e#p/c/1A31CA479D1F8699/0/dG889VWJs B0

24 EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SCIENCES Talking word processors/ on screen word banks Examples of talking word processors: Clicker er/special-needs/clicker-symbols/clicker- symbols.aspx Talking First Word Textease

25 EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SCIENCES Other tools available: T- Bar Rapid set Vu bar 4.5 sistive.htm

26 EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SCIENCES Spell checkers Franklin Children’s dictionary and spellchecker ‘Ginger’ is a freely downloadable spellchecker, with speech support, that may be a good alternative to spellchecking in MS word. Available at

27 EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SCIENCES 27 Using Mind Mapping

28 EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SCIENCES Why mind map? Why is mind mapping useful? To plan, add and sort ideas : Into categories Into relationships Visual information: Easier to digest Can add symbols/pictures Can add colour For revision: Information easier to digest Pictures/keywords trigger facts Colour and visuals aid memory

29 EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SCIENCES Using Mind Mapping Inspiration 8 (free trial at Sparkspace Kidspiration 3

30 EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SCIENCES ICT and dyslexia With appropriate programs and ICT tools pupils will: Gain confidence and have a go Work independently on tasks Demonstrate what they can do and know Overcome frustration and raise self- esteem Become less tired

31 EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SCIENCES ICT that is ‘dyslexia friendly’ Options for full speech Opportunity to review or repeat Options to alter font, size, colour, and background Record keeping where appropriate Clear instructions, navigation tools and menus Unclutter screens

32 EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SCIENCES IWBs can reduce visual stress Change the background colour Use dyslexia friendly fonts e.g. comic sans, Sassoon Use IWB tools e.g. reveal blind, spotlight, magnifier

33 EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SCIENCES Practical Strategies - Hardware Make icons on screen larger Change size of fonts Change contrast of text and background Change speed of mouse Change number of clicks on mouse Letters on keyboard/use of concept keyboards/textured keys

34 EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SCIENCES Software Remove tools from toolbars Choose simple or advanced set-ups Create document templates Specific SEN software Supporting the wider role of the teacher -IEP Writer

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36 EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SCIENCES Close, S. (2006) Dyslexia and Technology Aids in the Workplace. Patoss, 19 (1), pp 62 – 68. Crivelli, V. (2006) How Technology can Support Dyslexic learners Patoss, 19 (2), pp 65 – 68. Keates, A. (2000) Dyslexia and information and communications technology: a guide for teachers and parents. London: David Fulton. Sands, S. and Buchholz, E. S. (1997) The underutilization of computers to assist in the remediation of dyslexia.International Journal of Instructional Media, 24(2), 153–175. University of Nottingham Mental Health, Hidden Disabilities and Learning Support Project (2001) Supporting dyslexic students in the use of IT: an information literacy approach. University of Nottingham.


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