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And among the ballads published, the Robin Hood ballads are of special significance. Robin Hood, the famous outlaw welcomed by the poor was a half-historical.

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Presentation on theme: "And among the ballads published, the Robin Hood ballads are of special significance. Robin Hood, the famous outlaw welcomed by the poor was a half-historical."— Presentation transcript:

1 And among the ballads published, the Robin Hood ballads are of special significance. Robin Hood, the famous outlaw welcomed by the poor was a half-historical and half-legendary hero. He and his men lived in the forest, fighting with the oppressors and protecting the poor and the oppressed. Popular Ballad

2 Robin Hood and the Three Squires Robin Hood and the Three Squires 1 There are twelve months in all the year, As I hear many men say, But the merriest month in all the year Is the merry month of May. Notes : 1. It is one of the more effective among the Robin Hood ballads, showing how Robin Hood disguised himself and saved the lives of the three squires who had been sentenced to death because of their killing of the king ' s deer. The stanza used here is typical of most ballads, i. e. quatrains with the first and third lines containing four stresses and the first and the second and forth lines three stresses, and with rimes occurring in the even - numbered lines

3 Now Robin Hood is to Nottingham gone, With a link - a - down and a - day 2, And there he met a silly 3 old woman, Was weeping on the way. 2. With a link - a - down and a - day : From the second stanza to the last, the ballad is divided into three parts, and each part begins with almost the same two lines “ Now Robin Hood … and a - day ”. “ With a link - a - down and a - day ” is a refrain, sung by the audience together with the ballad singer. 3. silly : poor, innocent Robin Hood and the Three Squires Notes :

4 “ What news ? what news, thou silly old woman ? What news hast thou for me ?” Said she, “ There ' s three squires in Nottingham town, Today is condemned to dee 4.” 4. dee : die Robin Hood and the Three Squires Notes :

5 “ O have they parishes burnt ?” he said, “ Or have they ministers 5 slain ? Or have they robbed any virgin, Or with other men ' s wives have lain 6 ?” 5. minister : clergyman 6. lain : past participle of “ lie ”. The phrase lie with means to make love with. Robin Hood and the Three Squires Notes :

6 “ O what have they done ?” said bold Robin Hood, “ I pray thee tell to me.” “ It ' s for slaying of the king ' s fallow 7 deer, Bearing their longbows with thee 8.” 7. fallow : brown - red 8. Bearing their longbows with thee : carrying long bows like you Robin Hood and the Three Squires Notes :

7 Robin Hood and the Three Squires

8 “ Dost thou not mind 9, old woman,” he said, “ Since 10 thou made me sup and dine ? By the truth of my body,” quoth 11 bold Robin Hood, “ You could not tell it in better time.” Robin Hood and the Three Squires 9. Dose thou not mind : don ' t you remember 10. Since : Before 11. quoth : said Notes :

9 Now Robin Hood is to Nottingham gone, With a link - a - down and a - day, And there he met with a silly old palmer 12, Was walking along the highway. Robin Hood and the Three Squires Notes : 12. a silly old palmer : a poor old pilgrim

10 “ What news ? what news, thou silly old man ? What news, I do thee pray ?” Said he, “ Three squires in Nottingham town Are condemned to die this day.” Robin Hood and the Three Squires

11 “ Come change thine 13 apparel with me, old man, Come change thine apparel for mine. Here is forty shillings in good silver, Go drink it in beer or wine.” Robin Hood and the Three Squires Notes : 13. thine : your. “ Thine ” is used before vowels and “ thy ” before consonance

12 “ O thine apparel is good,” he said, “ And mine is ragged and torn. Wherever you go, wherever you ride, Laugh ne ' er an old man to scorn 14.” Robin Hood and the Three Squires Notes : 14. laugh ne ' er an old man to scorn : Never to jeer at an old man

13 “ Come change thine apparel with me, old churl 15, Come change thine apparel with mine : Here are twenty pieces of good broad gold, Go feast thy brethren 16 with wine.” Robin Hood and the Three Squires Notes : 15. old churl : old fellow 16. brethren : the plural form for “ brother ”

14 Then he put on the old man ' s hat, It stood full high on the crown 17 : “ The first bold bargain that I come at, It shall made thee 18 come down.” Robin Hood and the Three Squires Notes : 17. on the crown : on the head 18. thee : the hat

15 Then he put on the old man ' s cloak, Was patched 19 black, blue, and red ; He thought it no shame, all the day long To wear the bags of bread 20. Robin Hood and the Three Squires Notes : 19. Was patched : which was patched 20. the bags of bread : The black, blue, and red patches sewed to the old man ' s cloak serve as bags to carry bread

16 Then he put on the old man ' s breeks 21, Was patched from ball up 22 to side ; “ By the truth of my body,” bold Robin can say 23, “ This man loved little pride !” Robin Hood and the Three Squires Notes : 21. breeks : underbreeches 22. ball up : center 23. can say : did say

17 Then he put on the old man ' s hose 24, Were patched from knee to wrist 25 ; “ By the truth of my body,” said bold Robin Hood, “ I ' d laugh if I had any list 26 !” Robin Hood and the Three Squires Notes : 24. hose : a covering for the leg or foot 25. wrist : ( here ) ankle 26. list : desire

18 Then he put on the old man ' s shoes, Were patched both beneath and aboon 27 : The Robin Hood swore a solemn oath, “ It ' s good habit 28 that makes a men.” Robin Hood and the Three Squires Notes : 27. aboon : above 28. habit : clothing

19 Now Robin Hood is to Nottingham gone, With a link - a - down and a - down, And there he met with the proud Sheriff, Was walking along the town. Robin Hood and the Three Squires

20 “ O Christ you save 29, O Sheriff,” he said, “ O Christ you save and see : And what will you give to a silly old man Today will your hangman be ?” Robin Hood and the Three Squires Notes : 29. O Christ you save : O Christ save you

21 “ Some suits 30, some suits,” the Sheriff he said, “ Some suits I ' ll give to thee ; Some suits, some suits, and pence thirteen, Today ' s a hangman ' s fee.” Robin Hood and the Three Squires Notes : 30. Some suits : suits from the condemned

22 Then Robin he 31 turns him round about, And jumps from stock 32 to stone ; “ By the truth of my body,” the Sheriff he said, “ That ' s well jumped, thou nimble old man.” Robin Hood and the Three Squires Notes : 31. he : Robin Hood. “ then Robin he turns ” shows the case of pleonasm in rhetoric. 32. stock : stump

23 “ I was ne ' er a hangman in all my life, Nor yet intends to trade 33. But cursed be he,” said bold Robin, “ That first a hangman was made. Robin Hood and the Three Squires Notes : 33. to trade : to be engaged in the trade of hanging people

24 “ I ' ve a bag for meal, and a bag for malt, And a bag for barley and corn ; A bag for bread, and a bag for beef, And a bag for my little small horn. Robin Hood and the Three Squires

25 “ I have a horn in my pocket, I got it from Robin Hood ; And still when I set it to my mouth, For thee it blows little good.” Robin Hood and the Three Squires

26 “ O wind thy horn 34, thou proud fellow, Of thee I have no doubt 35 ; I wish that thou give such a blast Till both thy eyes fall out.” Notes : Robin Hood and the Three Squires 34. wind thy horn : blow your horn 35. Of thee I have no doubt : I have no fear of you

27 The first loud blast that he did blow, He blew both loud and shrill ; A hundred and forty of Robin Hood ' s men Came riding over the hill. Robin Hood and the Three Squires

28 The next loud blast that he did give, He blew both loud and amain 36 ; And quickly sixty of Robin Hood ' s men Came shining 37 over the plain. Notes : Robin Hood and the Three Squires 36. amain : with main force, violently 37. shining : making a brave show

29 “ O who are yon,” the Sheriff he said, “ Come tripping over the lea 38 ?” “ They ' re my attendants,” brave Robin did say, “ They ' ll pay a visit to thee.” Notes : Robin Hood and the Three Squires 38. lea : meadow

30 They took the gallows from the slack 39, They set it in the glen 40 ; They hanged the proud Sheriff on that, Released their own three men. Notes : Robin Hood and the Three Squires 39. slack : a small shallow dell 40. glen : a narrow valley


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