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UAS: teaching in schools Penny Gowland Sir Peter Mansfield Magnetic Resonance Centre School of Physics and Astronomy University of Nottingham.

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Presentation on theme: "UAS: teaching in schools Penny Gowland Sir Peter Mansfield Magnetic Resonance Centre School of Physics and Astronomy University of Nottingham."— Presentation transcript:

1 UAS: teaching in schools Penny Gowland Sir Peter Mansfield Magnetic Resonance Centre School of Physics and Astronomy University of Nottingham

2 How it fits into our degree Selecting schools and students Activities undertaken Assessment Impact on staff

3 How it fits into the degree Communicating Science 10 credit module – (120 credits per year) Only taken by B.Sc. Students –M.Sci. fourth year taught by student centred learning- same transferable skills Replaces half of the third year project lab –They take second semester lab taken by some ‘Physics with-’ students

4 Selecting Students and Schools

5 Selecting students Original plan: 6 students (9 this year) Good record of handing in coursework on time Application form –Statement judged on previous initiative shown –We are here to offer opportunities I’d prefer drawing lots CRB check 50% at end of second year –(2ii borderline) –Weaker students will need to concentrate on their studies

6 Selecting students Original plan: 6 students (9 this year) Good record of handing in coursework on time Application form –Statement judged on previous initiative shown –We are here to offer opportunities I’d prefer drawing lots CRB check 50% at end of second year –(2ii borderline) –Weaker students will need to concentrate on their studies

7 Finding schools Widening participation unit Previous contacts (work experience!) Cold calling –Be confident Phone at a sensible time (many teachers do not use ) Try to speak directly to teacher and not leave a message Do not give them a chance to phone you back.. Offer to go in straight away

8 Types of schools used Primary Comprehensive ? CTC Sixth form college (+ secondary school) ? Museum So far we have not attempted to ‘select’ schools –Widening participation remit –Benefits of variety One school has asked for £400

9 Departments used Physics (A’ level) Science (< GCSE) Maths (primary) ? Other (primary) –Art- light and colour –Music –sound –History ? Other (sixth form) –Biology- biophysics, physiology, medical –Chemistry

10 Typical activities

11 Observation 2 weeks A variety of teachers, sets and ages Active targets set Talk to students about learning –Why do you like physics? –What is it like at University? Different teaching approaches Student briefed in advance on topic of lesson

12 Teaching assistant 6 weeks Helping with set problems Helping with practical work ‘Mucking in’ Hotspots

13 Take 10 minutes of lesson Presentation (ppt) on broader application of topic of interest Practical demonstration using equipment from University –Would like at least one practical activity from them during the term Talk on University life/ applications etc Talk on careers

14 Hotspot

15 Special project 1 week (near Christmas) Take ~ 1 lesson using novel methods to communicate or teach physics or physics ideas –Angles –Bridge building competition –Light theatre

16 Special project (primary) Model race track used to teach angle Extended to teaching algebra Modified as it became clear it was too difficult

17 Special project (primary)

18 Special Project (Secondary) Bridge building competition Module on forces Special-needs team won

19 Special Project (secondary) Using school theatre to investigate light and colour ‘Sound and light’ show Accompanying work book

20 Other activities Visit to university –Linked to IoP Physics Centre lectures Competitions –Physics Olympiad Model aeroplane club Help with A’level options

21 Assessment

22 Assessment: Diary Akin to Lab Diary, recording all activities, preparation and observations Brief outline of planned lesson and learning objectives General description of lesson Student’s targets and outcomes Notes on teacher’s methods Deliberate mistakes Description of student’s activities

23 Assessment: Diary targets Maths and practical work in physics Qualitative targets –Do pupils know their multiplication tables? –How long does it take class to settle down? –Do pupils convert x to muliple +? –Do the class wander around? –What is ratio of boys to girls in different sets/ages –How are pupils who do well rewarded if at all –Is it raining? –What fraction of the class will ask questions? –What is fraction of time spent on group teaching compared to individual work? –What fraction of students use units?

24 Diary- secondary Lesson breakdown Lesson contents General obs. and teaching methods My rôle

25 Diary I left this class because the teacher was attempting to determine if they were working to level 5, which I could not help with As most of the class seemed to know what they were doing, I asked them about the experimental design

26 Diary Targets My rôle

27 Oral presentation Previous remit: discuss any aspect of module –Learning styles –Disruptive children –Maths in physics Now: Detailed description of special project –aims/targets, learning outcomes –underlying science explanation of main concepts at a variety of ages common misconceptions activities typically used –teaching methods and reasoning, materials used, safety –Analysis of reception based on outcome measures. Hardcopy of slides

28 Essay/ report < 3000 words Summary (~100 words- for UAS) –What did you gain from the experience? –Did the experience help you to make up your mind about teaching –Did you increase your transferable skills –How did this module differ from other modules on offer and what made you choose it?

29 Essay/ report Introduction –General information about school, classes and topics with which you worked –Previous relevant experience Detailed description of your own activities –Week by week diary summary –Hotspots and special project briefly

30 Essay/ report General teaching and learning of science at school for topic(s) you were involved with –underlying science –evolution of syllabus across ages –common misconceptions –activities typically used in this area –teaching methods and activities observed and participated in. Safety issues –Targets, and progress in acquisition of and development of skills.

31 Essay/ report Conclusion –How the module helped you achieve your learning objectives

32 Impact on staff

33 Staff requirements Contacts and visits to schools –2.5 hours per student in first year with school –20 minutes per student in second year with school –My own teaching load did not allow me to visit students in schools Training –6 hours initially –2 hours at week 5 on Powerpoint –10 mins of tutorials at 3 and 8 weeks per student Module documentation –2 weeks in first year –2 days subsequently

34 Staff requirements- assessment 30 minutes per student for presentation 1.5 hours per student for marking report 1 hours per student for marking diary Double marking

35 Staff requirements Administration of students (secretarial) –Handling applications –Handling CRB –Contacting students for school visits CRB checks (Widening participation unit)

36 Benefits for University Staff ‘Teaching is learning twice’ –Review of my own teaching methods Working with a new group of professionals Knowledge of the dreadful working conditions of most teachers –Prep areas are DREARY, DIRTY and UNTIDY

37 Conclusion

38 Mistakes not to make Do not ask a teacher to phone you back Do not contact a teacher by Do not promise any student a place until you have their exam results and you have a placement school Organize CRB checks before the end of exams Do not accept Microsoft files electronically off students

39 Mistakes not to make Do not ask a teacher to phone you back Do not contact a teacher by Do not promise any student a place until you have their exam results and you have a placement school Organize CRB checks before the end of exams Do not accept Microsoft files electronically off students


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