Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Nutrition Service Providers Guide Barbara Kamp, MS, RD National Resource Center on Nutrition, Physical Activity & Aging 4th State Units on Aging Nutritionists.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Nutrition Service Providers Guide Barbara Kamp, MS, RD National Resource Center on Nutrition, Physical Activity & Aging 4th State Units on Aging Nutritionists."— Presentation transcript:

1 Nutrition Service Providers Guide Barbara Kamp, MS, RD National Resource Center on Nutrition, Physical Activity & Aging 4th State Units on Aging Nutritionists & Administrators Conference August 2006

2 The Challenge From the Science … to Policy … to the Public … … to “Me”

3 Nutrition Service Providers Guide  Provides assistance in applying the Dietary Guidelines for Americans to: Programs Group Menu Planning Food Production Food Service  Parallels messages from other materials

4 Nutrition Service Providers Guide AoA & National Resource Center on Nutrition, Physical Activity & Aging Input - n4a, NANASP Reviewed - SUA nutritionists Reviewed - HHS Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

5 Nutrition Service Providers Guide Part I  Purpose  History & Process  Importance  Implementation

6 Importance Good nutrition is vital to health Older adults need nutritious, tasty, culturally appropriate, safe meals for successful aging DGAs help assure appropriate food choices to ensure DRIs are met

7 Nutrition Service Providers Guide Implementation  General DGAs  Program Planning Considerations for OAA Nutrition Programs  Tips for Meal Planning  Resources

8 Key Recommendation: Adequate Nutrients Within Calorie Needs Consume a variety of nutrient-dense foods and beverages within and among the basic food groups while choosing foods that limit intake of saturated and trans fat, cholesterol, added sugars, salt, & alcohol

9 Program Planning Consideration Provide meals that include all food groups Provide meals & beverages high in nutrients but within calorie needs of program participants (nutrient dense) Provide opportunities for food choices based on individual needs & cultural food preferences

10 Tips for Meal Planning Seek menu ideas from program participants Choose foods with little or no added sugar, sodium or fat Control portion sizes to control calories and meal costs Limit use of processed food items

11 Resources Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2005  Appendices A and B  5 A Day for Better Health Program, tips and recipes 

12 Key Recommendation: Adequate Nutrients Within Calorie Needs Meet recommended intakes within energy needs by adopting a balanced eating pattern, such as the DASH Diet Plan or the USDA Food Guide

13 Program Planning Considerations DASHUSDA Food GuideUse DASH Plan or USDA Food Guide Both plans take into consideration a range of calorie levels to meet the nutrient needs of men and women at various ages and activity levels Provide meals in a calorie range of 550 – 700 calories per meal; the daily recommended level is 1600 to 2000 calories depending on level of activity

14 Tips for Meal Planning Use lists of foods rich in selected nutrients (see DGAs appendices & tables) Use standardized recipes & portion sizes specified in recipes Identify high sodium foods; offer them infrequently; & offer lower sodium alternatives Identify & offer high potassium foods

15 Resources USDA – MyPyramid.gov  What counts as…. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2005  Appendices A and B 

16 Key Recommendation: Adequate Nutrients Within Calorie Needs People over age 50 People over age 50 Consume vitamin B-12 in its crystalline form (fortified foods or supplements)

17 Program Planning Considerations Use fortified foods to meet the vitamin B-12 requirements since man people over age 50 have reduced ability to absorb naturally occurring vitamin B-12

18 Tips for Meal Planning Include fortified ready to eat whole grain cereals for breakfast meals Use fortified ready to eat whole grain cereals in casseroles, in meatloaves, or as breading for fish Use fortified ready to eat whole grain cereals in baked goods, i.e. crisp toppings, muffins, cookies

19 Resources National Institute of Health: Office of Dietary Supplements

20 Key Recommendation: Adequate Nutrients Within Calorie Needs Older adults Older adults Consume extra vitamin D from vitamin D-fortified food and/or supplements

21 Program Planning Considerations Select foods rich in vitamin D, a nutrient important for optimal calcium absorption and muscle functioning Include vitamin D fortified low-fat or fat- free milk, soy beverage, or orange juice with each meal

22 Tips for Meal Planning Provide low-fat, vitamin D-fortified soy beverage or lactose-free milk as an alternate for those who are lactose intolerant Include vitamin D fortified, ready to eat whole grain cereal in food products such as muffins, crisps, or cookies

23 Resources National Institute of Health: Office of Dietary Supplements

24 Key Recommendation: Sodium & Potassium Choose and prepare foods with little salt. At the same time, consume potassium- rich foods, such as fruits and vegetables Older adults. Older adults. Aim to consume no more than 1,500 mg of sodium per day, and meet the potassium recommendation (4,700 mg/day) with food

25 Program Planning Considerations ~10% sodium naturally in foods ~ % added during processing Use “no added salt” or “low- sodium” Prepare foods without adding salt Serve potassium rich fruits & vegetables frequently

26 Tips for Meal Planning Prepare baked or boiled potatoes instead of boxed mashed potatoes Select fresh or frozen vegetables or low sodium canned vegetables Use fresh or frozen lean meats instead of cured cuts of meat Avoid processed meats or pre-prepared items

27 Resources DASH Eating Plan hbp/prevent/sodium/sodium.htmhbp/prevent/sodium/sodium.htm Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2005  Appendix B-1 Food Sources of Potassium  Table 15: Range of Sodium Content for Selected Foods

28 Part II

29 Nutrition Service Providers Guide Part II - Application  Menu Development DASH Meal Plan USDA Food Guide Meal Plan Sample Menus at Calories DRIs Recipes & Menu Analysis

30 Meal Planning Guides Meal patterns – planning not compliance Two recommended, SUA choice  DASH Eating Plan  DASH Eating Plan calorie range: 1,600 to 3,100 calorie levels  USDA Food Guide Meal Plan  USDA Food Guide Meal Plan calorie range: 1,000 to 3,200 calorie levels

31 DASH Meal Pattern Promotes  Grains  Vegetables  Fruits  Nuts & seeds  Legumes  Non & Low-fat dairy foodsLimits  Meat  Fish  Poultry  Fats  Sweets  Sodium DASH Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension

32 USDA Food Guide Meal Plan Grains  Whole grain, Other grains Vegetables  Dark green, Orange, Legumes, Starchy, Other Fruits Milk Lean meat & beans Oils Discretionary calorie allowance

33 Menus Center designed Menus Nutrient analysis using Food Processor by ESHA All foods & ingredients selected are USDA standard

34 Computer Assisted Analysis vs Meal Pattern Creative Solutions Meal Patterns: Only a First Step in Menu Planning Designed 2 menus  Met meal pattern & met RDA / AI  Met meal pattern & DID NOT met RDA / AI _solutions/meal_patterns.asp

35 Targets Vitamins  A, B 6, B 12, C, D, E Minerals  Calcium, potassium, sodium Fiber Saturated Fat & Cholesterol

36 Menu Development: Appeal Variety of Foods Different forms, shapes, textures, colors Different Temperatures Vary flavors w/in meal & day to day Seasonal, traditional, ethnic foods

37 Menu Development: Nutrition Caloric range Limit fat, cholesterol, sodium Adequate protein & carbohydrate Increased fiber Adequate vitamins & minerals

38 Chicken Menu Chicken Menu Emphasis: Sodium, calcium, calories, beans Stewed chicken with vegetables  2oz chicken + 1/2 vegetables + broth = 1cup Egg noodles (1 cup) Five bean salad (1/2 cup) Fresh fruit salad with citrus and yogurt dip (1/2 cup, includes melons, orange, grapes + 2 TB yogurt dip) Fat-free milk (1 cup)

39 Chicken Menu Standard Meal Content Calories kcal584 kcal % fat 30-35%22 % Fiber7 – 8 g10 g Calcium400 mg507 mg Potassium1566 mg916 mg Sodium500 mg254 mg

40 Meatloaf Sandwich Meatloaf Sandwich Special emphasis: whole grains, fruit, vitamin E, calcium Open-faced Meatloaf Sandwich  2 oz meatloaf w/ 1 sl. 7 grain bread Gravy (2 Tb) Baked Winter Squash (1/2 cup) Waldorf Salad on Greens (1/2 cup, apples, walnuts, raisins on romaine) Orange Rice Pudding (1/2 cup) Fat-free Milk (1 cup)

41 Meatloaf Meal Standard Meal Content Calories kcal834 kcal % Fat 30-35%18% Fiber7 – 8 g9 g Calcium400 mg1129 mg Potassium1566 mg1666 mg Sodium500 mg627 mg

42 Turkey Menu Turkey Menu Special Emphasis: Fiber, potassium, sodium, vitamin E Roast turkey (2 oz) Baked sweet potato (1 small) Broccoli (1/2 cup) Whole wheat roll (1 2.5” roll) Apple raisin Crisp (1/2 cup, includes topping of whole wheat flour, fortified flake cereal; almonds & raisins) Fat-free milk (1 cup)

43 Turkey Menu Standard Meal Content Calories kcal724 kcal % Fat 30-35%25 % Fiber7 – 8 g13 g Calcium400 mg630 mg Potassium1566 mg1763 mg Sodium500 mg423 mg

44 Nutrition Service Providers Guide Print copy: late September 2006 Online version: Other resources: Toolkit, Chapter 4


Download ppt "Nutrition Service Providers Guide Barbara Kamp, MS, RD National Resource Center on Nutrition, Physical Activity & Aging 4th State Units on Aging Nutritionists."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google