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Upcoming Meal Pattern Changes for 2014-15 Breakfast and Lunch California Department of Education Nutrition Services Division.

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Presentation on theme: "Upcoming Meal Pattern Changes for 2014-15 Breakfast and Lunch California Department of Education Nutrition Services Division."— Presentation transcript:

1 Upcoming Meal Pattern Changes for Breakfast and Lunch California Department of Education Nutrition Services Division

2 Overview Breakfast Changes Breakfast Offer versus Serve, Signage Lunch changes Reducing Sodium

3 Breakfast Meal Pattern and Overlap Meal Pattern and Overlap Breakfast K-12K-5K Calories Fruit5 c per week (1 c per day) Grains 9-10 / wk (1 per day min) 7-10 / wk (1 per day min) 8-10 / wk (1 per day min) 8-10 / wk (1 per day min) 9-10 / wk (1 per day min) 9-10 / wk (1 per day min) Milk5 c (1 c per day) Sodium – Target 1 Effective July 1, 2014 ≤ 540 mg (Target I) ≤ 540 mg (Target I) ≤ 600 mg (Target I) ≤ 640 mg (Target I) Saturated Fat< 10% of Calories Trans FatNutrition label or manufacture specification must indicate zero grams of trans fat (< 0.5 grams) per serving

4 Breakfast—Fruit School Year 2014–15 Quantity increases to 1 cup/day Student must take at least ½ cup fruit/vegetables No maximum limit fruit/vegetables Limitation on juice – Half fruit offerings over the week can be juice

5 Breakfast—Fruit Frozen fruit with added sugar – Allowed permanently Dried fruit – Credits for double the amount offered

6 Breakfast—Starchy Vegetable Options As a Substitute for fruit Is counted towards fruit component Is counted for Offer versus Serve purposes Is counted towards weekly dietary specifications As an Additional (extra) food Not counted towards fruits component Not counted for Offer versus Serve purposes Is counted towards weekly dietary specifications * If substituted for fruit, the first two cups per week must be from dark green, red/orange, beans/peas or the “Other” vegetables subgroup.

7 Questions – What is the required serving size of fruit for breakfast for all grade groups for 2014 – 15? a) ¼ cup b) ½ cup c) ¾ cup d) 1 cup

8 Breakfast—Grains SY , all of the grains offered must be WGR – WGR – at least 50% grains whole grain Weekly grain range: – K grains – grains – grains

9 Questions What is the daily minimum ounce equivalent (oz. eq.) grains that must be offered for grades K–8? a) 1 oz. eq. b) 2 oz. eq. What is the daily minimum ounce equivalent grains that must be offered for grades 9–12? a) 1 oz. eq. b) 2 oz. eq.

10 Questions Over the week, what percentage of your oz. eq. grains must be WGR for ? a) 25% b) 50% c) 75% d) 100%

11 Breakfast—Meat/Meat Alternates Options Substitute for grains Is counted towards grains component Is counted for Offer versus Serve purposes Is counted towards weekly dietary specifications Additional food Not counted towards grains component Not counted for Offer versus Serve purposes Is counted towards weekly dietary specifications *Must offer minimum 1 ounce equivalent grain/day

12 Breakfast—Grains and M/MA - Example Substituting M/MA for grains Example: bean burrito, -1 oz. eq. grain and 1 oz. eq. M/MA substituting = 2 oz. eq. grains and 2 food items Additional M/MA Example: bean burrito, -1 oz. eq. grain and 1 oz. eq. M/MA additional = 1 oz. eq. grain and 1 food item

13 BREAKFAST—OFFER VERSUS SERVE DEFINITIONS Food Component: Food groups – Grains (optional meat/meat alternate) – Fruit (or vegetable substitutes) – Milk Food Item: A specific food offered within the three food components in the required minimum amount – Examples – 1 oz eq toast, ½ cup peaches, 1 cup milk

14 BREAKFAST—OFFER VERSUS SERVE Optional for all age groups Must offer at least 4 food items Students must take at least 3 food items – Including ½ cup fruit

15 Offer Versus Serve—Examples Example 1: Oatmeal (1/2 cup/1 oz. eq. grain)- 1 food item Apple slices (1/2 cup) - 1 food item Orange juice (1/2 cup)- 1 food item Milk (1 cup) - 1 food item 4 Food Items *Fruit may be split and count as 2 food items, ½ cup each

16 Offer Versus Serve—Examples Example 2: 4 oz Muffin (= 2 oz. eq. grains) - 2 food items ½ cup Banana - 1 food item ½ cup Apple Juice- 1 food item 1 cup Milk - 1 food item 5 Food Items *Students must take at least 3 food items

17 Offer Versus Serve—Examples Example 3: Cereal (1 oz. eq.)- 1 food item Toast (1 oz. eq.)- 1 food item Fruit (1 cup)- 1 food item Milk- 1 food item 4 Food Items *At discretion of the menu planner to allow duplicates for grains

18 Offer Versus Serve—Examples Example 4: Choice of entrée with 2 oz. eq. grains (2 food items) Breakfast burrito Yogurt and graham crackers Cereal and graham crackers Fruit (½ cup) 3 choices, may take 2 (2 food items) Milk (1 food item) 5 Food Items

19 USDA Offer Versus Serve Guidance Manual USDA Offer Versus Serve for SY on USDA’s Web page at – ance/Policy-Memos/2013/SP a.pdf USDA Q&A on the School Breakfast Program Meal Pattern in School Year

20 Question Under Offer versus Serve, a student must take milk as one of the food items. True False

21 Signage Placed in a visible location at or near the beginning of the serving line Indicate what is included as part of the meal Include number of choices of fruits and grains Include the minimum requirement for Offer Versus Serve

22 Poll Question – 4 and 5

23

24 Signage Entrée Items, may take 1 or 2 – Breakfast pizza * * – Yogurt * – Graham Crackers * Fruit, may take 1 or 2 – Fresh fruit * – Juice * Milk, may take 1 – Fat free chocolate – 1% low fat white * Take at least 3 stars (*) Must take at least 1 fruit

25 Breakfast Signage

26 LUNCH CHANGES All grains must be whole grain-rich Target 1 for average weekly sodium limit

27 Sodium Targets 27 SY Breakfast ≤540mg ( K-5) ≤600mg (6-8) ≤640mg (9-12) Lunch ≤1230mg (K-5) ≤1360mg (6-8) ≤1420mg (9-12) SY Breakfast ≤485mg ( K-5) ≤535mg (6-8) ≤570mg (9-12) Lunch ≤935mg (K-5) ≤1035mg (6-8) ≤1080mg (9-12) SY Breakfast ≤430mg ( K-5) ≤470mg (6-8) ≤500mg (9-12) Lunch ≤640mg (K-5) ≤710mg (6-8) ≤740mg (9-12)

28 Sodium – Introduction Function Dietary Guidelines – 2,300 mg/day Table salt – 1 tsp = 2,300 mg sodium

29 Sodium – Introduction Processed Food – Chemical ingredients: sweeteners, emulsifiers, stabilizers, buffers, thickeners, binders, preservatives

30 Sodium in the American Diet

31 Food Labeling: Identifying Low Sodium Foods ClaimDefinition Sodium free< 5 mg sodium per serving Low sodium< 140 mg sodium per serving Reduced/less sodium25% less sodium than reference Light in sodium, Lightly salted50% less sodium than reference Source: Food and Drug Administration website,

32

33 Reducing Sodium – Where Do I Start? Analyze menu if use menu analysis software Look up menu items – Nutrition Facts Label – Supertracker, https://www.supertracker.usda.gov/ Identify high/moderate/low sodium items Modify frequency of menu items Revamp recipes – use herbs, spices, and spice blends

34 Identify Lower Sodium Foods Dairy Which one is lower in sodium? Cheddar cheese American cheese

35 Identify Lower Sodium Foods Dairy Which one is lower in sodium? Cheddar cheese, 1 oz176 mg sodium American cheese, 1 oz372 mg sodium

36 Identify Lower Sodium Foods DairySodium Swiss cheese, 1 oz 54 mg Yogurt, 4 oz 66 mg Mozzarella Cheese, 1 oz150 mg Cheddar cheese, 1 oz176 mg Cottage cheese, 1/4 cup229 mg American cheese, 1 oz372 mg

37 Identify Lower Sodium Foods Dairy Choose These – Swiss cheese, Yogurt Watch Out – Mozzarella, Cheddar, Cottage cheese Limit – American cheese, Processed cheeses, Cheesy entrees

38 Identify Lower Sodium Foods Milk, 1 cupSodium White fat free 130 mg Chocolate fat free 150 mg White 1% low fat160 mg

39 Identify Lower Sodium Foods Protein Foods Which one is lower in sodium? Grilled chicken sandwich Deli ham sandwich

40 Identify Lower Sodium Foods Protein Foods Which one is lower in sodium? Grilled chicken sandwich 656 mg sodium Deli ham sandwich1098 mg sodium

41 Identify Lower Sodium Foods ProteinSodium Hamburger patty, 2 oz 112 mg Grilled chicken, 2 oz 111 mg Cooked dried beans, ½ cup 10 mg Canned pinto beans, ½ cup540 mg Deli ham, USDA, 2 oz 690 mg

42 Identify Lower Sodium Foods Protein Foods Choose These – Fresh beef, Fresh chicken, Ground meats Watch Out – Precooked meats, Canned beans Limit – Deli meats, Ham, Bacon, Sausage, Hot dogs, Breaded meats

43 Identify Lower Sodium Foods Grains Which one is lower in sodium? Bagel Blueberry muffin

44 Identify Lower Sodium Foods Grains Which one is lower in sodium? Bagel116 mg sodium Blueberry muffin416 mg sodium *Both examples provide 1 ounce equivalent grains

45 Identify Lower Sodium Foods GrainsSodium Rotini noodles, ½ cup 1 mg Whole wheat bread, 1 slice132 mg Cereal, cornflakes, 1 oz, 1 cup202 mg Biscuit, 2 ½ “335 mg

46 Identify Lower Sodium Foods Grains Choose These – Dried pasta, Whole grains such as rice Watch Out – Bread, Cereal Limit – Biscuits, Muffins, and Quick breads

47 Identify Lower Sodium Foods Vegetables Which one is lower in sodium? Fresh green beans Frozen green beans Low sodium canned green beans Canned green beans

48 Identify Lower Sodium Foods Vegetables Sodium Which one is lower in sodium? Fresh green beans 1 mg Frozen green beans 1 mg Reduced sodium canned green beans 140 mg Canned green beans 290 mg

49 Identify Lower Sodium Foods Vegetables Choose These – Fresh produce, Frozen vegetables, Low sodium canned vegetables Watch Out – Canned vegetables Limit – Prepared vegetable dishes, Sauces

50 Identify Lower Sodium Foods Fruits Naturally low in sodium!

51 Identify Lower Sodium Foods CondimentsSodium Ranch dressing, 1 Tbsp..174 mg Barbecue sauce, 1 Tbsp..175 mg Ketchup, 1 Tbsp..189 mg Louisiana hot sauce, 1 Tbsp..720 mg

52 Identify Lower Sodium Foods CondimentsSodium Soy sauce, 1 Tbsp mg “Less sodium” soy sauce, 1 Tbsp mg

53 Identify Lower Sodium Foods Condiments Choose These – Citrus, Lemon, Spices, Herbs Watch Out – Ketchup, Salad dressings Limit – Salt, Soy sauce, Barbecue sauce, Olives, Pickles

54 USDA Food Improvements - Reduced Sodium Low sodium in ALL canned vegetables Low‐sodium tomato products No salt added frozen and fresh vegetables Reduced‐sodium turkey ham Reduced‐sodium chicken fajita Reduced processed cheeses

55 Example: Middle School Lunch Sodium Limit1,360 mg - Milk, 1%160 - Fruit, fresh0 - Entrée (2 /3 – ¾)804 – Side dish (¼ - 1/3)300 – 396 *In this example, condiments are included in the entrée and side dish

56 Do the Math Before Bread, 2 slices264 Ham, 1 oz345 American cheese, 1 oz372 Milk, 1%160 Fruit, fresh0 Carrots with 2 Tbsp. ranch 348 Baked chips293 TOTAL SODIUM1, 782 mg After Bread, 2 slices264 Roast chicken, 1 oz111 Swiss cheese, 1 oz54 Milk, 1%160 Fruit, fresh0 Carrots with 2 Tbsp. hummus 73 TOTAL SODIUM662 mg

57 Flavoring Food Without Salt Herbs Spices DIY blends Citrus and acidity Pepper and heat Aromatics: onion, garlic, celery

58 Cook From Scratch Cut salt in recipes Test new recipes, use other flavorings Fewer “short-cup” ingredients – Premade sauces – Canned food items – refried and baked beans, etc. Limit processed foods

59 Create Appealing Trays

60 SUMMARY of CHANGES for SY BREAKFAST Fruit: Quantity increases to minimum 1 cup/day – Reimbursable meals must contain ½ cup fruit (or vegetable, if using substitution) – Limitation on Juice to 50% of offerings BREAKFAST AND LUNCH Grains: Must all be whole grain-rich Sodium: Target 1 for average weekly limit

61 Notifications on Updates in STEPP (School Training, Education, and Policy Priorities) Sign up to receive School Nutrition Programs information via at

62 Resources  USDA School Meals Guidance and Resources Web page  USDA Team Nutrition Web page at  USDA Best Practice Sharing Center’s Web page at

63 Resources  USDA’s Whole Grain Resource Web page at  Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction Weekly Nutrient Calculator at

64 Resources Smarter Lunchrooms Movement Web page

65 Questions questions to or phone at

66 Thank you!


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