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Week 9: Journalism 2001 November 9, 2009. Review of last week’s news Hard News: Hard News: (murders, city council, government, etc.) –Major local stories.

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Presentation on theme: "Week 9: Journalism 2001 November 9, 2009. Review of last week’s news Hard News: Hard News: (murders, city council, government, etc.) –Major local stories."— Presentation transcript:

1 Week 9: Journalism 2001 November 9, 2009

2 Review of last week’s news Hard News: Hard News: (murders, city council, government, etc.) –Major local stories –Major national/international stories –Major sports stories Soft News: Soft News: (retirements, school programs, human interest) –Local stories –National/international stories –Sports stories

3 Announcements Election coverage Election coverage –Anyone go to the TV stations? Letter to editor: Letter to editor: –10 points extra credit –Many different samples Kendra success on Athletics Web site Kendra success on Athletics Web site

4 Upcoming stories Hard News 2 Reporting Assignment Hard News 2 Reporting Assignment –Rewritten stories on class weblog:  Sports Reporting Assignment Sports Reporting Assignment –Final article due: THIS THURSDAY, November 12 –Any problems? Community Journalism reporting assignment Community Journalism reporting assignment –Story pitch due: November 4 –Final article due: November 24 Feature Story Assignment Feature Story Assignment –Story pitch due: November 18 –First draft due: November 30 –Final article due: December 14

5 Community Journalism Reporting Assignment Story Pitch Due: Wednesday, November 4 Story Pitch Due: Wednesday, November 4 –No more than three paragraphs, 200 words –Include 5Ws and H – to: Go out into an area of Duluth, report on a topic of interest in that area Go out into an area of Duluth, report on a topic of interest in that area –Divide the city into zones: Each reporter picks a neighborhood to cover  Canal Park: Sage, Kendra  Central Hillside/Observation Hill:  Chester Park/UMD: Carli, Clayton, Rita, Kyle  Congdon Park: Alyssa, Lauren  Downtown/Central Business District: Zach, Jon, Amelia, Christian  Duluth Heights: Dana  East Hillside/Endion: Abi  Fond du Lac/Gary New Duluth:  Kenwood: Ben  Lakeside/Lester Park: Molly  Lincoln Park/West End:  Morgan Park/Smithville/Riverside:  Park Point: Kelly, Sam  Piedmont Heights: Chris  West Duluth: Spirit Valley, Denfeld, Norton Park: Howie  Woodland: Justin, Aaron  Entire city: Scott Final story due: November 24 Final story due: November 24

6 Let’s look up neighborhoods on Google maps Make final neighborhood assignments Make final neighborhood assignments –Where to go for story ideas?

7 Community story ideas Fall 2008 Class Weblog: 8/ 8/ Spring 2008 Class Weblog: 2008/community_journalism/ 2008/community_journalism/ Fall 2007 Class Weblog: 7/community_journalism/ 7/community_journalism/

8 Let’s try an “idea map”

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10 Feature Story Reporting Assignment Story Pitch Due: November 18 Story Pitch Due: November 18 –No more than three paragraphs, 200 words –Include 5Ws and H – to: First draft due: November 30 First draft due: November 30 Final story due: December 14 Final story due: December 14

11 The world of features –News stories focus on timely, public events. –Features are more personal.  Include topics, treatments, styles not found in news. Personalizing the news with stories Features explore a variety of topics  Lifestyles  Health  Science and technology  Entertainment  Food  Homes and gardens

12 The world of features –Personality profile –Human-interest story –Color story –Backgrounder –Trend story Popular feature stories 10 –Reaction piece –Flashback –How-to –Consumer guide –Personal narrative

13 What are feature stories? Profile people who made the news Profile people who made the news Explain events that moved or shook the news Explain events that moved or shook the news Analyze what is happening in the world, nation or community Analyze what is happening in the world, nation or community Teach an audience how to do something Teach an audience how to do something Suggest better ways to live in a complicated world Suggest better ways to live in a complicated world Examine trends in constantly changing societies Examine trends in constantly changing societies Take people someplace or let them see something new Take people someplace or let them see something new Entertain or humor an audience Entertain or humor an audience

14 Generating story ideas “Hard” news, “soft” news –Relative terms that describe topic and treatment of story.  Expect serious, timely events to be written in inverted- pyramid style.  Items that are less urgent or somber make up “soft” news.

15 Generating story ideas Great stories are waiting discovery –Publication’s archives –Competitors –TV, magazines, newspapers, Web sites –News releases –Reader suggestions –Brainstorming

16 Generating story ideas Is it a good one? –Where did it come from? –Is it original? –Did it surprise you? –Does the idea have movement? –Is there a STORY there? –Is there tension? –Is it true? –Do you like the story?

17 Generating story ideas Turn your idea into a story –See if it’s been done. –Focus your angle. –Talk to your editor. –Do your research. –Plan the package. –Write the story.

18 Feature style Some stories require a livelier, looser, more literary voice –Tom Wolfe dubbed it “New Journalism.”  Realistic dialogue.  Vivid reconstruction of scenes.  Viewed through the eyes of the characters.  Recording everyday details.

19 Feature style Successful feature writers… –Helpful tips  Write tightly.  Vary sentence structure.  Match treatment to topic.  Don’t overdo.  Avoid 1 st person.  Stay objective.  Learn shorthand or use a tape recorder.  Remember editors have strong opinions.  Read.

20 Feature story structures Standard story structures –How long should this story be? –What key points do I need to make? –Think visually. –Think package.

21 Writing profiles Good profiles reveal feelings, attitudes, habits and mannerisms –How to research and write successful profiles  Solicit your subject’s support.  Interview and observe.  Find your focus.  Follow up with interviews and research.  Structure your story.

22 Writing profiles Sample story structures for profiles –Anecdotal lead  Engaging, revealing small story to lure readers in –Nut graf  Summarizes why this person matters now –Scene #1  Observe subject in action using dialog, details, descriptions –Chronology  Recap of subject’s past

23 Writing profiles Sample story structures… –Scene #2  Another look at the subject in action –What lies ahead  Plans, dreams, goals and obstacles –Closing quote

24 Types of feature stories Personality profiles Personality profiles –Bring audience closer to a person –Paint vivid picture of the person  Interviews, observations, creative writing –One of the most popular features –Buck Human interest story Human interest story –Show a subject’s oddity, or its practical, emotional or entertainment value –Travel writing

25 Trend stories Trend stories –Examines people, things or organizations that are having an impact on society In-depth stories In-depth stories –Detailed account beyond a basic news story or feature –Lengthy news feature –Investigative story Backgrounder/analysis piece Backgrounder/analysis piece –Adds meaning to current issues in the news by providing more explanation

26 Feature story examples Dartball a big hit Dartball a big hit Whitewater rafting on the St. Louis River Whitewater rafting on the St. Louis River Higher education in Duluth Superior Higher education in Duluth Superior UMD Alumni Story UMD Alumni Story Punk rockers Punk rockers Legislative food Legislative food Doll/train collectors Doll/train collectors Buck profile Buck profile Duluth News-Tribune Duluth News-Tribune –Article on timekeeper

27 Stories in “the morgue” Girl’s last gifts bring smiles to kids’ faces Girl’s last gifts bring smiles to kids’ faces Always, Ed Always, Ed The perfect kiss The perfect kiss All this ice, and the captain is hot All this ice, and the captain is hot The good doctor The good doctor

28 Ideas from last year Tall ships Tall ships Profile of Larry Antonich Profile of Larry Antonich Grassroots Farm Grassroots Farm Homelessness in Duluth Homelessness in Duluth Hockey player profile Hockey player profile Online gaming addiction Online gaming addiction

29 Let’s brainstorm some ideas! Texas Roadhouse construction Texas Roadhouse construction –Culvers –Buffalo Wild Wings Veterans returning to UMD Veterans returning to UMD Nontraditional students Nontraditional students Bentleyville Bentleyville Dining Center needs improvement/policy Dining Center needs improvement/policy Overcrowding in the Dining Center Overcrowding in the Dining Center 300-foot rental rule in Duluth 300-foot rental rule in Duluth On-campus alcohol policy – being in room On-campus alcohol policy – being in room Reconstruction of ice rink on campus Reconstruction of ice rink on campus Civil engineering program Civil engineering program H1N1 vaccine availability H1N1 vaccine availability Absentee from classes due to H1N1 Absentee from classes due to H1N1 Parking problems Parking problems Cheating – academic dishonesty policy Cheating – academic dishonesty policy

30 Organizing a feature story Choose the theme Choose the theme –Do research, organize story around theme –Each section – beginning, body, end – revolve around theme –Narrow your theme  Has the story been done before?  The audience  Holding power  Worthiness

31 Write the lead Write the lead –Usually avoid summary leads  Tough to summarize feature in opening paragraph –Lead possibilities endless:  Narrative, contract, staccato, direct address, etc. –Lead block: two or more paragraphs Write the body Write the body –Vital information while educating, entertaining and emotionally tying reader to the subject Provide background information Provide background information

32 Use a thread Use a thread –Can be single person, event or thing that highlights theme of the story Use transitions Use transitions –Transitions hold paragraphs together and helps writers move from one person or area to the next –Common transition words: meanwhile, therefore, sometimes, also, and, but, meantime, nevertheless, however

33 Use dialogue Use dialogue –Keeps readers attached to a story’s key players –Helps to introduce sources Use voice Use voice –Subjective expression of writer –Writer’s signature or personal style –More license to reveal opinions, personality Write the ending Write the ending –Can trail off, or end with a climax –Often ends where the lead started –End with a quote

34 Rewriting and collaboration First draft rarely makes it into print First draft rarely makes it into print Editor, reporter brainstorm ideas Editor, reporter brainstorm ideas Develop clear, narrow angle Develop clear, narrow angle Impact sources: Impact sources: –Real people who bring stories to life

35 Checklist for effective features Know how to write news Know how to write news Do your homework Do your homework Use observation Use observation Use a tape recorder Use a tape recorder Do not be afraid to ask questions Do not be afraid to ask questions Maintain a relationship with every source Maintain a relationship with every source Transcribe handwritten notes as soon as possible Transcribe handwritten notes as soon as possible

36 Write a rough outline first Write a rough outline first Do not overwrite Do not overwrite –Use lots of quotes! Polish the story Polish the story Take criticism from an editor Take criticism from an editor

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39 Out-of-Class Assignments Due today: Due today: –Dan Rather Assignment Due November 16: Due November 16: –Feature Story Pitch

40 Tonight’s assignment AP Editing Assignment AP Editing Assignment

41 Portfolio Store academic information on your Electronic Portfolio. Each student has 100 mb of storage. Store academic information on your Electronic Portfolio. Each student has 100 mb of storage. Access Electronic Portfolio at: https://portfolio.umn.edu/portfolio/index.j sp Access Electronic Portfolio at: https://portfolio.umn.edu/portfolio/index.j sp https://portfolio.umn.edu/portfolio/index.j sp https://portfolio.umn.edu/portfolio/index.j sp

42 Egradebook Doublecheck assignments correct in egradebook: Doublecheck assignments correct in egradebook: –http://www.d.umn.edu/egradebook Late Assignments: If you haven’t made arrangements to complete late assignments, you receive no points.


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