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AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 1 AbilityNet (Scotland) Welcome to this morning's session, hosted by Craig Mill from AbilityNet Scotland.

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Presentation on theme: "AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 1 AbilityNet (Scotland) Welcome to this morning's session, hosted by Craig Mill from AbilityNet Scotland."— Presentation transcript:

1 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 1 AbilityNet (Scotland) Welcome to this morning's session, hosted by Craig Mill from AbilityNet Scotland

2 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 2 AbilityNet …..is a national charity and the UK's leading provider of expertise on computing and disability. Who is talking to you today?

3 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 3 How AbilityNet works! 30% funded by fees 10 centres across the UK Over 2,000 assessments in 2001 Over 15,000 phone calls in 2001 Over 600 machines supplied

4 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 4 AbilityNet Services Helpline Tel: Assessment services Informative courses Consultancy – including website accessibility Website –

5 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 5 An essential technology! The Kettle

6 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 6 The AbilityNet Kettle Montage!

7 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 7 The AbilityNet Approach In every operation we have… a persona methodan end result

8 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 8 The AbilityNet Approach We believe that there are many different methods, and our approach is all about finding the right method, for a unique individual.

9 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 9 It doesn’t need to be expensive: Research in the USA showed that an average cost of adaptation was less than $150 on top of the cost of the computer. We run a hands-on course, called Low Cost – No Cost, which looks at equipment which costs no more than £100.

10 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 10 The AbilityNet Triangle Fewer, more seriously disabled, requiring complex, and sometimes expensive equipment. Line of identifiable disability. Large number of people who require ‘some help’, but you would not use the word disabled to help describe their difficulties.

11 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 11 Provision It is unrealistic for any organisation to attempt to cater for ALL of its users’ needs at any one time. Aims When carrying out library/accessibility audits we recommend that, if possible, organisations should aim to meet % of its clients/customers/users’ needs, e.g., physical, sensory, reading and writing.

12 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 12 Provision Our experience has shown us that whilst there will always be a number of individuals who will require personalised equipment in a supported environment, it is possible to provide for the majority of disabled people quite simply by understanding the alternatives, and having some of them available.

13 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 13 Internet The Internet should also be an accessible environment. Web sites should comply with the W3C guidelines. The ways in which the Internet is accessed (usability) should also be considered.

14 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 14 Alternative and Adaptive Technology Alternative Readily available choices that do the same job, but in a different way to the standard technology. Adaptive Modified specifically to accommodate disability.

15 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 15 Just one thing to remember! “At AbilityNet we have learned that almost any individual with a physical disability, sensory impairment or reading and writing difficulty, can use alternative and adaptive technology to help make positive steps towards greater independence, and achievements, with Information Communication Technology (ICT).”

16 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 16 The Standard keyboard

17 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 17 The disabled keyboard?

18 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 18 Alternative keyboards There are alternative keyboards which provide greater access compared to a traditional keyboard: integrated numeric pad designed for right and left handed people fits on to a wheelchair tray keyguard to rest hands and accurately position fingers

19 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 19 Alternative keyboards Keyboard overlay stickers for visually impaired users:

20 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 20 Alternative keyboards Keyboard for early learners or older users:

21 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 21 Adaptive keyboards For example, the WinKing adaptive keyboard: non QWERTY word endings clustered together integrated keyguard combined mouse actions

22 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 22 Adaptive keyboards Or the WinKing Mini adaptive keyboard: for small, fine motor movements word endings clustered together combined mouse actions

23 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 23 Adaptive keyboards IntelliKeys: membrane keyboard changeable overlays QWERTY and ABC layouts fine motor skills

24 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 24 Adaptive keyboards IntelliKeys:

25 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 25 Ergonomic Keyboards Fujitsu Siemens

26 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 26 Ergonomic Keyboards Goldtouch ergonomic:

27 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 27 Recap – Standard Keyboard Designed 130 years ago, to slow you down. Right handed people only. Less than 20% of people use the numeric pad, yet we all have one. Just too big to fit between the arms of a standard wheelchair. Designed for arms which come out of the chest, are 6 inches long, and all the fingers end at the same length.

28 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 28 The Standard Mouse

29 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 29 Alternative pointing devices precise and accurate mouse movements easy to use buttons for left and right click ‘drag lock’ function key natural contour rests for hands

30 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 30 Alternative pointing devices designed for both left and right handed users come in various sizes ergonomically shaped Contour mice:

31 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 31 Adaptive pointing devices joystick with various attachments integrated keyguard ‘drag lock’ function key various speeds

32 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 32 Recap – Standard Mouse Unnatural gripping motion required. Right handed people only. Even the slightest dexterity problems in the hands, make it difficult to use. Requires very accurate control of the hand, while looking at the screen.

33 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 33 Switch input systems Switches can provide a valuable and accessible way of using a computer.

34 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 34 Software: Accessibility Options Many modifications can be made using software that is standard in Windows: FilterKeys StickyKeys Increasing menu font sizes Changing background colours Adjusting speed and settings of mouse Magnification / colour contrast

35 AbilityNet – Making IT Accessible for All. 35 AbilityNet Says: Be Pro Active Promoting accessibility requires a co-ordinated effort bringing together staff experience and skills, with new technology along with regular updates on accessibility and technology. - download our factsheets for free.


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