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The State of the Art in Science Education: Results of MARCH study D-r Todor Galev and Diana Popova Forum Democrit, Bulgaria.

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Presentation on theme: "The State of the Art in Science Education: Results of MARCH study D-r Todor Galev and Diana Popova Forum Democrit, Bulgaria."— Presentation transcript:

1 The State of the Art in Science Education: Results of MARCH study D-r Todor Galev and Diana Popova Forum Democrit, Bulgaria

2  Online survey in 7 countries  2 groups: teachers and students in secondary education  Fieldwork: 15 May – 30 October 2014  Outcomes  Teachers’ results – weighted statistically to allow inter- group analyses  Students’ results – weighted statistically to allow cross- country comparisons  Weighted against the total number of students in each country  Semi-structured in-depth interviews  policy-makers and other stakeholders, engaged in promoting S&T in secondary education MARCH Study

3 Online Survey: distribution of responses StudentsTeachers

4  Schools’ institutionalized partnerships tend to remain in the field of science and still neglect the industry Teachers: STEM partnerships

5  The majority of the teachers have never used any financial instruments to support their STEM teaching Teachers: use of additional funding for improving STEM teaching * Base: 840 responses (multiple choice question)

6  Teachers: tend to cover equally the main aspects of the modern science controversies  Students: smaller share of students agree with teachers; still more than half of the students believe teachers do this Teachers & Students: balanced STEM

7  Teachers tend to assign to their students mainly tasks related with the theoretical side of the study process Teachers: STEM – from theory to practice

8 Teachers VS Students: from theory to practice  Bigger share of students assess themselves as having experience in both presenting STEM and caring out a scientific experiment than the assessment of the teachers  Students’ own assessment:  No significant differences across countries in terms of presenting STEM  “Hands-on” leaders - UK and PT (>70% of students have multiple experience in carrying out scientific experiments)  “Modest achievers” – BG, RS, EL

9  Online sources are preferred  Insignificant share of students across all the countries use specialized web-pages -> a room for development of STEM-related e-learning materials  Wikipedia is still a major information source irrespective of the limitations of some of its language versions  Family members are in general not engaged (partially except for LT) Students: internet - the ultimate source * Base: 1420 cases (multiple choice question)

10 Teachers VS Students: from theory to practice  Students’ self-assessment and teachers’ opinion persistently differ  Significant differences across the countries regarding the students’ practice in making scientific experiments:  “Hands-on” leaders: UK & PT, followed by DE, LT and RS  Countries to lag behind – BG & EL

11  Physics, chemistry and biology - main fields for the students’ experiments:  Significant differences among the countries in terms of fields of the students’ experiments Students: the missing “T” in S&T experiments

12 Teachers VS Students: use of ICT in teaching STEM  Teachers’ and students’ opinion defer regarding the use of ICT in teaching STEM

13 Teachers VS Students: use of ICT in teaching STEM (2)  Teachers’ and students’ opinion defer regarding the use of ICT in teaching STEM

14 Teachers VS Students: use of ICT in teaching STEM (3)  Teachers’ and students’ opinion defer regarding the use of ICT in teaching STEM

15  One of every four students only assesses the availability of ICT equipment as insufficient; no significant differences among the countries Use of ICT: students’ recap

16  Significant differences among the countries; the most problematic countries: BG, RS & LT Students: STEM equipment is not sufficient

17  50/50: students in DE, EL, RS and UK  More STEM is desired in BG (with RS - the countries where the overall level of S&T related teaching is on a lowest level) and in PT (a country with comparatively high level of S&T teaching) Students: Desire for STEM

18  Even in the countries with lower achievements in science education, students recognize STEM as a necessity Student: Why STEM?

19  Secondary education is still related more closely to science- based world than to business/industry, incl. in countries with decades-long tradition in S&T education;  Science education in all the countries is still much more theoretically-based than focused on “hands-on” practices;  Even in leading countries, the respective policies have not provided the expected results; Recap: main findings and challenges ahead

20  Need to involve family members in S&T promoting activities together with their kids:  In-depth interviews and the available studies show only single good practices; we need special focus in the public policies;  Back to the (offline) library! A particular attention is required in training students how to recognize “the real science” from the para-science, especially in the online world; Recap: main findings and challenges ahead

21 THANK YOU Questions?


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