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ILU Project Management Training

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Presentation on theme: "ILU Project Management Training"— Presentation transcript:

1 ILU Project Management Training
Project Management II Project Execution, Control and Closure

2 Agenda - Day One Introductions Planning & Initiation Phases Recap
Break Critical Path of a Project Critical Path Exercise Project Execution Process Lunch Project Controlling Process Issues Form Exercise Day One Wrap-up

3 Introductions Name Department Number of years at ILICO
Number of projects you have managed Average size of project you have managed Course expectations Ice breaker Introduce yourself and other instructor prior to asking class to introduce themselves By asking the number and size of projects the participants have managed, you get a good idea of the experience of the class. This will help you gauge the speed of going through the course material. Capture course expectations on on a flip chart. At the end of the 2 day class, as part of the wrap-up, refer back to captured expectations, review each expectation and ask class if that expectation was met. One instructor should write the expectations on a flip while the other polls the class for introduction information Ice breaker examples: most fun thing you have done the past year describe favorite vacation describe the person sitting to your left as an animal you most think matches that persons personality

4 Ground Rules Level Playing Field (titles left at the door)
One conversation at a time Respect opinions of others No beating a dead horse Come back from breaks ON TIME Have FUN

5 Course Objectives Refresh concepts learned in PM - I
Understand PMI Material... Critical Path Project Execution Phase How To Apply Project Control Risk & Response Project Closing Process How To Apply ILICO Forms & Processes to PMI Concepts Learn How to Manage Project

6 Recap - Course I Initiation & Planning

7 Recap - Definitions A Project is “A temporary endeavor undertaken to create a unique product or service.” Project Management is “the application of knowledge, skills tools and techniques to project activities in order to meet or exceed stakeholder needs and expectations from a project.” This involves balancing competing demands among: Scope, time, cost and quality Stakeholders with differing needs and expectations Identified requirements (needs) and unidentified requirements (expectations) Examples of projects: This class is a small project Class if offering a unique service and is a temporary endeavor - it lasts two day. This class is customized for ILICO and therefore distinguishes itself from other courses Homeowner project (remodel basement) Longer timeline, more involved still has all the characteristics of a project

8 Recap - Project Management Skills
Communication skills Facilitation skills Leadership skills Organizational skills Negotiating skills Project Management Technical skills Notice that 5 out of 6 project management characteristics are soft skills.

9 Stress the point that the first class covered the initiation and planning processes and that this class will focus on Controlling, Executing and Closing processes. Make sure everyone understands that the processes are all overlapping, which means that each process will be revisited in each phase of the project lifecycle.

10 Recap - 5 PMI PM Processes
Initiating Processes Planning Executing Controlling Closing Plan developed for execution Plan is executed and Controlled As the execution is controlled, it may require additional planning Plan is successfully executed Plan and execution has been controlled Feedback in both directions Project or phase is approved in order to proceed Stress the importance that the project management processes are “never ending” each process is initiated or reviewed during all phases of the project lifecycle

11 Recap - 9 PMI PM Knowledge Areas
Scope Management understanding what is to be accomplished, by who and when? Ensure everyone focused on the right activity at the right time Risk Management minimizing threats and weakness while optimizing opportunities and strengths Quality Management determining the quality policy of the project and then determining the practices to ensure project quality Human Resource Management determining the roles and responsibilities of the resources necessary to support the project as well as the skills and timing needs Communications Management determines what will be communicated, Frequency of communications and who will receive communications Again, most people think of “Scheduling” when you say project management. Project Management is a collection of bodies of Knowledge that include (those listed) Tell class that we are going to briefly cover all of the Bodies of Knowledge, but we are going to focus more on Scope and Time Management, over the next day

12 Recap - 9 PMI PM Knowledge Areas
Contract / Procurement Management determines how suppliers will be selected and the contract types that will be administered Time Management determines how long each activities takes to complete to ensure timely completion of the project Cost Management determines the costs of resources and materials to ensure that the project is completed within the approved budget Integration Management Each BOK is integrated with each other at differing degrees of application depending on where and when you are in the life cycle phase Again, most people think of “Scheduling” when you say project management. Project Management is a collection of bodies of Knowledge that include (those listed) Tell class that we are going to briefly cover all of the Bodies of Knowledge, but we are going to focus more on Scope and Time Management, over the next day

13 Recap - Triple Constraint
As project managers, we are always trying to manage the constraints of product, schedule, and budget Product … The “Triple Constraint” Stress the point that it is very easy for a project manager to isolate one specific constraint and manage it very easily, it becomes more difficult when all constraints have impacts and implications to others Schedule Budget

14 Recap - ILICo’s PM Processes
Indianapolis Life’s project initiation process involves: Drafting the very simple Project Initiation form Gaining the sponsorship of your manager or department head Gaining the support of the Prioritization Committee for projects over $250 k Gaining the approval to proceed on to the planning process

15 Recap Course Example Re-Roofing the House

16 Recap - Work Breakdown Structures
Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) - “A deliverable oriented ‘family tree’ which organizes, defines, and graphically displays the total work to be accomplished in order to achieve the ultimate deliverable of a project. Each descending level represents an increasingly detailed definition of the project deliverable.” (PMBOK) WBS SCHEMATIC 1.0 Reroof House 1.1 Materials Estimation 1.2 Materials Gathering 1.3 Roof Application Method to decompose deliverable into supporting subordinate sub-deliverables Typically NOUN oriented Decompose to the level most comfortable which also provides meaningful management information Introduce reroofing project. Level numbers show the hierarchy. Go through the example. 1.1.1 Measure Roof 1.1.2 Calculate Materials 1.2.1 Purchase Materials 1.2.2 Take Delivery 1.3.1 Roof Removal 1.3.2 Roof Application Remove Shingles Remove Nails Apply Shingles Cut Caps Apply Caps

17 Recap - Re-Roofing Project Activity List
1.1.1 Measure Roof 1.1.2 Calculate Materials 1.2.1 Purchase Materials 1.2.2 Take Delivery Remove Shingles Remove Nails Apply Shingles Cut Caps Apply Caps

18 Recap - Project Network Diagram
1.1.1 Measure Roof 1.1.2 Calculate Materials 1.2.1 Purchase Materials 1.2.2 Take Delivery Remove Shingles For the re-roofing project example: + You must measure the roof before you can calculate the materials (this is a finish to start dependency) + You much purchase the materials before you can take delivery of them + Because of the risk of rain or delay in delivery, we are choosing to make the removal of the old roof dependent on the delivery of the materials for the new roof + While you must start removing the shingles before you remove all the nail that are left, you don’t have to finish removing all the shingles before you start removing nails. You can start removing nails sometime after removing shingles has started. (this is a start to start dependency with a start lag time) + Similarly, you can start applying shingles after you have removed part of the roof, but you don’t have to wait until all of the shingles and nails have been removed (another start to start dependency with a start lag time) + You can begin cutting caps after you have started applying some of the shingles + You can begin applying caps after you have cut enough of them to apply. Apply Shingles Remove Nails Cut Caps Apply Caps

19 Recap - Project Duration Estimates
Estimated durations (in hours) have been estimated for each activity. The example shown is utilizing Microsoft Project to record the tasks (activities), and durations.

20 Recap - Project Schedule

21 Recap - GANTT Chart The following is a depiction of a project schedule. Developed using Microsoft Project 98, this project schedule shows the activities, dependencies, durations and resources planned to accomplish the project objectives. This view is called a GAANT chart.

22

23 Critical Path

24 Determine Critical Path of Project Plan
Critical Path - “The series of activities that determines the duration of a project. In a deterministic model, the critical path is usually defined as those activities with float less than or equal to a specified value, often zero. It is the longest path through the project. ” (PMBOK) Our roofing example has a fairly self evident critical path. Certainly you need to remove the old shingles and nails before applying the new ones. You certainly can remove the nails in parallel. More complex projects will have offer more sequencing options and calculating and understanding the critical path at this detail will help you sort out your options. Emphasize that the critical path can be affected by the way the activities can be sequenced and by the actual duration. For example, if you are able to shorten a duration by adding resources you can possibly change the critical path.

25 Determining Critical Path - Key Terms
Early Start (ES) - “...the earliest possible point in time on which the uncompleted portions of an activity (or project) can start, based on the network logic and any schedule constraints. Early start dates can change as the project progresses and changes are made to the project plan.” (PMBOK) Early Finish (EF) - “...the earliest possible point in time on which the uncompleted portions of an activity (or project) can finish, based on the network logic and any schedule constraints. Early finish dates can change as the project progresses and changes are made to the project plan.” (PMBOK) Introduce the grahic on the bottom as an element of the exercise we will be completing. As the class is gaining an understanding of these key terms, explain that most projects are managed to an early start and early finish instead of late start and late finish. Early start and Early finish scheduling will allow tasks to start as soon as possible and finish as soon as possible. There are some projects that manage to late start and late finish, but this is more risky because if late starts or finishes are missed, the whole project is usually delayed.

26 Determining Critical Path - Key Terms
Late Start (LS) - “...the latest possible point in time that an activity may begin without delaying a specified milestone (usually the project finish date).” (PMBOK) Late Finish (LF) - “...the latest possible point in time that an activity may be completed without delaying a specified milestone (usually the project finish date).” (PMBOK) Total Float (TF) - “The amount of time that an activity may be delayed from its early start without delaying the project finish date. Float is a mathematical calculation, and can change as the project progresses and changes are made to the project plan. Also called slack, total float, and path float.” (PMBOK) Same as previous page

27 ES-EF/LS-LF Calculations
ES = Previous ES + Previous duration EF = ES + task duration - 1 LF = previous LF - previous task duration (working backwards through the NLD) LS = LF - task duration +1 Total Float (TF) = ES - LS Critical Path = path where TF = 0 Spend some time explaining each formula and point out that they are repeated on their exercise materials. Our goal in using these formulas is finding the tasks with total float of zero. These tasks are clearly identified as critical path tasks. Why do we need to know the critical path tasks? Once you identify them you can better manage the project as time goes on and respond to constantly changing demands.

28 Roofing Example Walk the students through this example.
Explain that you need to start at the end and find the final Late Finish (LF). We do a “forward pass” through the NLD to determine early start and early finish, we do a “backward pass” to determine late start and late finish dates. By doing a forward and backward pass, we determine the Total Float for each task and then we can determine the critical path. The critical path for an NLD is usually the path that has a total float of zero for each task.

29 Class Exercise - Determine Critical Path
You have 20 minutes to complete the diagram We will take 10 minutes to discuss your answers Take aways Understand critical path and total float

30 Baseline Project plan Not etched in stone Living document
Baseline Project Plan - “The original approved plan (for a project, a work package, or an activity), plus or minus approved scope changes. Usually used with a modifier (e.g., cost baseline, schedule baseline, performance measurement baseline). ” (PMBOK) Not etched in stone Living document Understand purpose of what MS project is showing you Different types of baseline (schedule, cost) A baseline project plan is used as a measurement tool to determine project performance. The baseline can change during the plan execution, but those changes are reflected to continue to monitor and report project status.

31 S Curve Example The S Curve shown is simply an example of how real projects play out compared with the original plan. A sound process includes connection with the baseline plan to assure cost and schedule management.

32

33 Executing Processes Execution = What Control = How
Closure = How do you know you are done

34 Project Plan Execution - Description
The primary process for carrying out the project plan. In this process, the project manager and the project management team must coordinate and direct the various technical and organizational interfaces that exist in the project. Inputs Tools & Techniques Outputs 1. Project plan 2. Supporting detail 3. Organizational policies 4. Corrective action 1. General management skills 2. Product skills and knowledge 3. Work authorization system 4. Status review meeting 5. Project management information system 6. Org. procedures 1. Work results 2. Change requests Tools & Techniques: General management skills - such as leadership, communicating, and negotiating are essential. Product skills and knowledge - access to an appropriate set of skills and knowledge about the project product. Work authorization system - a formal procedure for sanctioning project work to ensure that work is done at the right time and in the proper sequence. The primary mechanism is typically a written authorization to begin work on a specific activity or work package. On many smaller projects, verbal authorization will be adequate. Status review meetings - regularly scheduled meetings held to exchange information about the project. Project management information system - tools and techniques used to gather, integrate, and disseminate the outputs of the other project management processes. It is used to support all aspects of the project from initiating through closing and generally includes both manual and automated systems. Outputs: Work results - the outcomes of the activities performed to accomplish the project. Information on work results - which deliverables have been completed and which have not, to what extent quality standards are being met, what costs have been incurred or committed, etc - is collected as part of the project plan execution and fed into the performance reporting process. Change requests - are often identified while the work of the project is being done.

35 Project Plan Execution - Tools & Techniques
General management skills - such as leadership, communicating, and negotiating are essential. Product skills and knowledge - access to an appropriate set of skills and knowledge about the project product. Work authorization system - a formal procedure for sanctioning project work to ensure that work is done at the right time and in the proper sequence. The primary mechanism is typically a written authorization to begin work on a specific activity or work package. On many smaller projects, verbal authorization will be adequate.

36 Project Plan Execution - Tools & Techniques
Status review meetings - regularly scheduled meetings held to exchange information about the project. Project management information system - tools and techniques used to gather, integrate, and disseminate the outputs of the other project management processes. It is used to support all aspects of the project from initiating through closing and generally includes both manual and automated systems.

37 Project Plan Execution - Outputs
Work results - the outcomes of the activities performed to accomplish the project. Information on work results - which deliverables have been completed and which have not, to what extent quality standards are being met, what costs have been incurred or committed, etc - is collected as part of the project plan execution and fed into the performance reporting process. Change requests - are often identified while the work of the project is being done.

38 Scope Verification - Description
The process of formalizing acceptance of the project scope and work results by the stakeholders. It is primarily concerned with acceptance of work results while quality control is primarily concerned with the correctness of the work results. Inputs Tools & Techniques Outputs 1. Work results 2. Product documentation 1. Inspection 1. Formal acceptance Tools & Techniques: Inspection - includes activities such as measuring, examining, and testing undertaken to determine whether results conform to requirements. Inspections are variously called reviews, product reviews, audits, and walk-throughs. Outputs: Formal acceptance - Documentation that the client or sponsor has accepted the product of the project or phase must be prepared and distributed. Such acceptance may be conditional, especially at the end of a phase.

39 Scope Verification - Tools & Techniques
Inspection - includes activities such as measuring, examining, and testing undertaken to determine whether results conform to requirements. Inspections are variously called reviews, product reviews, audits, and walk-throughs.

40 Scope Verification - Outputs
Formal acceptance - Documentation that the client or sponsor has accepted the product of the project or phase must be prepared and distributed. Such acceptance may be conditional, especially at the end of a phase.

41 Delivery Acceptance Form

42 Quality Assurance - Description
All the planned and systematic activities implemented within the quality system to provide confidence that the project will satisfy the relevant quality standards. Inputs Tools & Techniques Outputs 1. Quality management plan 2. Results of quality control measurements 3. Operational definitions 1. Quality planning tools and techniques 2. Quality audits 1. Quality improvement Tools & Techniques: Quality planning tools & techniques - include tools such as: benefit/cost analysis, benchmarking, flowcharting and design of experiments. Quality audits - a structured review of other quality management activities. The objective is to identify lessons learned that can improve performance of this project. Outputs: Quality Improvement - includes taking action to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of the project to provide added benefits to the project stakeholders.

43 Quality Assurance - Tools & Techniques
Quality planning tools & techniques - include tools such as: benefit/cost analysis, benchmarking, flowcharting and design of experiments. Quality audits - a structured review of other quality management activities. The objective is to identify lessons learned that can improve performance of this project.

44 Quality Assurance - Outputs
Quality Improvement - includes taking action to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of the project to provide added benefits to the project stakeholders. There are many different theories of how quality is either designed in the plan, or it is inspected. We are not going to get into a lot of quality assurance discussions, but it should be pointed that there are many different theories on quality management.

45 Team Development - Description
Includes both enhancing the ability of stakeholders to contribute as individuals as well as enhancing the ability of the team to function as a team. Individual development is the foundation necessary to develop the team, and is critical to the project. Inputs Tools & Techniques Outputs 1. Project staff 2. Project plan 3. Staffing management plan 4. Performance reports 5. External feedback 1. Team-building activities 2. General management skills 3. Reward & recognition systems 4. Collocation 5. Training 1. Performance improvements 2. Input to performance appraisals Tools & Techniques: Team-building activities - management and individual actions taken specifically and primarily to improve team performance. Many actions, such as involving non-management level team members in the planning process, or establishing ground rules for surfacing and dealing with conflict, may enhance team performance as a secondary effect. Team-building activities can vary from a five minute agenda item in a regular status review meeting to an extended, off-site, professionally facilitated experience designed to improve interpersonal relationships among key stakeholders General management skills Reward and recognition systems - formal management actions which promote or reinforce desired behavior. To be effective, such systems must make the link between performance and reward clear, explicit, and achievable. Projects must often have their own reward and recognition systems since the systems of the performing organization may not be appropriate. Reward and recognition systems much also consider cultural differences. Collocation - involves placing all, or almost all, of the most active project team members in the same physical location to enhance their ability to perform as a team. Training - all activities designed to enhance the skills, knowledge and capabilities of the project team. Outputs: Performance improvements - the primary output of team development. Input to performance appraisals - project staff should generally provide input to the performance appraisals of any project staff members that they interact with in a significant way.

46 Team Development - Tools & Techniques
Team-building activities - management and individual actions taken specifically and primarily to improve team performance. Many actions, such as involving non-management level team members in the planning process, or establishing ground rules for surfacing and dealing with conflict, may enhance team performance as a secondary effect. Team-building activities can vary from a five minute agenda item in a regular status review meeting to an extended, off-site, professionally facilitated experience designed to improve interpersonal relationships among key stakeholders.

47 Team Development - Tools & Techniques
General management skills Reward and recognition systems - formal management actions which promote or reinforce desired behavior. To be effective, such systems must make the link between performance and reward clear, explicit, and achievable. Projects must often have their own reward and recognition systems since the systems of the performing organization may not be appropriate. Reward and recognition systems much also consider cultural differences.

48 Team Development - Tools & Techniques
Collocation - involves placing all, or almost all, of the most active project team members in the same physical location to enhance their ability to perform as a team. Training - all activities designed to enhance the skills, knowledge and capabilities of the project team.

49 Team Development - Outputs
Performance improvements - the primary output of team development. Input to performance appraisals - project staff should generally provide input to the performance appraisals of any project staff members that they interact with in a significant way.

50 Information Distribution - Description
Involves making needed information available to project stakeholders in a timely manner. It includes implementing the communications management plan as well as responding to unexpected requests for information. Inputs Tools & Techniques Outputs 1. Work results 2. Communications management plan 3. Project plan 1. Communications skills 2. Information retrieval systems 3. Information distribution systems 1. Project records Tools & Techniques: Communications skills - used to exchange information. The sender is responsible for making the information clear, unambiguous, and complete so the receiver can receive it correctly and for confirming that it is properly understood. Includes: Written and oral, listening and speaking Internal (within the project) and external (the customer, media, public..) Formal (reports, briefings…) and informal (memos, ad hoc …) Vertical (up and down the organization) and horizontal (with peers) Information retrieval systems - Information can be shared by team members through a variety of methods including manual filing systems, electronic text databases, project management software, and systems which allow access to technical documentation. Information distribution systems - using a variety of methods including project meetings, hard copy document distribution, shared access to networked electronic databases, fax, electronic mail, voice mail and video conferencing. Outputs: Project records - may include correspondence, memos, reports and documents describing the project. This information should, to the extent possible and appropriate, be maintained in an organized fashion. Project team members may often maintain personal records in a project notebook.

51 Information Distribution - Tools & Techniques
Communications skills - used to exchange information. The sender is responsible for making the information clear, unambiguous, and complete so the receiver can receive it correctly and for confirming that it is properly understood. Includes: Written and oral, listening and speaking Internal (within the project) and external (the customer, media, public..) Formal (reports, briefings…) and informal (memos, ad hoc …) Vertical (up and down the organization) and horizontal (with peers)

52 Information Distribution - Tools & Techniques
Information retrieval systems - Information can be shared by team members through a variety of methods including manual filing systems, electronic text databases, project management software, and systems which allow access to technical documentation. Information distribution systems - using a variety of methods including project meetings, hard copy document distribution, shared access to networked electronic databases, fax, electronic mail, voice mail and video conferencing.

53 Information Distribution - Outputs
Project records - may include correspondence, memos, reports and documents describing the project. This information should, to the extent possible and appropriate, be maintained in an organized fashion. Project team members may often maintain personal records in a project notebook.

54 Solicitation - Description
Involves obtaining information (bids and proposals) from prospective sellers on how project needs can be met. Inputs Tools & Techniques Outputs 1. Procurement documents 2. Qualified seller lists 1. Bidders conferences 2. Advertising 1. Proposals Tools & Techniques: Bidder conferences - are meetings with prospective sellers prior to preparation of a proposal. They are used to ensure that all prospective sellers have a clear, common understanding of the procurement (technical requirements, contract requirements, etc.). Advertising - Existing lists of potential sellers can often be expanded by placing advertisements in general circulation publications. Outputs: Proposals - are seller-prepared documents that describe the seller’s ability and willingness to provide the requested product.

55 Solicitation - Tools & Techniques
Bidder conferences - are meetings with prospective sellers prior to preparation of a proposal. They are used to ensure that all prospective sellers have a clear, common understanding of the procurement (technical requirements, contract requirements, etc.). Advertising - Existing lists of potential sellers can often be expanded by placing advertisements in general circulation publications.

56 Solicitation - Outputs
Proposals - are seller-prepared documents that describe the seller’s ability and willingness to provide the requested product.

57 Source Selection - Description
Involves the receipt of bids and the application of the evaluation criteria to select a provider. The process is not straightforward: Price may be the primary determinant for an off-the-shelf item, but the lowest proposed price may not be the lowest cost if the seller proves unable to deliver. Proposals are often separated into technical (approach) and commercial (price). Inputs Tools & Techniques Outputs 1. Proposals 2. Evaluation criteria 3. Organizational policies 1. Contract negotiation 2. Weighting system 3. Screening system 4. Independent estimates 1. Contract Tools & Techniques: Contract negotiation - involves clarification and mutual agreement on the structure and requirements of the contract prior to the signing of the contract. To the extent possible, final contract language should reflect all agreements reached. Weighting system - a method for quantifying qualitative data in order to minimize the effect of personal prejudice on source selection. Screening system - establishing minimum requirements of performance for one or more of the evaluation criteria. Independent estimates - the procuring organization may prepare its own estimates as a check on proposed pricing. Outputs: Contract - a contract is a mutually binding agreement which obligates the seller to provide the specified product and obligates the buyer to pay for it. A contract is a legal relationship subject to remedy in the courts. Although all project documents are subject to some form of review and approval, the legally binding nature of a contract usually means that it will be subjected to a more extensive approval process.

58 Source Selection - Tools & Techniques
Contract negotiation - involves clarification and mutual agreement on the structure and requirements of the contract prior to the signing of the contract. To the extent possible, final contract language should reflect all agreements reached. Weighting system - a method for quantifying qualitative data in order to minimize the effect of personal prejudice on source selection. Screening system - establishing minimum requirements of performance for one or more of the evaluation criteria. Independent estimates - the procuring organization may prepare its own estimates as a check on proposed pricing.

59 Source Selection - Outputs
Contract - a contract is a mutually binding agreement which obligates the seller to provide the specified product and obligates the buyer to pay for it. A contract is a legal relationship subject to remedy in the courts. Although all project documents are subject to some form of review and approval, the legally binding nature of a contract usually means that it will be subjected to a more extensive approval process.

60 Contract Administration - Description
The process of ensuring that the seller’s performance meets contractual requirements. On larger projects with multiple product and service providers, a key aspect of contract administration is managing the interfaces among providers. Inputs Tools & Techniques Outputs 1. Contract 2. Work results 3. Change requests 4. Seller invoices 1. Contract change control system 2. Performance reporting 3. Payment system 1. Correspondence 2. Contract changes 3. Payment requests Tools & Techniques: Contract change control system - defines the process by which the contract may be modified. It includes the paperwork, tracking systems, dispute resolution procedures and approval levels necessary for authorizing changes. Performance reporting - provides management with information about how effectively the seller is achieving the contractual objectives. Payment system - Usually handled by accounts payable. Outputs: Correspondence - Contract terms and conditions often require written documentation of certain aspects of buyer/seller communications, such as warnings of unsatisfactory performance and contract changes or clarifications. Contract Changes - changes (approved and unapproved) are fed back through the appropriate project planning and project procurement processes, and the project plan or other relevant documentation is updated as appropriate. Payment requests - sent to accounts payable.

61 Contract Administration - Tools & Techniques
Contract change control system - defines the process by which the contract may be modified. It includes the paperwork, tracking systems, dispute resolution procedures and approval levels necessary for authorizing changes. Performance reporting - provides management with information about how effectively the seller is achieving the contractual objectives. Payment system - Usually handled by accounts payable.

62 Contract Administration - Outputs
Correspondence - Contract terms and conditions often require written documentation of certain aspects of buyer/seller communications, such as warnings of unsatisfactory performance and contract changes or clarifications. Contract Changes - changes (approved and unapproved) are fed back through the appropriate project planning and project procurement processes, and the project plan or other relevant documentation is updated as appropriate. Payment requests - sent to accounts payable.

63

64 Day One Wrap Up Wrap Up +/ Chart

65 Agenda - Day Two Change Control & Exercise Break
Schedule, Cost, Quality Control, & Exercise Lunch Risk Response Control Exercise: Risk Response ILICO Status Report Exercise: Project Status Tracking Meeting Role Play Closing Process Full Project Life-Cycle Exercise Course Wrap-up

66 Controlling Processes
Execution = What Control = How Closure = How do you know you are done

67 Performance Reporting - Definition
Involves collecting and disseminating performance information in order to provide stakeholders with information about how resources are being used to achieve project objectives. This includes Status Reporting, Progress Reporting & Forecasting. Inputs Tools & Techniques Outputs 1. Project plan 2. Work results 3. Other project records 1. Performance reviews 2. Variance analysis 3. Trend analysis 4. Earned value analysis 5. Information distribution tools and techniques 1. Performance reports 2. Change requests Tools & Techniques: Performance reviews - meetings held to assess project status or progress. Variance analysis - comparing actual project results to planned or expected results. Cost and schedule variances are the most frequently analyzed, but variances from plan in the areas of scope, quality and risk are often of equal or greater importance. Trend analysis - examining project results over time to determine if performance is improving or deteriorating. Earned value analysis - The most commonly used method of performance measurement. It integrates scope, cost and schedule measures to help the project management team assess project performance. Information distribution tools & techniques Outputs: Performance reports - organize and summarize the information gathered and present the result of any analysis. Reports should provide the kinds of information and the level of detail required by various stakeholders as documented in the communications management plan. Change requests - analysis of project performance often generates a request for a change to some aspect of the project. These change request are handled as described in the various change control processes.

68 Performance Reporting - Includes
Performance reporting should generally provide information on scope, schedule, cost and quality. Many projects also require information on risk and procurement. Reports may be prepared comprehensively or on an exception basis.

69 Performance Reporting - Tools & Techniques
Performance reviews - meetings held to assess project status or progress. Variance analysis - comparing actual project results to planned or expected results. Cost and schedule variances are the most frequently analyzed, but variances from plan in the areas of scope, quality and risk are often of equal or greater importance. Trend analysis - examining project results over time to determine if performance is improving or deteriorating.

70 Performance Reporting - Tools & Techniques
Earned value analysis - The most commonly used method of performance measurement. It integrates scope, cost and schedule measures to help the project management team assess project performance. Information distribution tools & techniques

71 Performance Reporting - Outputs
Performance reports - organize and summarize the information gathered and present the result of any analysis. Reports should provide the kinds of information and the level of detail required by various stakeholders as documented in the communications management plan. Change requests - analysis of project performance often generates a request for a change to some aspect of the project. These change request are handled as described in the various change control processes.

72 ILICO Project Status Report

73 Class Role Play - Status Meeting
Hand out question sheet to a student and have them ask you the questions. Your answers in the good and bad example will demonstrate your points. Bad Status Meeting Role Play: Class facilitators show how not to run a project status meeting. No agenda Doesn’t know status of project Stakeholder concerns Status of issues How are you addressing a resource quitting (PM doesn’t even know employee quit) Ask class why it went wrong Good Status Meeting Role Play: Class facilitators show how to run a project status meeting Give agenda, know status of project, stakeholder concerns, status of issues, how are you addressing a resource quitting Ask class why it went well

74 Issues Management - Definition
Involves recording, organizing and prioritizing project issues that affect cost or schedule and maintaining a current status on each issue through its resolution. Inputs Tools & Techniques Outputs 1. Project plan 2. Project Issues 3. Decision & Approval authority structure 1. Issue logging system 2. Status meetings 3. Issue routing & approval matrix 4. Issue resolution procedures 1. Up-to-date issue log 2. Resolved issues Tools & Techniques: Issues Logging System - Can be an MS Word table or a powerful database. The key is to assign ownership and follow-up on aging and links to tasks Status Meetings - Issues and issue status should be a part of routine status discussions Issue Approval & Routing Matrix - The team should be clearly aware of which stakeholders and project team members need to provide input and approval Issue Resolution Procedures - These procedures should clearly document how the logging system, status meetings and approval process work together Outputs: Up-to-date Issue Log - issues can lead to scope changes or risk responses. An up-to-date issues log provides for effective communication, documentation and progress management Resolved Issues - timeliness in resolving project issues will keep the project on track and help contain time delays and cost increases

75 Issues Management - Tools & Techniques
Issues Logging System - Can be an MS Word table or a powerful database. The key is to assign ownership and follow-up on aging and links to tasks. Status Meetings - Issues and issue status should be a part of routine status discussions. Issue Approval & Routing Matrix - The team should be clearly aware of which stakeholders and project team members need to provide input and approval. Issue Resolution Procedures - These procedures should clearly document how the logging system, status meetings and approval process work together.

76 Issues Management - Outputs
Up-to-date Issue Log - issues can lead to scope changes or risk responses. An up-to-date issues log provides for effective communication, documentation and progress management. Resolved Issues - timeliness in resolving project issues will keep the project on track and help contain time delays and cost increases.

77 Issues Management - ILICO Issues Form

78 Class Exercise - Issues Management
You have 15 minutes to use the ILICO issue template to document two issues related to your project We will take 10 minutes to discuss your answers Take aways Understand critical path and total float

79 Overall Change Control - Definition
Concerned with influencing the factors which create changes to ensure that changes are beneficial; determining that a change has occurred; and managing the actual changes as they occur Inputs Tools & Techniques Outputs 1. Project plan 2. Performance reports 3. Change requests 1. Change control system 2. Configuration mgmt 3. Performance measurement 4. Additional planning 5. Project management information system 1. Project plan updates 2. Corrective action 3. Lessons learned Tools & Techniques: Configuration management - is any documented procedure used to apply technical and administrative direction and surveillance to: Identify and document the functional and physical characteristics of an item or system. Control any changes to such characteristics Record and report the change and its implementation status Audit the items and system to verify conformation to requirements A subset of the change control system used to ensure that the description of the project product is correct & complete. Performance measurement - such as earned value help to assess whether variances from the plan require corrective action. Additional planning - Projects seldom run exactly according to plan. Prospective changes may require new or revised cost estimates, modified activity sequences, analysis of risk response alternatives, or other adjustments to the project plan. Project management information system Outputs: Project plan updates - any modification to the contents of the project plan or the supporting detail. Appropriate stakeholders must be notified as needed. Corrective action - anything done to bring expected future project performance into line with the project plan. Lessons learned - the causes of variances, the reasoning behind the corrective action chosen, and other types of lessons learned should be documented so that they become part of the historical database for both this project and other projects of the performing organization

80 Overall Change Control - Requires
Maintaining the integrity of the performance measurement baselines All approved changes should be reflected in the project plan, but only project scope changes will affect the performance measurement baselines. Ensuring that changes are reflected in the definition of the project scope. Coordinating changes across knowledge areas. For example, a proposed schedule change will often affect cost, risk, quality and staffing.

81 Overall Change Control - Tools & Techniques
Configuration management - is any documented procedure used to apply technical and administrative direction and surveillance to: Identify and document the functional and physical characteristics of an item or system. Control any changes to such characteristics Record and report the change and its implementation status Audit the items and system to verify conformation to requirements A subset of the change control system used to ensure that the description of the project product is correct & complete.

82 Overall Change Control - Tools & Techniques
Performance measurement - such as earned value help to assess whether variances from the plan require corrective action. Additional planning - Projects seldom run exactly according to plan. Prospective changes may require new or revised cost estimates, modified activity sequences, analysis of risk response alternatives, or other adjustments to the project plan. Project management information system

83 Overall Change Control - Outputs
Project plan updates - any modification to the contents of the project plan or the supporting detail. Appropriate stakeholders must be notified as needed. Corrective action - anything done to bring expected future project performance into line with the project plan. Lessons learned - the causes of variances, the reasoning behind the corrective action chosen, and other types of lessons learned should be documented so that they become part of the historical database for both this project and other projects of the performing organization.

84 Scope Change Control - Definition
Concerned with: Influencing the factors that create scope changes to ensure changes are beneficial Determining that a scope change has occurred Managing the actual changes when and if they occur Inputs Tools & Techniques Outputs 1. Work breakdown structure 2. Performance reports 3. Change requests 4. Scope management plan 1. Scope change control system 2. Performance measurement 3. Additional planning 1. Scope changes 2. Corrective action 3. Lessons learned Tools & Techniques: Scope change control system - defines the procedures by which the project scope may be changed. It includes the paperwork, tracking systems, and approval levels necessary for authorizing changes. Performance measurement - help to assess the magnitude of any variations which do occur. An important part of scope change control is to determine what is causing the variance and to decide if the variance requires corrective action. Additional planning - scope changes may require modifications to the WBS or analysis of alternatives Outputs: Scope changes - any modification to the agreed upon project scope as defined by the approved WBS. Scope changes often require adjustments to cost, time, quality or other project objectives. Corrective action - anything done to bring expected future project performance into line with the project plan. Lessons learned - The causes of variances, the reasoning behind the corrective action chosen, and other types of lessons learned from scope change control should be documented.

85 Scope Change Control - Tools & Techniques
Scope change control system - defines the procedures by which the project scope may be changed. It includes the paperwork, tracking systems, and approval levels necessary for authorizing changes. Performance measurement - help to assess the magnitude of any variations which do occur. An important part of scope change control is to determine what is causing the variance and to decide if the variance requires corrective action. Additional planning - scope changes may require modifications to the WBS or analysis of alternatives.

86 Scope Change Control - Outputs
Scope changes - any modification to the agreed upon project scope as defined by the approved WBS. Scope changes often require adjustments to cost, time, quality or other project objectives. Corrective action - anything done to bring expected future project performance into line with the project plan. Lessons learned - The causes of variances, the reasoning behind the corrective action chosen, and other types of lessons learned from scope change control should be documented.

87 ILICO Scope Change Form

88 Class Exercise - Scope Change
Each team will have 15 minutes to document two scope changes as it relates to there project using the ILICO scope change template We will take 5 minutes to discuss your answers Hi-light critical path analysis and affect on other concurrent project tasks.d

89 Schedule Control - Definition
Concerned with: Influencing the factors that create schedule changes to ensure they are beneficial Determining that the schedule has changed Managing the actual changes when and as they occur Inputs Tools & Techniques Outputs 1. Project schedule 2. Performance reports 3. Change requests 4. Schedule management plan 1. Schedule change control system 2. Performance measurement 3. Additional planning 4. Project management software 1. Schedule updates 2. Corrective action 3. Lessons learned Tools & Techniques: Schedule change control system - defines the procedures by which the project schedule may be changed. It includes the paperwork, tracking systems, and approval levels necessary for authorizing changes. Performance measurement - help to assess the magnitude of any variations which do occur. An important part of schedule change control is to decide if the schedule variation requires corrective action. Additional planning - scope changes may require new or revised activity duration estimates, modified activity sequences, or analysis of alternative schedules. Project management software - MS Project Crashing - “Taking action to decrease the total project duration after analyzing a number of alternatives to determine how to get the maximum duration compression for the least cost” (PMBOK). Fast-Tracking - “Compressing the project schedule by overlapping activities that would normally be done in sequence, such as design and construction.” (PMBOK) Outputs: Schedule updates - any modification to the schedule information which is used to manage the project. Appropriate stakeholders must be notified as needed. Corrective action - anything done to bring expected future schedule performance into line with the plan. Lessons learned - The causes of variances, the reasoning behind the corrective action chosen, and other types of lessons learned from schedule control should be documented.

90 Schedule Control - Tools & Techniques
Schedule change control system - defines the procedures by which the project schedule may be changed. It includes the paperwork, tracking systems, and approval levels necessary for authorizing changes. Performance measurement - help to assess the magnitude of any variations which do occur. An important part of schedule change control is to decide if the schedule variation requires corrective action. Additional planning - scope changes may require new or revised activity duration estimates, modified activity sequences, or analysis of alternative schedules.

91 Schedule Control - Tools & Techniques
Project management software - MS Project Crashing - “Taking action to decrease the total project duration after analyzing a number of alternatives to determine how to get the maximum duration compression for the least cost” (PMBOK). Fast-Tracking - “Compressing the project schedule by overlapping activities that would normally be done in sequence, such as design and construction.” (PMBOK) “Crashing” and “Fast-Tracking” are techniques used by project managers to maximize the execution of a project for schedule purposes only. We need to stress that sometimes using these methods, the costs of doing this work is usually increased.

92 Schedule Control - Outputs
Schedule updates - any modification to the schedule information which is used to manage the project. Appropriate stakeholders must be notified as needed. Corrective action - anything done to bring expected future schedule performance into line with the plan. Lessons learned - The causes of variances, the reasoning behind the corrective action chosen, and other types of lessons learned from schedule control should be documented.

93 Re-roofing Schedule Change Example
Using old roofing NLD, change duration parameters of a task Recalculate float and critical path

94 Class Exercise - Schedule Change
Each team will have 15 minutes to evaluate two task duration changes. Recalculate the ES-EF/LF-SL and total float parameters We will take 10 minutes to discuss your answers Hi-light critical path analysis and affect on other concurrent project tasks.d

95 Cost Control - Definition
Concerned with: Influencing the factors that create changes to ensure changes are beneficial Determining that the cost baseline has changed Managing the actual changes when and if they occur Inputs Tools & Techniques Outputs 1. Cost baseline 2. Performance reports 3. Change requests 4. Cost management plan 1. Cost change control system 2. Performance measurement 3. Additional planning 4. Computerized tools 1. Revised cost estimates 2. Budget updates 3. Corrective action 4. Estimate at completion 5. Lessons learned Tools & Techniques: Cost change control system Defines the procedures by which the cost baseline may be changed Includes the paperwork, tracking systems, and approval levels necessary for authorizing changes. Performance measurement Helps to assess the magnitude of any variations Determine root cause and to decide if corrective action is required Additional planning Scope changes may require revised cost estimates or analysis of alternatives. Computerized tools PM software Spreadsheets Outputs: Revised cost estimates - modifications to the cost information used to manage the project. Appropriate stakeholders must be notified as needed. Budget updates - changes to an approved cost baseline. Generally revised only in response to scope changes. Corrective action - anything done to bring expected future project performance into line with the project plan. Estimate at completion - forecast of total project costs. Lessons learned - The causes of variances, the reasoning behind the corrective action chosen, and other types of lessons learned from cost control should be documented.

96 Cost Control - Definition
Includes: Monitoring cost performance to detect variances from plan Ensuring that all appropriate changes are recorded accurately in the cost baseline Preventing incorrect, inappropriate, or unauthorized changes from being included in the cost baseline Informing appropriate stakeholders of authorized changes Cost control searches out the “whys” of both positive and negative variances.

97 Cost Control - Tools & Techniques
Cost change control system Defines the procedures by which the cost baseline may be changed Includes the paperwork, tracking systems, and approval levels necessary for authorizing changes. Performance measurement Helps to assess the magnitude of any variations Determine root cause and to decide if corrective action is required Additional planning Scope changes may require revised cost estimates or analysis of alternatives. Computerized tools PM software Spreadsheets

98 Cost Control - Outputs Revised cost estimates - modifications to the cost information used to manage the project. Appropriate stakeholders must be notified as needed. Budget updates - changes to an approved cost baseline. Generally revised only in response to scope changes. Corrective action - anything done to bring expected future project performance into line with the project plan. Estimate at completion - forecast of total project costs. Lessons learned - The causes of variances, the reasoning behind the corrective action chosen, and other types of lessons learned from cost control should be documented.

99 ILICo Cost Management Worksheet
The ILICo Cost Management Worksheet is used for larger projects that have their own cost center For smaller projects the Project Manager must manage and report on costs, but may have to pull the information from specific cost center reports

100 Re-roofing Cost Control Example
Using the re-roofing project as a basis, show an example of the project budget. Materials Labor Insurance? - Supplemental for friends falling off the roof? Scope and schedule changes usually also have an effect on project cost

101 Project Quality Control

102 Project Quality Recap Quality Planning - Identifying which quality standards are relevant to the project, and determining how to satisfy them. Quality Assurance - The process of evaluating overall project performance on a regular basis to provide confidence that the project will satisfy the relevant standards. Quality Control - The process of monitoring specific project results to determine if they comply with relevant quality standards and identifying ways to eliminate causes of unsatisfactory performance.

103 ILICo Project Quality ILICo does not have universal project quality standards or advanced tools and templates We have successfully used test plans for software projects as the basis for quality control Successful project teams will identify relevant standards and test for quality in the deliverables of the project and experience only small amounts of re-work resulting from quality problems

104 Quality Control - Definition
Monitoring specific project results to determine if they comply with relevant quality standards and identifying ways to eliminate causes of unsatisfactory results. Inputs Tools & Techniques Outputs 1. Work results 2. Quality management plan 3. Operational definitions 4. Checklists 1. Inspection 2. Control charts 3. Pareto diagrams 4. Statistical sampling 5. Flowcharting 6. Trend analysis 1. Quality improvement 2. Acceptance decisions 3. Rework 4. Completed checklists 5. Process adjustments Tools & Techniques: Inspections - activities such as measuring, examining, and testing undertaken to determine whether results conform to requirements. Control charts - a graphic display of the results, over time, of a process. They are used to determine if the process is “in control”. Pareto diagrams - a histogram, ordered by frequency of occurrence, that shows how many results were generated by type or category of identified cause. Statistical sampling - involves choosing part of a population of interest for inspection. Appropriate sampling can often reduce the cost of quality control. Flowcharting - Used in quality control to help analyze how problems occur. Trend analysis - using mathematical techniques to forecast future outcomes based on historical results. Trend analysis is often used to monitor: Technical performance - how many errors or defects have been identified, how many remain uncorrected Cost and schedule performance - how many activities per period were completed with significant variances Outputs: Quality improvement - action to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of the project to provide added benefit to the project stakeholders. Acceptance decisions - either accepted or rejected Rework - action taken to bring a defective or non-conforming item into compliance with requirements or specifications. Rework, especially unanticipated rework, is a frequent cause of project overruns. Completed checklists - part of the project’s records Process adjustments - involve immediate corrective or preventative action as a result of quality control.

105 Quality Control - Definition
The project management team should have a working knowledge of statistical quality control, especially sampling and probability, to help them evaluate quality control outputs. Among other subjects, they should know the differences between: Prevention (keeping errors out of the process) and inspection (keeping errors out of the hands of the customer) Attribute sampling (the result conforms or it does not) and variables sampling (the result is rated on a continuous scale that measures degree of conformity) Special causes (unusual events) and random causes (normal process variation) Tolerances (the result is acceptable if it falls within the range specified by the tolerance) and control limits (the process is in control if the result falls within the control limits)

106 Quality Control - Tools & Techniques
Inspections - activities such as measuring, examining, and testing undertaken to determine whether results conform to requirements. Control charts - a graphic display of the results, over time, of a process. They are used to determine if the process is “in control”. Pareto diagrams - a histogram, ordered by frequency of occurrence, that shows how many results were generated by type or category of identified cause.

107 Quality Control - Tools & Techniques
Statistical sampling - involves choosing part of a population of interest for inspection. Appropriate sampling can often reduce the cost of quality control. Flowcharting - Used in quality control to help analyze how problems occur. Trend analysis - using mathematical techniques to forecast future outcomes based on historical results. Trend analysis is often used to monitor: Technical performance - how many errors or defects have been identified, how many remain uncorrected Cost and schedule performance - how many activities per period were completed with significant variances

108 Quality Control - Outputs
Quality improvement - action to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of the project to provide added benefit to the project stakeholders. Acceptance decisions - either accepted or rejected Rework - action taken to bring a defective or non-conforming item into compliance with requirements or specifications. Rework, especially unanticipated rework, is a frequent cause of project overruns. Completed checklists - part of the project’s records Process adjustments - involve immediate corrective or preventative action as a result of quality control.

109 Risk Response Control - Definition
Involves executing the risk management plan in order to respond to risk events over the course of the project. When changes occur, the basic cycle of identify, quantify, and respond is repeated. Inputs Tools & Techniques Outputs 1. Risk management plan 2. Actual risk events 3. Additional risk identification 1. Workarounds 2. Additional risk response development 1. Corrective action 2. Updates to risk management plan Tools & Techniques: Workarounds - unplanned responses to negative risk events. Workarounds are unplanned only in the sense that the response was not defined in advance of the risk occurring. Additional risk response development - If the risk event was not anticipated, or the effect is greater than expected, the planned response may not be adequate, and it will be necessary to repeat the response development process and perhaps the risk quantification process as well. Outputs: Corrective action - consists primarily of performing the planned risk response. Updates to the risk management plan - as anticipated risk events occur or fail to occur, and as actual risk event effects are evaluated, estimates of probabilities and value, as well as other aspects of the risk management plan should be updated.

110 Risk Response Control - Tools & Techniques
Workarounds - unplanned responses to negative risk events. Workarounds are unplanned only in the sense that the response was not defined in advance of the risk occurring. Additional risk response development - If the risk event was not anticipated, or the effect is greater than expected, the planned response may not be adequate, and it will be necessary to repeat the response development process and perhaps the risk quantification process as well.

111 Risk Response Control - Outputs
Corrective action - consists primarily of performing the planned risk response. Updates to the risk management plan - as anticipated risk events occur or fail to occur, and as actual risk event effects are evaluated, estimates of probabilities and value, as well as other aspects of the risk management plan should be updated.

112 Re-roofing Risk Response Example
The risk response metrics is a useful tool in identifying risks and assessing the impact to a project. When risks are assessed, there is some objectivity involved in determining the likelyhood and consequence. We try to get as much information as we can to make the appropriate judgment of each risk.

113 Class Exercise - Risk Response
You have 20 minutes to evaluate a series of risks associated to your project Complete the risk-response matrix We will take 10 minutes to discuss your answers Hi-light critical path analysis and affect on other concurrent project tasks.d

114 Status Report Form

115 Class Exercise - Project Status Report
You have 60 minutes to write a status report for your project including the issues, scope change, and risk-response matrices Each team should also conduct a project status tracking meeting according to ILICo standard agenda

116 Closing Processes Execution = What Control = How
Closure = How do you know you are done

117 Administrative Closure - Definition
Consists of verifying and documenting project results to formalize acceptance of the product of the project by the sponsor, client, or customer. It includes collection of project records, ensuring that they reflect final specifications. Inputs Tools & Techniques Outputs 1. Performance measurement documentation 2. Documentation of the product of the project 3. Other project records 1. Performance reporting tools and techniques 2. Work release plan 3. Interviews with Project Stakeholders 1. Project archives 2. Formal acceptance 3. Lessons learned Tools & Techniques: Uses Performance reporting tools & techniques Performance reviews Variance analysis Trend analysis Earned value analysis Work release plan Exit interviews with Project Stakeholders Outputs: Project archives - a complete set of indexed project records should be prepared for archiving by the appropriate parties. Formal acceptance - Documentation that the client or sponsor has accepted the product of the project (or phase) should be prepared and distributed. Lessons learned - the causes of variances, the reasoning behind the corrective action chosen, and other types of lessons learned should be documented so that they become part of the historical database for both this project and other projects of the performing organization.

118 Administrative Closure - Tools & Techniques
Uses Performance reporting tools & techniques Performance reviews Variance analysis Trend analysis Earned value analysis Work release plan Exit interviews with Project Stakeholders

119 Administrative Closure - Outputs
Project archives - a complete set of indexed project records should be prepared for archiving by the appropriate parties. Formal acceptance - Documentation that the client or sponsor has accepted the product of the project (or phase) should be prepared and distributed. Lessons learned - the causes of variances, the reasoning behind the corrective action chosen, and other types of lessons learned should be documented so that they become part of the historical database for both this project and other projects of the performing organization.

120 Class Exercise - Full Project Life Cycle
Each team has 90 minutes to plan a dinner party using the package provided We will take 30 minutes for feedback from each team and wrap-up the course Hi-light critical path analysis and affect on other concurrent project tasks.d

121 Day Two & Course Wrap Up Wrap Up +/ Chart


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