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Ancient India By Joey Jen & Patrick. Ancient India social structure and daily life Gods and Goddesses Priests and Scholars The Rajas and Their Noblemen.

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Presentation on theme: "Ancient India By Joey Jen & Patrick. Ancient India social structure and daily life Gods and Goddesses Priests and Scholars The Rajas and Their Noblemen."— Presentation transcript:

1 Ancient India By Joey Jen & Patrick

2 Ancient India social structure and daily life Gods and Goddesses Priests and Scholars The Rajas and Their Noblemen Merchants, Farmers, Land owners, and Craftsmen Servants, Workers, Wage earners

3 Gods and Goddesses TThe gods didn't really have a part in community life. Priests and Scholars TThey and they were the ones who made the offerings to the gods. The Rajas and Their Noblemen TThe Rajas were the people who ruled the city and would give the Priests gifts so that they would teach them the Vedas.  The Noblemen were the people who were sent by the Rajas to guard the city. Merchants, Farmers, Land owners, and Craftsmen TThese were the people who supplied the people with food clothing and other goods. Servants, Workers, Wage earners TThese were the people that served and did the jobs that nobody else wanted to. These classes were called varnas.

4 Social level at home Men were the head of the house. The children would be treated very unfairly. They had no say in what happened to them or anyone in the family, and they could be treated any way by their parents, especially their father. The girls were unwanted, and the boys were treated better, and with more respect. Others would pray at a temple that their friends and relatives would have boys.

5 Daily life in The Gupta Empire It was the time of peace and prosperity which led to greatest achievements in the every walk of life. They had religious freedom. Criminals were never put to death. Instead, they were fined for their crimes. Rewards of money were given to writers, artists, and scholars to encourage them to produce wonderful work, and they did. People were paid by the state for welfare projects like building of roads and other public works. Food was vegetarian and non- vegetarian but influence of Jainism and Buddhism saw people eating more vegetables, fruits, cereals, breads, and drink milk. People used to play chess, polo and cards. Martial arts including fencing, wrestling was very popular among people. They went for hunting as well.

6 Buddhism is a dharmic, non-theistic religion, a philosophy, and a life- enhancing system of psychology. Buddha was born in Lumbini (now in Nepal), and that he died aged around 80 in Kushinagara (India). Eventually, Indian Buddhism became virtually extinct, except in parts of Nepal Southern Buddhism, or Theravada, or Pali Buddhism - practiced mainly in Sri Lanka, Burma, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia and parts of Malaysia, Vietnam, China and Bangladesh (Southeast Asia) Eastern Buddhism, or East Asian Buddhism, or Chinese Buddhism, or Sino-Japanese Buddhism - practiced predominantly in China, Vietnam, Korea, Japan, Singapore and parts of Russia Northern Buddhism, or Tibetan Buddhism, or Tibeto- Mongolian Buddhism - practiced mainly in Tibet, Mongolia, Bhutan and parts of Nepal, India, China and Russia.

7 The Four Noble Truths/ The Noble Eightfold Path The Four Noble Truths The Buddha taught that in life there exists in the following places sorrow / suffering which is caused by desire and it can be cured (ceased) by following the Noble Eightfold Path. This teaching is called the Catvāry Āryasatyāni, the "Four Noble Truths". Suffering: Birth is suffering, aging is suffering, illness is suffering, death is suffering; union with what is displeasing is suffering; separation from what is pleasing is suffering; not to get what one wants is suffering; in brief, the five aggregates subject to clinging are suffering. The cause of suffering: The desire which leads to renewed existence (rebirth) (the cycle of samsara) The cessation of suffering: The cessation of desire. The way leading to the cessation of suffering: The Noble Eightfold Path The Noble Eightfold Path is the way to the cessation of suffering, the fourth part of the Four Noble Truths. This is divided into three sections : Sila (which concerns the physical bodily actions), Samadhi (which concerns the 'Conscious' mind) and Panna (which concerns the 'Unconscious' mind).

8 Architecture: Mughal architecture used by Persians as well as Islamic Mughal architecture began in 1526 during Mughal dynasty under the rule of emperor Babur during this time that the Taj Mahal was constructed (1648) in Agra, India and Shalimar Gardens characteristics of Mughal architecture: -perfect radial or bilateral symmetry -marble used for surface -garden surrounding the building or temple -indentures and carvings on the outer surface of marble stone Historical Significance: many mosques and Islamic and Persian structures built using Mughal architecture descriptive carvings leave behind detailed history of what life was like in ancient India during the 16th century under Mughal reign


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