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Buddhism: Dhyana = Zen. Questions --Write down the Japanese terms you find in the reading, and be ready to explain their meaning. --At first sight, this.

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Presentation on theme: "Buddhism: Dhyana = Zen. Questions --Write down the Japanese terms you find in the reading, and be ready to explain their meaning. --At first sight, this."— Presentation transcript:

1 Buddhism: Dhyana = Zen

2 Questions --Write down the Japanese terms you find in the reading, and be ready to explain their meaning. --At first sight, this text might not sound "religious" in a Christian or Islamic sense. How would you define its "religious" characteristics? What is "religious" about it? --Relate the reading to some of the ideas that have been already discussed in class. --What is the role and function of the Master? Why is he/she necessary for the progress of the student? --How would you define the relationship between "art" and "nature" in flower arrangement? In what ways is this art distinct from Western and Middle-Eastern artistic practices?

3 THE FOUR NOBLE TRUTHS of BUDDHISM The Nature of Suffering (Dukkha): "Now this... is the noble truth of suffering: birth is suffering, aging is suffering, illness is suffering, death is suffering; union with what is displeasing is suffering; separation from what is pleasing is suffering; not to get what one wants is suffering; in brief, the five aggregates subject to clinging are suffering." Suffering's Origin (Samudaya): "Now this... is the noble truth of the origin of suffering: it is this craving which leads to renewed existence, accompanied by delight and lust, seeking delight here and there, that is, craving for sensual pleasures, craving for existence, craving for extermination." Suffering's Cessation (Nirodha): "Now this... is the noble truth of the cessation of suffering: it is the remainderless fading away and cessation of that same craving, the giving up and relinquishing of it, freedom from it, nonreliance on it." The Way (Marga) Leading to the Cessation of Suffering: "Now this... is the noble truth of the way leading to the cessation of suffering: it is the Noble Eightfold Path; that is, right view, right intention, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, right concentration."Dukkhabirthagingdeathfive aggregates clingingcravingrenewed existencesensual pleasuresexistenceNoble Eightfold Pathright effortmindfulness concentration

4 The Sermon of the Flower Toward the end of his life, the Buddha took his disciples to a quiet pond for instruction. As they had done so many times before, the Buddha’s followers sat in a small circle around him, and waited for the teaching. But this time the Buddha had no words. He reached into the muck and pulled up a lotus flower. And he held it silently before them, its roots dripping mud and water. The disciples were greatly confused. Buddha quietly displayed the lotus to each of them. In turn, the disciples did their best to expound upon the meaning of the flower: what it symbolized, and how it fit into the body of Buddha’s teaching. When at last the Buddha came to his follower Mahakasyapa, the disciple suddenly understood. He smiled and began to laugh. Buddha handed the lotus to Mahakasyapa and began to speak. “What can be said I have said to you,” smiled the Buddha, “and what cannot be said, I have given to Mahakashyapa.” Mahakashyapa became Buddha’s successor from that day forward.

5 Scripture: Matthew 6:24-34 (Luke 12:24-27) 24 "No one can serve two masters; for either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve God and mammon. 25 "Therefore I tell you, do not be anxious about your life, what you shall eat or what you shall drink, nor about your body, what you shall put on. Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothing? 26 Look at the birds of the air: they neither sow nor reap nor gather into barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not of more value than they? 27 And which of you by being anxious can add one cubit to his span of life? 28 And why are you anxious about clothing? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow; they neither toil nor spin; 29 yet I tell you, even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these. 30 But if God so clothes the grass of the field, which today is alive and tomorrow is thrown into the oven, will he not much more clothe you, O men of little faith? 31 Therefore do not be anxious, saying, `What shall we eat?' or `What shall we drink?' or `What shall we wear?' 32 For the Gentiles seek all these things; and your heavenly Father knows that you need them all. 33 But seek first his kingdom and his righteousness, and all these things shall be yours as well. 34 "Therefore do not be anxious about tomorrow, for tomorrow will be anxious for itself. Let the day's own trouble be sufficient for the day.

6 Basho’s Haiku When I look carefully I see the nazuna blooming By the hedge.

7 Eugen and Gustie Herrigel

8 Prepared Questions --Write down the Japanese terms you find in the reading, and be ready to explain their meaning. --At first sight, this text might not sound "religious" in a Christian or Islamic sense. How would you define its "religious" characteristics? What is "religious" about it? --Relate the reading to some of the ideas that have been already discussed in class. --What is the role and function of the Master? Why is he/she necessary for the progress of the student? --How would you define the relationship between "art" and "nature" in flower arrangement? In what ways is this art distinct from Western and Middle-Eastern artistic practices?

9 Art for art’s sake? The problem about writing on Zen flower arrangement? What is the “heart” ? “Heart to heart”? Explain the principle of Three. “The zero of one’s being” ? The role of the small and the unassuming.

10 Chinese Character for King “Wang”

11 7-8 “Much depends on your being able to feel how the branch accomodates itself most willingly, thus entering into a relationship of inner tension with it. (…) Only when you have done everything correctly will the branch, quite effortlessly and without subsequent correction, acquire its form, as if it had grown like that by itself.”

12 The Keys Sayings of the Master “You should seek the outward form from inside” What are the implications of this saying for religion and for the arts in general?

13 Ikebana

14 Summary of Important Passages Pp. 71-73 “Of the ten virtues…exceptional phenomenon.” Pp. 81-84 “Japan is known…bright-green leaves.” Pp.88-90 “It is just the complete…beyond itself.” Pp.106-109 The Tea Ceremony. Pp. 117-118 “When one studies…from the world.” Pp.122-124 Stages of Knowledge


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