Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Picture books- The Maker Model AN ACTION RESEARCH PROJECT.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Picture books- The Maker Model AN ACTION RESEARCH PROJECT."— Presentation transcript:

1 Picture books- The Maker Model AN ACTION RESEARCH PROJECT

2 I would like to acknowledge the following teachers Wendy Wong, Jade Colusso, Meg Neal, Lauren Rutter and Margaret Steed

3 Action research Planning a change  Acting and observing the process and consequences of the change  Reflecting on these processes & consequences and then replanning  Acting and observing  Reflecting

4 The process  Data collection- students and teachers prior knowledge  Collaboration of partners  Creation of an overview - conceptual framework  Visual literacy- creativity concept  Use of The Maker model components  Product development

5 The Maker Model  Content modifications- Abstraction, complexity, variety, study of people, methods of enquiry  Process modifications- higher order thinking skills, open-ended processing, discovery and freedom of choice  Product modifications- Real world problems, real audiences and transformations

6 Step 1- Content modifications  Abstraction Going beyond the facts, examining underlying ideas, symbolism and meanings of the content.  Complexity Posing challenging questions or situations that force the learner to deal with content intricacies; greater breadth or depth.  Variety Sampling different types of related content, often from other disciplines or subject areas. Exposure to new ideas or content.  Study of People Relating content to people, the human situation and human problems.  Methods of Inquiry Relating content to the methods and procedures used by people in a field or subject area.  Process Modifications  Higher-order thinking skills Utilising higher-level thinking skills (analysis, synthesis and evaluation) for regular content processing.  Open-ended processing Utilising divergent thinking skills (such as paradox, analogy, tolerance for ambiguity, intuitive expression) for regular content processing.  Discovery Requiring students to progress through a series of steps of inquiry to draw own conclusions, answers and generalisations.  Freedom of choice Providing opportunities for self-directed, independent study.  Product Modifications  Real world problems Learners investigate the kinds of questions and problems investigated by professionals; ‘real-life’ problems.  Real audiences Student products are developed for the expected evaluation by professionals or experts in that field or discipline.  Transformations Students are encouraged to suggest practical uses for what

7 Concept- Creativity in Visual Literacy  A concept is a significant or ‘big’ idea that relates to other significant ideas. It helps to create meaning and provides an avenue for the study of English as a subject. Concepts connect the content for learners in order to create meaning.  Teaching through concepts means that we are starting with the ‘ big picture ’ bringing in complexity and abstraction.

8 Concept- Creativity  How do authors create meaning through words and pictures?

9  Step 2-Process Modifications  Higher-order thinking skills Utilising higher-level thinking skills (analysis, synthesis and evaluation) for regular content processing.  Open-ended processing Utilising divergent thinking skills (such as paradox, analogy, tolerance for ambiguity, intuitive expression) for regular content processing.  Discovery Requiring students to progress through a series of steps of inquiry to draw their own conclusions, answers and generalisations.  Freedom of choice Providing opportunities for self-directed, independent study.

10 Process  Collaborative planning and creation of units of work  Pog by Lynne lee  Piggybook by Anthony Browne  The True Story of The Three Little Pigs by John Scieszka  Oh the Place You Will Go Dr Suess  6/8 weeks used to teach Visual literacy skills and analysis of texts

11 Questioning model used in programming  Three types of questions model  Taxonomy based  Who/ What/ When/ Where? Cognitive questions set the scene for thinking  Why? How? Convergent question more than one answer  What if….Divergent question not one right answer  Pretend…. Divergent question not one right answer gives the opportunity for many options of answers  Which is best/ better? Evaluative questions can be used as a tool for evaluative criteria

12 Create, Analyse, Synthesis and Evaluate  Big ideas advance curriculum and rigour  Employ tasks that demand higher order thinking skills and problem solving  Providing feedback on performance  Using assessment tasks that are advanced  Working from high order activities and scaffolding down. Start with an analysing or synthesising task and scaffold into lower order skills for learners who need it.

13

14

15 CategoryExercises Knowledge: Recall data or information Read the story to the students. Focus on the attributes of the characters. Discuss the pictures introduce similes and what they do. Create character webs for the main characters. Complete a story sequence.( Worksheet) Answer comprehension questions, here, hidden and head questions.(Worksheet) Comprehension: Understand the meaning, translation, interpolation, and interpretation of instructions and problems. State a problem in one's own words. Write a diary entry about one thing you have been afraid of in your life. (Worksheet) Create a conversation between Vandal and Pog after they find Tom and Pog realises that children are just as scared of monsters as monsters are of children. (Worksheet) Application: Use a concept in a new situation or unprompted use of an abstraction. Applies what was learned in the classroom into novel situations in the work place. Create a new monster to add to the story. Write a description of the character. Sketch the character using Kim Gamble’s illustration style. Analysis: Separates material or concepts into component parts so that its organizational structure may be understood. Distinguishes between facts and inferences. Look at the illustration where Tom goes back to his parents. See how Pog’s world and the human world blend and overlap. This is the climax of the story, where reality and the world of imagination become one. (Compare this with the climax of Sendak’s Where the Wild Things Are, when Max returns home to his own bedroom.) What does this illustration say? Has Tom dreamed Pog, or has Pog dreamed Tom? Which scene is reality? Compare the two sides of the illustration, both the linking elements and the contrasts. Use a venn diagram to show the comparisons. Synthesis: Builds a structure or pattern from diverse elements. Put parts together to form a whole, with emphasis on creating a new meaning or structure. Use the character information to write your own introduction to a narrative. (Writing task sheet)

16 Evaluation: Make judgments about the value of ideas or materials. After writing Pog, one of the first things Lyn learned was that the author of a picture book must leave room for the illustrator; so among the first pieces of text to be jettisoned were some interesting but superfluous descriptions. Just for interest, here is the first paragraph of the original draft: Pog’s home was a hole underground. It was very roomy, dark and gloomy, full of cobwebs and fat spiders and bats hanging in untidy rows. There were moans and groans as the wind whistled through the tunnels and sometimes yellow eyes peered out of corners. It was perfect. Pog lived with his mother who was as busy as a dung beetle, and his dad … Evaluate how Kim Gamble illustrations provided the descriptions. Find three examples in the book and explain what techniques he used to do this.(Worksheet)

17 Step 3- Product modifications  Real world problems Learners investigate the kinds of questions and problems investigated by professionals; ‘real-life’ problems.  Real audiences Student products are developed for the expected evaluation by professionals or experts in that field or discipline.  Transformations Students are encouraged to suggest practical uses for what has been learned. Uses may be in non-traditional media.

18 Product  Assessment  Children will construct a picture book using the elements of a narrative structure and applying elements of design to create meaning through words and pictures  Self assessment task  Peer assessment task  Group work assessment  Children’s book product rubric  Individual assessment writing task pre-assessment task and post- assessment task

19 Product guidelines  Students work in groups of 2 or 3 to plan, write, edit and illustrate an original picture book. In order to provide some initial guidance it was stated that books must include an Australian animal.  Students were provided with clear structure and guidance throughout the planning, writing and editing phases of the process.  Students then moved into making meaningful illustrative decisions based on key visual concepts taught during the unit of visual literacy study.  Students were provided with the marking guidelines rubrics

20 Creation of the Product..  Backwards mapping with teacher planning  The last three weeks of the term were used to create the product  Children were given autonomy over who they worked with  There was a move from teacher led, to students taking responsibility for creative directions of their project

21 Plot pitch template- use the information in the boxes as a guide for organizing the text for your story 1 Introduce characters. Establish the setting. 2 Introduce the main conflict. 3 Actions taken to deal with the main conflict. Resulting complications. 4 Actions taken to deal with the main conflict. Resulting complications. 5 Actions taken to deal with the main conflict. Resulting complications. 6 Climax Presentation of the correct action for solving the conflict. 7. Examination of the main character’s feelings. 8. Resolution (“Tuck in” the main character.)

22 Self-Assessment Questions  Use these questions to assess your group’s plot pitch. Then make any changes you need to.  Does the main character have one or more identifiable traits that appeal to children?  Is the conflict something that a child will understand?  Does the main character attempt at least three different actions to try to solve the conflict?  Is the conflict resolved through the main character’s determination?  Overall, does the plot have “turnability” potential? Will the reader be drawn in by the plot and want to turn each page to find out what happens next?  Will the reader care about what happens to the main character?  Where are the more exciting places?  Where are the places that need more “zip” added to them?

23 Introduce Characters. 1 page Establish the Setting. Introduce the main conflict. 2 pages Actions taken to deal with the conflict. Resulting complications. 2 pages Actions taken to deal with the conflict. Resulting complications. 2 pages Actions taken to deal with the conflict. Resulting complications. 2 pages Climax. Presentation of the correct actions for solving the conflict. 2 pages Examination of the main character’s feelings. 2 pages Resolution. (“Tuck in” the main character.) 1 page

24

25 Peer Assessment Read through the story text of another group and write answers and comments below. Remember to be CONSTRUCTIVE in your feedback! What 2 key traits would YOU say the main character displays in the story ? What do YOU think the main conflict is in the story ? What actions does the character attempt in trying to solve the conflict ? Overall, is the text written in a way that draws you in and makes you want to keep reading ? Why? Where are the more exciting places? Where are the places that need more “zip” added to them? Other comments or feedback you feel should be included:

26 Sophisticated Competent Limited Understanding Teamwork The team worked well together to achieve objectives. Each member contributed in a valuable way to the product. All group members displayed high level of mutual respect and collaboration. The team worked well together most of the time, with only a few occurrences of communication breakdown or failure to collaborate when appropriate. Members were mostly respectful toward each other. Team did not collaborate or communicate well. Some members would work independently, without regard to objectives or priorities. A lack of respect and regard was frequently noted. Contribution All students contributed to the project by productively using their skills and abilities The team utilised the skills and abilities of each group member most of the time The skills and abilities of team members was largely disregarded and some members of the group did not value the contributions of others Creativity Creative ideas were valued by the team and used to correctly target the intended audience. Some imaginative ideas were produced by the group that would engage the target audience Ideas failed to capture the target audience Effort consistent effort by all group members was observed by the teacher and students All or most of the group members worked at allotted tasks most of the time Tasks were not always allocated to specific group members and were not completed in the allocated time frame Product Team successfully collaborated to create a well written engaging book Team mostly collaborated to produce an engaging story Team failed to meet their responsibility to create an engaging story using a set criteria and a set time frame. Grading Rubric for a Group Product

27

28 Features12345 Audience the writer’s capacity to orient, engage and affect the reader Contains some simple written content Shows awareness of basic audience through use of simple narrative markers( Long, long ago… simple title and descriptions) Internally consistent story that attempts to support the reader by developing a shared understanding of context( reader follows story easily) Supports reader understanding attempts to engage the reader(devices may include genre, control of writer reader relationship) Caters to the anticipated values and expectations of the reader(precise and sustained choice of language and use of narrative devices- evoke emotional responses, reveal values and attitudes etc) Ideas the creation, selection and crafting of ideas Ideas are very few and simple ideas may be unrelated Ideas are predictable not elaborated Ideas show some development of elaboration - ideas relate to a central storyline -Ideas are substantial and elaborated -Ideas effectively contribute to a central storyline -Story contains an underlying theme -Ideas are generated, selected and crafted to explore a theme - Ideas are skilfully used in the service of the storyline( mature viewpoints, good vs evil, heroic quests overcoming the odds..) Rubric for Children’s Picture Book

29 Text structure the organisation of narrative features including orientation, complication and resolution Minimal evidence of narrative structure -A recount of events without any tightening tension Contains a sizzling start and a complication -story has a problem but does not have any tension or excitement Contains a sizzling start and complication and an exciting ending Contains sizzling start, builds tension in the text it may have more than one complication or it may be layered. Coherent controlled complete narrative, effective plot devices(may have a twist/coda, flashbacks, reflection cliff- hanger etc) Character and setting The portrayal and development of character Setting the development of a sense of place, time and atmosphere through illustrations and plot Only names the setting and characters Characterization emerges through descriptions, actions thoughts and feelings And or setting emerges through description Effective characterisation. Details are selected to create distinct characters. AND/OR maintains a sense of setting throughout. Details are selected to create a sense of place and atmosphere. Illustrations and storyline mesh together to support each other.

30 Illustrationssimple Use of salience, colour to create mood Use of complex visual devices, vectors, gaze, form Vocabulary the range and precision of language choice Few content words Mostly simple verbs, adverbs adjectives or nouns Precise words or word groups( hissed, clutched… Use of the senses to build meaning and mood Language choice suits the genre (use of metaphors, similes etc) Cohesion control of multiple threads and relationships in the text Small selection of simple connectives eg; then, soon, but Meaning is clear text flows other connectives used eg. Meanwhile, instead, usually, Range of cohesive devices is used correctly shows continuity of ideas and tightly linked story. Spelling and grammarPunctuation or grammar errors font and text interferes with the layout No punctuation or grammatical errors some disruption of text layout to communication of ideas No punctuation or grammatical errors font and legibility do not disrupt the communication of ideas to the reader.

31

32 Resources  https://www.dropbox.com/sh/o1ze853so3gf4g9/AADR ODCMhmZ9NcKcTPEADcAga?dl=0 https://www.dropbox.com/sh/o1ze853so3gf4g9/AADR ODCMhmZ9NcKcTPEADcAga?dl=0


Download ppt "Picture books- The Maker Model AN ACTION RESEARCH PROJECT."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google