Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Directional, Identification, and Orientation Signage in Eight Southern New Jersey Public Libraries A Presentation by Rachel Simmons.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Directional, Identification, and Orientation Signage in Eight Southern New Jersey Public Libraries A Presentation by Rachel Simmons."— Presentation transcript:

1 Directional, Identification, and Orientation Signage in Eight Southern New Jersey Public Libraries A Presentation by Rachel Simmons

2 Statement of the Problem Public library patrons do not find what they need by themselves. Better signage in public libraries can help reduce this problem.

3 Purpose of the Study To discover if eight Southern New Jersey public libraries were practicing the principles of good signage for the benefit of their patrons. What changes were needed to improve the signage used for direction, identification, and orientation in the libraries.

4 Important Related Studies Creating the User-Friendly Library by Evaluating Patron Perception of Signage by Bosman & Rusinek Signage and the ADA by Johnson Effective Library Signage: A SPEC Kit by The Association of Research Libraries

5 Research Design Applied research with unobtrusive, indirect data collection was used to discover signage problems Population consisted of eight central public libraries in eight South Jersey counties (Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester, Ocean, and Salem). A checklist for directional, identification, and orientation signage criteria was used to collect data

6 Problem Problem: Are selected libraries practicing the principles of good signage for the benefit of their patrons? If not, what changes were needed to improve the signage?

7 Good Signage Findings Signage design (typeface, letter spacing, color contrast, use of symbols, and color combinations) Signage readability from a distance Sign Sequence and Positioning Sign Terminology (consistent, effective, and positive) Flexibility (signs could be changed or moved easily) At least one directory near one access point Physical condition

8 Good Signage Cont. ADA signs could be approached without encountering an object Braille signage Non-glare on permanent signs

9 Poor Signage Sign system integration with the building and furniture Upper and lower case letters Signs designating various departments, sections, and services Vandal proof signs Directories per floor Directional signage Book displays

10 Poor Signage Cont. Signage consistency for directional signs and identification signs Accessible elements displaying the International Symbol of Accessibility Perpendicular signs to the route of travel Permanent overhead signs lettering Installment of Braille signs on doors Braille signs 50% of the libraries were not ADA compliant

11 Conclusions to Study The eight central libraries in South Jersey rated well in areas such as signage design, size, sequence, self-service, lighting, flexibility, and non-glare Improvement was needed in areas such as sign system consistency and integration with the library facility Some signs were missing and most libraries did not meet ADA standards

12 Possibilities for Further Study Libraries could do their own evaluations using the checklist The checklist could be used at other libraries in the state or elsewhere Next time, the study could be done using description rather than percentages (qualitative research rather than quantitative)

13 Thank You Any questions?


Download ppt "Directional, Identification, and Orientation Signage in Eight Southern New Jersey Public Libraries A Presentation by Rachel Simmons."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google