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What We Did on Our Summer Break: The AMS Summer Policy Colloquium David SchultzNOAA/NSSL & CIMMS Scott Richardson OU/OCS/CIMMS/PSU Yvette Richardson OU/PSU.

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Presentation on theme: "What We Did on Our Summer Break: The AMS Summer Policy Colloquium David SchultzNOAA/NSSL & CIMMS Scott Richardson OU/OCS/CIMMS/PSU Yvette Richardson OU/PSU."— Presentation transcript:

1 What We Did on Our Summer Break: The AMS Summer Policy Colloquium David SchultzNOAA/NSSL & CIMMS Scott Richardson OU/OCS/CIMMS/PSU Yvette Richardson OU/PSU Russ Schneider NOAA/SPC Mark Shafer OU/OCS

2 Motivation “There has never been a greater need for sound public policy on meteorological and related issues. Too often, however, those decisions--whether in Congress or the executive branch agencies--are made without the adequate and incisive participation of technical experts, because of the relative sparse involvement of such experts in the policy-making process, especially on Capitol Hill.” From the AMS Summer Policy Colloquium web page

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4 AMS Atmospheric Policy Program Launched in Oct AAAS/AMS Congressional Science Fellowship Hurricane Policy Workshop, cosponsored with TWC First AMS Presidential Policy Forum: 2001 Annual Mtg AMS–OU Policy Forum on Weather, Climate, and Energy Summer Policy Colloquium left to right: Bill Hooke– Dir. Policy Colloquium Dick Greenfield–Dir. AMS APP Ron McPherson–Exec. Dir. AMS Loretta Jurnak –Admin. Support. (Abshire)

5 Policy Colloquium: The Facts 10 days: Sunday June 3 to Tuesday June 12 Activities from 7:30 am to 5:30 pm AAAS/AMS Offices, Washington, DC 14 graduate students paid for by AMS and UCAR 23 professionals in academics, government, public sector UCSD, PSU, Scripps, Harvard, Michigan, CU, Arizona, Princeton, MIT, OU, Washington, Wisconsin, Stanford COMET, Raytheon, Navy, NCAR, Lockheed-Martin, RS Information Systems, NSF NOAA: NWSFO, SPC, OGP, NSSL, NESDIS, FSL, NCEP, NWS HQ 21 women, 16 men Over 60 presenters

6 White House Picture (Abshire)

7 Schedule-1 Welcome, Introductions Lecture: Policy fundamentals Case Study: International Data Exchange, Resolution 40 Case Study: U.S. Global Change Research Program Capitol Hill visit: House Science and Technology Committee Majority Chief of Staff, Minority Staff Director Senate Staffers: AAAS Congressional Fellows Policy Initiative Exercise “A Top Ten for Science and Society”-Bob Crease, SUNYSB (Abshire)

8 Schedule-2 Executive Branch visit: Office of Management and Budget and Office of Science and Technology Policy representatives The British Parliament and Science Scene–Lord Julian Hunt Policy Analysts Panel Discussion Honorable Dr. D. Allan Bromley, former Bush Science Advisor Panel: Policy Shifts with respect to Energy and Climate Panel: Policy Shifts with respect to Natural Hazards Milestones in Private Sector Meteorology Debrief and feedback (S. Richardson)

9 Overheard at the Policy Colloquium “Partisanship is a substitute for good clean thinking.” Roger Pielke, Jr.

10 Overheard at the Policy Colloquium “Partisanship is a substitute for good clean thinking.” Roger Pielke, Jr. “If you’re $80,000 in debt, you can’t get out of it by playing 25- cent poker, maybe $25 poker. The problem is convincing yourself you’re a $25-poker player.” Mike Hall

11 Overheard at the Policy Colloquium “Partisanship is a substitute for good clean thinking.” Roger Pielke, Jr. “If you’re $80,000 in debt, you can’t get out of it by playing 25- cent poker, maybe $25 poker. The problem is convincing yourself you’re a $25-poker player.” Mike Hall “The power of [Capitol] Hill is the power of embarrassment.” Larry Dye

12 Overheard at the Policy Colloquium “Partisanship is a substitute for good clean thinking.” Roger Pielke, Jr. “If you’re $80,000 in debt, you can’t get out of it by playing 25- cent poker, maybe $25 poker. The problem is convincing yourself you’re a $25-poker player.” Mike Hall “The power of [Capitol] Hill is the power of embarrassment.” Larry Dye “The media is like a prism, systematically distorting what passes through it while giving the illusion of transparency.” Bob Crease

13 Overheard at the Policy Colloquium “We have 300 types of cheese and 1 type of nuclear reactor, but in the U.S., you have 1 type of cheese and 300 types of nuclear reactors.” French science minister

14 Overheard at the Policy Colloquium “We have 300 types of cheese and 1 type of nuclear reactor, but in the U.S., you have 1 type of cheese and 300 types of nuclear reactors.” French science minister “Europeans pay for our meteorology and get our medicine for free and it’s the other way around in the U.S.” Lord Julian Hunt

15 Overheard at the Policy Colloquium “We have 300 types of cheese and 1 type of nuclear reactor, but in the U.S., you have 1 type of cheese and 300 types of nuclear reactors.” French science minister “Europeans pay for our meteorology and get our medicine for free and it’s the other way around in the U.S.” Lord Julian Hunt “Mother Nature may come uninvited to the company picnic, but you can keep her out of the shareholder’s meeting.” Bob Dischel, CCM

16 Overheard at the Policy Colloquium “We have 300 types of cheese and 1 type of nuclear reactor, but in the U.S., you have 1 type of cheese and 300 types of nuclear reactors.” French science minister “Europeans pay for our meteorology and get our medicine for free and it’s the other way around in the U.S.” Lord Julian Hunt “Mother Nature may come uninvited to the company picnic, but you can keep her out of the shareholder’s meeting.” Bob Dischel, CCM “People like to create bureaucracy, but they don’t want to be seen creating bureaucracy.” Bryan Hannegan, Senate staffer

17 Overheard at the Policy Colloquium “If the public knew more about science, they might not fund science as much.” Roger Pielke, Jr. (Abshire)

18 Overheard at the Policy Colloquium “If the public knew more about science, they might not fund science as much.” Roger Pielke, Jr. “NOAA Research--it’s about the people.” Scott Gudes (Abshire)

19 Overheard at the Policy Colloquium “If the public knew more about science, they might not fund science as much.” Roger Pielke, Jr. “NOAA Research--it’s about the people.” Scott Gudes “Data in NOAA gets people excited. Data in Congress doesn’t.” Scott Gudes (Abshire)

20 Overheard at the Policy Colloquium “If the public knew more about science, they might not fund science as much.” Roger Pielke, Jr. “NOAA Research--it’s about the people.” Scott Gudes “Data in NOAA gets people excited. Data in Congress doesn’t.” Scott Gudes “Government employees are custodians of the public’s data.” Joel Myers (Abshire)

21 Overview of Today’s Presentation David SchultzOverview Russ Schneider Field Trips Mark Shafer Case Studies Yvette Richardson Initiative Exercise Scott Richardson Closing

22 Top Ten Lessons Learned (1) Congressional and Executive Branch staff have a lot of control in formulating and carrying out policy initiatives.

23 Top Ten Lessons Learned (1) Congressional and Executive Branch staff have a lot of control in formulating and carrying out policy initiatives. (2) It only takes a few ordinary people to make something happen.

24 Top Ten Lessons Learned (1) Congressional and Executive Branch staff have a lot of control in formulating and carrying out policy initiatives. (2) It only takes a few ordinary people to make something happen. (3) It amazes me how easy it is for poorly constructed initiatives to make it to through the legislature.

25 Top Ten Lessons Learned (1) Congressional and Executive Branch staff have a lot of control in formulating and carrying out policy initiatives. (2) It only takes a few ordinary people to make something happen. (3) It amazes me how easy it is for poorly constructed initiatives to make it to through the legislature. (4) The number of scientists lobbying the hill has increased tenfold in the last five years.

26 Top Ten Lessons Learned (1) Congressional and Executive Branch staff have a lot of control in formulating and carrying out policy initiatives. (2) It only takes a few ordinary people to make something happen. (3) It amazes me how easy it is for poorly constructed initiatives to make it to through the legislature. (4) The number of scientists lobbying the hill has increased tenfold in the last five years. (5) It’s easy to get authorization for bills. It’s more difficult to get appropriations (e.g., money).

27 Top Ten Lessons Learned (6) Sometimes too much enthusiasm can hurt your cause.

28 Top Ten Lessons Learned (6) Sometimes too much enthusiasm can hurt your cause. (7) Media interaction is important to building support and promoting good science.

29 Top Ten Lessons Learned (6) Sometimes too much enthusiasm can hurt your cause. (7) Media interaction is important to building support and promoting good science. (8) Thus, communication skills are important.

30 Top Ten Lessons Learned (6) Sometimes too much enthusiasm can hurt your cause. (7) Media interaction is important to building support and promoting good science. (8) Thus, communication skills are important. (9) Get to know your own representative and senators (not during crisis time)

31 Top Ten Lessons Learned (6) Sometimes too much enthusiasm can hurt your cause. (7) Media interaction is important to building support and promoting good science. (8) Thus, communication skills are important. (9) Get to know your own representative and senators (not during crisis time) (10) Refine your arguments when testifying to Congress, speaking to media, etc. A one-page summary is more effective than the most-detailed research report.

32 “The final evaluation of this Colloquium and its effectiveness can only come further down the road and is not ours alone to judge. An analogy: the field phase of an experiment cannot be successful in and of itself so much as it leads to analysis, interpretation, and ultimately, new understanding, not just on the part of the experimenters themselves, but also to the broader community. In the same way, the meteorological community is making a long-term investment in these Colloquia and in you. The goal is more effective meteorological services to the greater society,sustained over periods of many years. The Colloquium will have fulfilled its purpose only to the extent it helps each of you realize your potential, foster your collaborations with those you’ve met here, and inspire and nurture others who will work with and for you in the future. Bill Hooke, 29 June 2001


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