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The Link between Nutrition and Physical Activity, and Academic Achievement Welcome! Partner: California Department of Education, Nutrition Services Division.

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Presentation on theme: "The Link between Nutrition and Physical Activity, and Academic Achievement Welcome! Partner: California Department of Education, Nutrition Services Division."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Link between Nutrition and Physical Activity, and Academic Achievement Welcome! Partner: California Department of Education, Nutrition Services Division This program was developed by the California Department of Education’s Nutrition Services Division, with funding from The California Endowment. Revisions were completed with funds from the California Department of Public Health, Network for a Healthy California, funded by the United Sates Department of Agriculture’s Supplementary Nutrition Assistance Program (formerly the Food Stamp Program). These institutions are equal opportunity providers and employers. In California, food stamps provide assistance to low-income households, and can help buy nutritious foods for better health. For food stamp information, call For important nutrition information visit

2 The Link between Nutrition and Physical Activity, and Academic Achievement [Enter your name here] [Enter your title here] [Enter your agency affiliation here] Enter your phone number here] Enter your address here]

3 Objectives of this Training Identify three ways that nutrition and physical activity impact health. Identify three ways that nutrition and physical activity impact learning. Describe risky nutrition and physical activity behavior trends and access appropriate local reports. Brainstorm action steps to address the Link between Nutrition and Physical Activity, and Academic Achievement.

4 Health Check - Quiz 1.On average, Americans meet the recommended percent of calories from fat (20% to 35%). 2.In the last ten years, Americans have decreased their intake of sweeteners. 3.Approximately 75% of Californian adults are active at least 5 days a week for 30 minutes a day.

5 Nutrition and Physical Activity Trends

6 Nutrition and Physical Activity Trends Are Americans Physically Active?

7 The Food Guide Pyramid

8 Nutrition and Physical Activity Trends How are Americans Eating? Number of Servings American’s Are Eating: Grains 6.8 (1 whole grain) Vegetables3.2 servings Fruit1.5 servings Meat4.9 servings Dairy1.5 servings USDA Dietary Recommendations: Grains6-10 servings (3 whole grain) Vegetables5 servings Fruit4 servings Meat 2-3 servings Dairy2-3 servings Recommendations based on MyPyramid and the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2005 and consumption data is from the Continuing Survey of Food Intake by Individuals (CSFII),

9 Health Implications Actual Causes of Death, 2000 United States Source: Mokolad, et. al. (2004). Actual Causes of Death in the United States, JAMA, 291:

10 Health Implications Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults between 1985 and 2008 Definitions: Obesity: Body Mass Index (BMI) of 30 or higher. (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) Body Mass Index (BMI): A measure of an adult’s weight in relation to his or her height, specifically the adult’s weight in kilograms divided by the square of his or her height in meters. Definitions: Obesity: Body Mass Index (BMI) of 30 or higher. (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) Body Mass Index (BMI): A measure of an adult’s weight in relation to his or her height, specifically the adult’s weight in kilograms divided by the square of his or her height in meters.

11 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1985 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14%

12 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1990 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14%

13 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1995 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

14 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2000 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20%

15 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2005 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%

16 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2008 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%

17 1999 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1990, 1999, 2008 (*BMI 30, or about 30 lbs. overweight for 5’4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%

18 Student Nutrition and Physical Activity Trends American children obtained 50 percent of calories from added fat and sugar – and 65 percent of California teens reported eating 2 or more servings of sodas and low nutrient foods Only 33 percent of California teens eat the recommended servings of fruit and vegetables 50 percent of California teens reported eating no servings of vegetables 60 percent of California children do not meet the recommended 60 minutes of physical activity 2004 CalTEENS Data, California Department of Public Health, Public Health Institute, Cancer Prevention and Nutrition Section, Research and Evaluation Unit.

19 Student Health Implications Overweight Children in California Map Legend Image source: California Center for Public Health Advocacy-2003 In California, almost 34 percent of 9 to 11 year olds and 21 percent of 12 to 17 year olds are either overweight or at risk for being overweight

20 Student Health Implications 80% of obese adolescents remain obese as adults An increase in childhood type 2 diabetes is paralleling the rising rates of obesity and overweight Risk factors for heart disease now seen in children Dental caries affects 50 percent of youths ages 5 to 17 Nutrition and Youth Health Statistics. (2005) California Project LEAN, Healthy Food Policy Resource Guide.

21 Student Academic Implications “Healthier students …typically do better in school…We know that strong bodies and strong minds work together to help…our students succeed.” December 2008 Jack O’Connell State Superintendent of Public Instruction

22 Poor Nutrition Impacts School Achievement Malnutrition and moderate under nutrition can have lasting effects on cognitive development Children’s brain function is diminished by short-term or periodic hunger or malnutrition skipping meals Anemia shortens attention span, causes irritability, fatigue, and difficulty concentrating

23 Children’s Eating Habits What % of children under age 12 are hungry or at-risk for hunger? What % of children are likely to skip breakfast?

24 Think about a time when you had a very busy day and you did not get a chance to eat breakfast and there was no food available to snack on when you started to feel hungry. How did you feel after six hours of no food?

25 Children’s Eating Habits What is the most prevalent nutrition deficiency disease? What % of low-income children have this disease?

26 Poor Nutrition Impacts School Achievement Fatigue/lethargic/irritable Susceptible to infection Stomach pain/headaches Anxiety/anger/indecisiveness Sleepiness

27 Good Nutrition Enhances School Achievement Better performance Better concentration Improved attention span Quicker and more accurate retrieval of information Fewer errors in problem-solving activities Less absenteeism Fewer behavioral problems

28 Time Meal eaten and energy released from sugar Energy Release Energy Available For Learning Sugary vs. Balanced Breakfast Meal eaten and Energy released Energy released energy released from protein from fat from sugar and starch Sections of “Better Breakfast, Better Learning” reprinted with permission from the Child Nutrition and Food Distribution Division, California Department of Education

29 Nutrition and Physical Activity Impact School Scores!!

30 Breakfast Consumption and API Scores (Concurrent Relationship) API Score Percent who ate breakfast 1st (Lowest) 2nd 3rd 4th 5th (Highest) API Quintile

31 Breakfast Consumption and API Scores (Concurrent Relationship) ReadingLanguageMathematics Percent who ate breakfast Change in SAT-9 (NPR) Source: California Healthy Kids Survey & STAR data files.

32 Nutritious Intake and API Scores (Concurrent Relationship) API Score Percent reporting any nutritious intake 1st (Lowest) 2nd 3rd 4th 5th (Highest) API Quintile

33 Garden Education Raises Science Scores Students in third, fourth and fifth grade participated in school gardening activities –Weekly garden reinforced by hands-on classroom activities Higher science achievement scores compared to those who did not have garden activities –Klemmer, Waliczek, 2005 (Louisianna schools)

34 Physical Activity and Fitness affects School Achievement Higher achievement was associated with higher levels of fitness at each grade level tested Strong relationship between fitness, reading, and math scores at each grade level Greatest gains when students met 3 or more minimum fitness standards

35 Grade 5 SAT-9 and Physical Fitness Scores Source:

36 Grade 7 SAT-9 and Physical Fitness Scores Source:

37 Grade 9 SAT-9 and Physical Fitness Scores Source:

38 Physical Activity and API Scores (Concurrent Relationship) API Score Percent who engaged in any physical activity 1st (Lowest) 2nd 3rd 4th 5th (Highest) API Quintile

39 In addition… Another study demonstrated that increased physical activity (240 minutes per week) leads to consistently higher mathematics scores (Symons CW, et al. Bridging student health risks and academic achievement through comprehensive school health programs. Journal of School Health 1997;67(6): ) And yet another demonstrated that students involved with the school breakfast program or physical activity program are calmer in class and more energetic when studying (Shepard, RJ. Curricular physical activity and academic performance. Pediatric Exercise Science 1997;9:

40 Student Health and Physical Education Raises Scores Health Education: Third and fourth grade students who received comprehensive health education had significantly higher reading and math scores. Schoener, Guerrero, and Whitney, 1988 Intensive Physical Education programs had higher reading, math and writing scores and reduced disruptive behaviors in the classroom. Sallis, 1999

41 41 “We must understand this important truth: that improving children’s health likely improves school performance. It may even help a school’s bottom line.” David Satcher

42 Health Affects Attendance Students with poor nutrition & physical fitness more likely to be absent and tardy. Murphy, 1998 Very overweight students miss 4-6 times more school than normal weight kids. Schwimmer 2003;AHK

43 What You Can Do! Share District Data with Vision - Make the connection between health and academics with district-specific data - Get others involved Integrate Nutrition and Physical Activity Into Your District’s Achievement Strategic Plans –Discuss District Wellness Policy – Include Nutrition and Physical Activity in Program Improvement – Emphasize turn-key approaches

44 What can you do? Be a role model! Your students look up to you! Help teach nutrition education in the classroom using educational material linked to content standards. There are great resources available! Incorporate some form of physical activity in your classroom. Every minute helps! Be active with your school’s Network for a Healthy California !

45 Other Resources California Healthy Kids Resource Center: American Cancer Society: USDA: Local School Wellness Policy: html Action for Healthy Kids:

46 Other Resources The California Food Guide: s/Pages/CaliforniaFoodGuide.aspx s/Pages/CaliforniaFoodGuide.aspx California Project LEAN: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: USDA MyPyramid:

47 Remember The Man Who Believes He Can Do Something Is Probably Right, And So is the Man Who Believes He Can’t

48 Thank You! For more information or assistance, please contact: Partner: California Department of Education, Nutrition Services Division This program was developed by the California Department of Education’s Nutrition Services Division, with funding from The California Endowment. Revisions were completed with funds from the California Department of Public Health, Network for a Healthy California, funded by the United Sates Department of Agriculture’s Supplementary Nutrition Assistance Program (formerly the Food Stamp Program). These institutions are equal opportunity providers and employers. In California, food stamps provide assistance to low-income households, and can help buy nutritious foods for better health. For food stamp information, call For important nutrition information visit


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