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Students Constructing Their Own Knowledge to Understand Mutation Lauren Schultz, Trista Strauch, Tasia Taxis, Lindsey Veautour Facilitator: John Merrill.

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Presentation on theme: "Students Constructing Their Own Knowledge to Understand Mutation Lauren Schultz, Trista Strauch, Tasia Taxis, Lindsey Veautour Facilitator: John Merrill."— Presentation transcript:

1 Students Constructing Their Own Knowledge to Understand Mutation Lauren Schultz, Trista Strauch, Tasia Taxis, Lindsey Veautour Facilitator: John Merrill

2 Background Please respond as a student in intro bio You’ve been exposed to basic info about mutation, phenotype, genotype, and central dogma.

3 30-Second Sentence Write down a definition of mutation

4 1. An organism fails to thrive in its environment. Is this a mutation? YesA NoB

5 2. An organism is exceptionally successful in its environment. Is this a mutation? YesA NoB

6 3. An organism has a new variant protein that is detrimental. Is this a mutation? YesA NoB

7 4. An organism has a new variant protein that is beneficial. Is this a mutation? YesA NoB

8 5. There is a genetic change that results in no change in the protein. Is this a mutation? YesA NoB

9 1.An organism fails to thrive in its environment. 2.An organism is exceptionally successful in its environment. 3.An organism has a new variant protein that is detrimental. 4.An organism has a new variant protein that is beneficial. 5.There is a genetic change that results in no change in the protein.

10

11 Vote Positive Mutation A Negative Mutation B

12 Defend your vote to your neighbor

13 Revote Positive Mutation A Negative Mutation B

14 Holstein Piedmontese Belgian Blue

15 Teaching Challenge Students memorize a definition of mutation as a “change in the genetic material,” but hold onto misconceptions that are at odds with this definition. Teachable Unit Framework

16 Learning Objectives  Students will formulate a working definition of a mutation and use it assess whether a mutation has occurred. Tidbit One- 30 second paper, Guided-Inquiry Clicker Qs  Given various scenarios, students will be able to evaluate whether a mutation will lead to a phenotypic variation. Tidbit Two- Double-Muscle Cattle Scenario  Students will be able to predict how a given mutation would change an individual’s fitness in a specific environment.  Students will be able to show that mutations comprise the basis of genetic variability in a population. Teachable Unit Framework

17 Sickle-Cell Case Study- Mutations can affect an organism’s fitness based on environment. Tidbit #3

18 A mutation occurs such that there is a single amino acid change in the resultant protein. If an individual has two copies of this mutated gene, an illness occurs that can lead to frequent infections and shortened lifespan. Individuals with a single copy of this variant have 60% protection against mortality from an endemic disease. Would you expect this gene variant to persist in the population? Tidbit #3

19 Coat Color Variation Scenario- Mutations comprise the basis of genetic variability. Tidbit #4

20 A small group of animals moves from the mainland to an island, founding a new population. There is no subsequent movement of animals on or off the island. This initial population included coat color variation. Some years afterward, however, a new pattern variation arose that was previously not observed in the population. Following subsequent genetic analysis, it is determined that this haircoat is the result of a new variant of a protein. In simplest terms, how did it arise? Tidbit #4

21 Post Class Formative Assessment Question # Change in DNA Change in Protein Change in Phenotype Effect on Organism Is this a Mutation? Why or Why Not? 1Yes NegativeYThere is a change in DNA. 2Yes PositiveYThere is a change in DNA. 3Yes NoneYThere is a change in DNA. 4Yes NoNoneYThere is a change in DNA. 5YesNo NoneYThere is a change in DNA. 6NoYesNoNoneNNo change in DNA. 7No NoneNNo change in DNA. Learning Objectives 1 and 2

22 Post Class Formative Assessment Learning Objectives 3 and 4 You have new variations of haircoat—dark with stripes, dark with no stripes, light with stripes, and light with no stripes. Consider the selective pressures that might exist on an island, and how this variation in coat color and pattern could impact survival and fitness in different habitats on the island. Pick one of the coat colors and describe an environment on this island where you think this variant would have better fitness than the other variants.

23 Summative Assessment Learning Objectives 1 and 2 ACTGCCTGATACATGTAGGC Based on the sequence above decide whether a mutation occurred, and predict any effect on the population. Suppose the sequence shown above is part of the non-coding portion of a chromosome. The first G from the left in the above sequence changes to an A. Did a mutation occur? Predicted effect on the population: Suppose the sequence shown above is part of the non-coding portion of a chromosome. The first G from the left in the above sequence changes to a C. Did a mutation occur? Predicted effect on the population:

24 Thank you!


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