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Www.monash.edu.au Strategies & programs for a healthy workforce Sally Trembath Hastings Manager, Community Services (Clayton Campus) Monash University.

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Presentation on theme: "Www.monash.edu.au Strategies & programs for a healthy workforce Sally Trembath Hastings Manager, Community Services (Clayton Campus) Monash University."— Presentation transcript:

1 Strategies & programs for a healthy workforce Sally Trembath Hastings Manager, Community Services (Clayton Campus) Monash University

2 2 health promotion programs healthy lifestyle habits employee assistance programs OHSE staff development programs to improve performance and productivity work-life programs Healthy Workforce * safety * health * stress

3 3 Simply the best workplaces in Australia Dr. Daryl Hull & Vivienne Read, Key differentiators leadership having a say clear values sense of ownership & identify learning Autonomy & uniqueness receiving feedback pay & conditions recruitment built environment community connections having fun passion sense of ownership & identify learning Autonomy & uniqueness receiving feedback pay & conditions recruitment built environment community connections having fun passion being safe working relationships

4 4 Identified as one of top 5 drivers of excellent workplaces. physical and psychological safety OHS&E policies and procedures compliance and risk management security working together for a safer community: guidelines for managing threatening or inappropriate behaviour. An approach which balances caring for the ‘client’ and doing what we can to protect the safety of all involved. Being Safe

5 5 Types of Threats Threats to kill Threats of violence Threats to damage property Threats against family, friends, colleagues Threats to defame or slander Threats of litigation Threats to self harm, suicide - can be inferred or veiled threats

6 6 Types of Inappropriate Behaviour Act of physical violence or property damage Stalking Sexual harassment or discrimination Self harming Communication or behaviour which is outside everyday expression and arouses anxiety and challenges one’s own sense of normality/reality

7 7 Organisational Response Several Monash departments have collaborated to produce a model of responding that considers the University’s legal obligations, the need to provide safety on campus, and commitment to equal opportunity and free speech. Education and training regarding policy procedures Increasing awareness of individuals to take responsibility for safety within the Monash Community Clear guidelines of response and management

8 8 One Day Seminar: working together for a safer community persistent complainers threateners: violence and self harm stalkers managing situations  emotional disturbance  threats  boundaries and limits  safety plans  self-care Presenters:Leading forensic psychiatrists and psychologists; Professor Paul Mullen Professor James Ogloff Lisa Warren University Deputy Solicitor

9 9 Managing Threatening & Inappropriate behaviour IDENTIFY “AT RISK” PERSON COMPLIANT SAFETY PLAN MAY BE APPROPRIATE NON-COMPLIANT IDENTIFY STAKEHOLDERS DEVELOP SAFETY PLAN SOLICITOR PROCEEDS ON DISCIPLINE OR HEALTH GROUNDS RESOLUTION

10 10 Safety Plan Indentify Stakeholders Monash CommunityExternal Community Investigation Supervisor University Solicitor Counselling Service Faculty HOD, Dean General Staff Managers Employee Relations OHS&E Disability Liaison Mental Health Providers  private psychiatrist  forensic services  mobile crisis assessment & treatment team Family network Social network

11 11 Meeting of Stakeholders gain understanding of situation through shared information consider possible interventions and management strategies consult university solicitor for legal advice decide on plan  Roles and tasks  Timing identify possible psycho-social triggers eg. discipline hearing and plan safety strategies coordinate documentation

12 12 Prevention Primary Interventions: aim at reducing stressors or causes of risk. Secondary Interventions: aim at reducing symptoms. Current research emphasises the need to improve organisational climate and increase employee morale.

13 13 Early Intervention Case Management Group  Employee relations  OHS&E  HR, Employer assistance & rehabilitation  Counselling Main advantage is in making appropriate referrals and interventions to resolve issues before resorting to formal processes. Assists identification of ‘hot spots’

14 14 The broad aim of THRIVE © is to help participants reduce stress symptoms and negative affect, and increase positive affect, by offering a range of skills to be used in the workplace and private life. Research All participants rate discomfort level on a range of physical, emotional and cognitive symptoms. THRIVE© at Work

15 15 THRIVE© offers: Sponsored by SSSD An 8 week cycle of one hour sessions Lunchtime or 5pm Join at any time Make up missed sessions in subsequent cycles Workbook provided by SSSD Relaxation CD Homework Two individual coaching sessions Presented by experienced psychologists

16 16 THRIVE: TOOLS FOR HEALTH, RESILIENCE, INSIGHT, VITALITY & EMPOWERMENT AT WORK THE CYCLE OF SESSIONS To enquire, contact or phone Community Services on to THRIVE is an initiative of University Community Services and is supported by Student & Staff Services Division Copyright © 2003 MUCS Introduction Sources of stress How you react to stress Treating symptoms of stress Body awareness & breathing How mind & body interact To recognise tension in the body Tension release exercises To breathe properly Equal breathing technique Relaxation Releasing chronic muscle tension Progessive muscle relaxation Meditation for awareness & concentration Meditation techniques Mindfulness Sleep To allow time-out for sleep About sleep inhibitors About sleep promoters About a drug-free sleep program Job Stress Identify your symptoms & sources of job stress Motivate, pace & balance yourself Manage conflict Assertiveness Stop being passive Express your feelings and opinions Listen assertively Avoid conflict and manipulation Worry control How to stop worrying How to start problem- solving How to cope with stressful situations Rational thinking To decide what you can change How thoughts influence your emotions, body & behaviour To counteract needless distressing thoughts To change distress to effective emotion

17 Participant response to the relevance and effectiveness of the program (administered after session 8). 2. Participant self-ratings on stress symptoms and emotions.  Before program  End of 8 week program  3 month follow-up Program evaluated in 2 ways:

18 18 i.“Stress-related symptom questionnaire” 36 symptoms, rated 0 (n/a) – 10 (extreme discomfort) Nominate 2 ‘target symptoms’ ii. Positive and Negative Affect Scale 20 feelings - rated on how much they have been experienced in ‘past week or so’ 1 (very slightly/not at all) – 5 (very much) Positive affect = morale Negative affect = distress Participant self-ratings

19 19 The most commonly chosen target symptoms are: Job Stress 22% Unwanted Thoughts 12% Sleeping Problems 22% Powerlessness 10% General Anxiety14% Low Self-esteem 10% Muscular Tension13% Average discomfort rating for 1 st and 2 nd Target Symptom 4 – 7 Moderate8 – 10 Extreme Target 1Target 2 Before Program End Program4.86 *4.27 * Follow Up4.67 *4.38 * * sig. at P <.001

20 20 Highest-rated symptoms (all participants)

21 21 Positive & Negative AFFECT (distress) (morale) Emotion: those significantly improved after THRIVE©  powerlessness  irritability  anger  depression  self-esteem

22 22 There is much positive feedback. Some participants express gratitude to Monash; many learn to ‘let go’ of worries, do regular exercise and relaxation; state their needs, and worry less. Where THRIVE© is run with a specific work group, they report positive benefits for the group eg. improved cohesion and communication. Overall

23 Overall effectiveness of various employee support functions is uncertain. 2.Employees who use these services give high satisfaction ratings suggesting that these services have a positive function in that they constitute a gesture of employer support that contributes toward maintaining employee morale. Research

24 24 Simply the best workplaces in Australia Dr. Daryl Hull & Vivienne Read, Key differentiators working relationships leadership having a say clear values being safe sense of ownership & identify learning Autonomy & uniqueness receiving feedback pay & conditions recruitment built environment community connections having fun passion sense of ownership & identify learning Autonomy & uniqueness receiving feedback pay & conditions recruitment built environment community connections having fun passion


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