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Archaebacteria Cameron Gordon, Daniel Power & Garrison Seto.

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Presentation on theme: "Archaebacteria Cameron Gordon, Daniel Power & Garrison Seto."— Presentation transcript:

1 Archaebacteria Cameron Gordon, Daniel Power & Garrison Seto

2 What is Archaebacteria? Archaebacteria are the oldest living organisms on earth. They are prokaryotes and unicellular. Archaebacteria are found in very harsh conditions. Methanogens, halophiles, thermoacidophiles are phyla of atchaebacteria. Archaebacteria are the oldest living organisms on earth. They are prokaryotes and unicellular. Archaebacteria are found in very harsh conditions. Methanogens, halophiles, thermoacidophiles are phyla of atchaebacteria.

3 Phylum Thermophiles are the heat-loving bacteria found near hydrothermal vents and hot springs. Thermophiles are the heat-loving bacteria found near hydrothermal vents and hot springs. The methanogens are anaerobic bacteria that produce methane. They are found in sewage treatment plants, bogs, and the intestinal tracts of ruminants. The methanogens are anaerobic bacteria that produce methane. They are found in sewage treatment plants, bogs, and the intestinal tracts of ruminants. Halophiles are bacteria that thrive in high salt concentrations such as those found in salt lakes or pools of sea water. Halophiles are bacteria that thrive in high salt concentrations such as those found in salt lakes or pools of sea water.

4 Anatomy Archaebacteria are prokaryotic cells, that means that they do not have any membrane bound organelles and they do not have a true nucleus, although they do have a nuclear region. Archaebacteria have cell walls for structure and flagella for movement. Archaebacteria are prokaryotic cells, that means that they do not have any membrane bound organelles and they do not have a true nucleus, although they do have a nuclear region. Archaebacteria have cell walls for structure and flagella for movement.

5 Locomotion Methanogens, halophiles & thermoacidophiles all move around the same way, they use their flagella like a rotating motor to help them propel themselves where they need to go whether to get food or get away from a toxin. Methanogens, halophiles & thermoacidophiles all move around the same way, they use their flagella like a rotating motor to help them propel themselves where they need to go whether to get food or get away from a toxin.

6 Mathanogens Obtaining Food There are three phyla, or groups, of archaebacteria. The methanogens are characterized by their ability to harvest energy by converting H2 and CO2 into methane gas. They are often found in the stomachs of cows. There are three phyla, or groups, of archaebacteria. The methanogens are characterized by their ability to harvest energy by converting H2 and CO2 into methane gas. They are often found in the stomachs of cows.

7 Halophiles Obtaining Food The second phylum is the halophiles. These organisms are salt-loving. Though salt kills most bacteria, it helps the extreme halophiles to thrive. They are found in the Dead Sea, the Great Salt Lake, and other areas with a high salt content. The second phylum is the halophiles. These organisms are salt-loving. Though salt kills most bacteria, it helps the extreme halophiles to thrive. They are found in the Dead Sea, the Great Salt Lake, and other areas with a high salt content.

8 Thermoacidophiles Obtaining Food The third phylum is the thermoacidophiles. These bacteria are found in extremely acidic conditions and in areas with very high temperatures. They can survive in volcanic vents and hydrothermal vents (cracks in the ocean floor where scalding water leaks out). The third phylum is the thermoacidophiles. These bacteria are found in extremely acidic conditions and in areas with very high temperatures. They can survive in volcanic vents and hydrothermal vents (cracks in the ocean floor where scalding water leaks out).

9 What do Archaebacteria Eat? Archaebacteria don’t actually eat anything. This is because archaebacteria are considered to be chemosynthetic organisms. Being a chemosynthetic organism means that they get their nutrients and energy from absorbing certain chemicals. Archaebacteria don’t actually eat anything. This is because archaebacteria are considered to be chemosynthetic organisms. Being a chemosynthetic organism means that they get their nutrients and energy from absorbing certain chemicals.

10 Digestion Archaebacteria digest their food through endocytosis which is extracellular and nutrients are absorbed into the cell directly through the membrane. Archaebacteria digest their food through endocytosis which is extracellular and nutrients are absorbed into the cell directly through the membrane.

11 Excretion Archaebacteria excrete waste through diffusion. They release waste particles through their cell membrane as a liquid or a gas, methanogens produce methane gas as waste product. Archaebacteria excrete waste through diffusion. They release waste particles through their cell membrane as a liquid or a gas, methanogens produce methane gas as waste product.

12 Circulation Archaebacteria do not have or need a circulatory system because they are single celled organisms and they can get nutrients directly through the cell membrane. Archaebacteria do not have or need a circulatory system because they are single celled organisms and they can get nutrients directly through the cell membrane.

13 Respiration Like humans, bacteria need to breathe. In some cases, bacteria use oxygen to breathe, as humans do. In other situations, bacteria use different types of respiration, the two types are aerobic and anaerobic respiration. Aerobic respiration requires oxygen and is efficient. Anaerobic respiration do not require any oxygen but isn’t very efficient. Like humans, bacteria need to breathe. In some cases, bacteria use oxygen to breathe, as humans do. In other situations, bacteria use different types of respiration, the two types are aerobic and anaerobic respiration. Aerobic respiration requires oxygen and is efficient. Anaerobic respiration do not require any oxygen but isn’t very efficient.

14 Life Cycle Archaebacteria reproduce asexually and undergo binary fission to create new cells. Archaebacteria reproduce asexually and undergo binary fission to create new cells.

15 Video ube.com/watch? v=ZskEUGRlqrI ube.com/watch? v=ZskEUGRlqrI ube.com/watch? v=ZskEUGRlqrI ube.com/watch? v=ZskEUGRlqrI

16 Bibliography characteristics.html characteristics.html characteristics.html characteristics.html archaebacteria html archaebacteria html archaebacteria html archaebacteria html respiration/#ixzz1JYJA8BwP respiration/#ixzz1JYJA8BwP respiration/#ixzz1JYJA8BwP respiration/#ixzz1JYJA8BwP


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