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Measuring Child Well-being Across Cultures Paul Stephenson, Senior Director, Child Development and Rights ISCI Conference York 2011, UK 1.

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Presentation on theme: "Measuring Child Well-being Across Cultures Paul Stephenson, Senior Director, Child Development and Rights ISCI Conference York 2011, UK 1."— Presentation transcript:

1 Measuring Child Well-being Across Cultures Paul Stephenson, Senior Director, Child Development and Rights ISCI Conference York 2011, UK 1

2 Session Overview World Vision’s goal and targets for child well-being Why positive youth development and assets? How can we measure children’s well-being? DAP use outside the USA Future directions 2

3 World Vision’s Ministry Goal The sustained well-being of children, within their families and communities, especially the most vulnerable.

4 Child Well-being Aspirations & Outcomes

5 Experience love of God and neighbour Targets

6 Session Overview Why positive youth development and why assets? 6

7 7 The 40 Development Assets Examples of Assets Family support Other adult relationships Service to others Responsibility Positive peer influence Planning & decision making Sense of purpose Powerful impact on lives Grounded in extensive research Measurable Practical and actionable Empowering Politically, ideologically inclusive Flexible and adaptable Credible among gatekeepers

8 ExternalInternal SupportCommitment to Learning EmpowermentPositive Values Boundaries & ExpectationsSocial Competencies Constructive Use of TimePositive Identity Categories of Developmental Assets

9 Why assets matter Reduced Risks Increased Thriving Resilience 40 Developmental Assets The more assets, the better U. S.: True across... Socioeconomic status Race/ethnicity Family composition Gender

10 10 Increased Thriving (U.S. Data) Reduced Risks (U. S. Data) Why assets matter

11 11 Key Asset-Building Messages All young people need assets Everyone can build assets Relationships are key Little things add up Asset building is an ongoing process

12 Session Overview How can we measure children’s well-being? The Developmental Assets Profile (DAP) 12

13 The Developmental Assets Profile Short measure of Developmental Assets Framework Developed in –58 item survey – likert scale –Children ages 12 to 18 (6 th grade reading level) –Quantitative measure Tracks change over time Individually or random sample Can be linked to other measures or data points Qualitative approaches Focus groups

14 Holistic view of thriving Children’s perspectives Quantitatively rigorous User-friendly & empowering Multi-use (mobilising, programming, monitoring, coaching) Correlates with other measures Cross-cultural relevance Multi-country applicability and analysis Sector recognised toolkit What are the strengths of the DAP?

15 Session Overview How does the DAP connect with WV’s Child well-being outcomes (CWBO)? 15

16 Internal assets External assets Internal and external assets DAP and CWBOs

17 Session Overview DAP use outside the USA 17

18 Exploring Assets Globally International Groups Aga Khan Development Network Educational Development Center Oasis Global Save the Children World Vision International U. S. Peace Corps YMCA International Countries (DAP data) Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Bolivia, Brazil, China, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Egypt, Gaza, Iraq, Japan, Jordan, Lebanon, Mexico, Morocco, Nepal, Philippines, Yemen

19 Albania (2009) World Vision Int’l Albanian 259 youth Japan (2008) Yamaguchi Univ. Japanese 13,500 youth Bangladesh ( ) Save the Children Bengali 498 youth Philippines ( ) EDC Tagalog 703 youth Lebanon (2008) American Univ. Beirut Arabic 1,138 youth

20 Design Review and revise items Translate and back-translate Face Validity (Is it culturally meaningful?) Input from experts Input from youth, parents, teachers, elders, etc. Developing a Useful Measurement Tool U.S. DAP (English) Utilization Training for utilization Baseline / norm sample Evaluation Program improvement Research Testing (Reliability & Validity) Pretest/Review Pilot test Analyze/revise Field test

21 Scale Reliabilities: Categories United States JapanAlbaniaLebanon BangladeshPhilippines T1T2T1T2 Support Empowerment Boundaries & Expectations Constructive Use of Time Commitment to Learning Positive Values Social Competencies Positive Identity Promising.60 Acceptable.80 Good.90 Excellent

22 Stability Reliability (Test-Retest) U.S.: All test-retest coefficients were acceptable (.60 or higher) Albania (n = 51): 8 of 15 tests showed acceptable stability Bangladesh (n=119): 0 of 16 showed acceptable stability Philippines (n = 164): 3 of 8 tests showed acceptable stability Refinement needed before using longitudinally

23 Overall DAP Scores United States JapanAlbaniaLebanon BangladeshPhilippines T1T2T1T2 Excellent 15% 3%5%1%8%3%14% Good 34%50%48%37%10%55%20%31% Fair 38%33%44%47%58%35%61%46% Poor 14%2%5%11%31%3%16%8% (Samples are not representative of the countries) Potential for measuring program impact

24 Final Thoughts: Utility of the DAP Appears to be useful in many contexts and cultures AND There’s still work to do –Promising levels of internal reliability on most measures –Stability reliability less consistent across countries –Most items are translatable –See both expected consistency and variability –Large pre-post changes

25 Final Thoughts: Future Directions Linking independent efforts –Cost sharing and mutual learning –Strategic priority setting within regions –Increased impact in the global policy/program discussion Testing content validity –Link to sectoral outcomes, behavioral measures, etc. –Larger, more representative, more diverse samples Addressing the areas with less reliability –E.g., constructive use of time, empowerment Measurement of different age groups Moving from research to practice (and policy)

26 Thanks! 26 Paul Stephenson Phone: Gene Roehlkepartain Search Institute Phone:+ 1 (612) Web:www.search-institute.org


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