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Albania “Light” Capacity Assessment Workshop November 5, 2008 Toolkit adapted version.

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Presentation on theme: "Albania “Light” Capacity Assessment Workshop November 5, 2008 Toolkit adapted version."— Presentation transcript:

1 Albania “Light” Capacity Assessment Workshop November 5, 2008 Toolkit adapted version

2 OBJECTIVES OF TODAY Identify the required capacities for delivering the current One UN programme Identify the required capacities for fulfilling the role of the UN system in 5-10 years Agree on what we should maintain from the current situation and what we should change to ensure we are ready to play the role we aspire to in the 'desired future state' Develop an action plan and communicate it to staff and other stakeholders 1

3 AGENDA TimingSession 08.30 – 08.45Welcome and introduction (introduction by Gulden Turkoz-Cosslett) 08.45 – 10.15Setting expectations for future role and capacity of the UN in Albania (facilitation by GCMST) 10.15 – 10.30Coffee break 10.30 – 12.15Review of current capacity (presentation and facilitation by GCMST) 12.15 – 13.15Lunch 13.15 – 15.45Plan for the way forward (facilitation by GCMST) 15.45 – 16.00Coffee break 16.00 – 17.00Action plan and key messages for communications (facilitation by GCMST) 2

4 NATIONAL STRATEGY: VISION FOR ALBANIA IN 2013 3 A country with high living standards, which is integrated in the European and Euro-Atlantic structures, is democratic and guarantees the fundamental human rights and liberties. Priorities: 1.Integrate the county into the European Union and NATO 2.Develop and consolidate the democratic state, exercise good governance, fight corruption and guarantee the functioning of the rule of law* 3.Achieve rapid, balanced and sustainable economic, social and human development** * Covers electoral reform, justice system, property rights, corruption, public order public administration, decentralization, National Civil Status Registry ** Covers transport, energy, water supply and sanitation, environment, economic growth, macroeconomic stability, fiscal system, business climate, labour market, poverty rate, social policy, equal opportunities, public pension system, public health system, education system, spatial planning, regional development, agricultural and rural development Source: National Strategy for Development and Integration 2007-2013 (nsdi), March 2008

5 NATIONAL STRATEGY: CURRENT DONOR PROGRAMMING AND SECTOR FOCUS AREAS (EXCLUDING UN AND OTHER “IMPLEMENTING AGENCIES”) 4 * International Finance Institutions, ** Focus on infrastructure Source: External Assistance Orientation Document, April 2008 Sector prioritized for donor support by the government Donors Democratizat ion Civil Society Education Health Social protection Economic development Energy**Transport**Water Sanitation/ Environment Bilaterals Multilaterals (WB, EC) IFI* Total - 200763 EUR million 44 EUR million 69 EUR million 106 EUR million 42 EUR million 23 EUR million Covered by all or most actors Covered by some actors Covered by few actors Not covered UN budget 2008 (Pillar) 4.7 EUR million (Governance, Participation) 6.4 EUR million (Basic services) 2.3 EUR million (Regional development) 4.1 EUR million (Environ- ment)

6 CURRENT UN PROGRAMMING AND SECTOR FOCUS AREAS THE ONE UN PROGRAMME 5 PillarAgencies (convening agency in bold) Joint Programmes under this Pillar Budget 2008 1. GovernanceILO, UNDP, UNESCO, UNFPA, UNICEF, UNIFEM Gender Equality MDGF Youth Employment Migration Culture and Development Economic Governance 2.4 EUR million 2. ParticipationILO, UNDP, UNESCO, UNFPA, UNICEF, UNIFEM Gender Equality Vulnerable Minorities Communication 2.3 EUR million 3. Basic ServicesUNAIDS, UNDP, UNFPA, UNICEF, WHO Gender Equality HIV/AIDS 6.4 EUR million 4. Regional Development FAO, UNFPA, UNIFEM, UNDP Regional Development 2.3 EUR million 5. EnvironmentUNDP, UNEP, UNICEFEnvironment4.1 EUR million Cross cutting: National capacity development Cross cutting: Gender Source: One UN Programme Albania, AWP UN Albania 2008

7 CONTINUING DISCUSSION: VISION FOR THE UN IN ALBANIA IN 5-10 YEARS 6 Work together in groups to discuss the SWOT developed during the pre- workshop UNCT meeting Refine and specify the elements (e.g. define social inclusion) Add additional elements that you consider relevant After 20 min, discuss your results in the plenary Outcome Objectives Approach Refine SWOT analysis of the UN system in Albania developed at the pre- workshop UNCT Refined SWOT analysis that is specific enough to identify high-level future capacity requirements

8 SWOT: THE UN SYSTEM IN ALBANIA – NOVEMBER 2008 7 Opportunities: UN’s policy advice and technical experts will have to be present at different policy tables - e.g. on matters of legislation (legislation will be in place 3-5 y time) UNCT believes that social inclusion, together with democratic governance, are going to be at the forefront of UN’s work GEF and other environmental programmes will be paramount for the country as environment remains one of the most challenging components UN needs to enhance and improve understanding and opportunities of EU accession and UN should be ready to face needs for more capacity building efforts and take a bigger role than just to complement EU activities (e.g. in implementation and monitoring) UN can build on a great base of support: Albanian government and society show great respect for UN’ s mandate and work in the country Increase UN support in cross-boarder and regional co-operation programs Weaknesses: International organizations are losing influence to EU positions The UN seems to be lacking an holistic and comprehensive view to social inclusion, together with democratic governance The UN hasn’t focused on building relevant capacities for when Albania reaches EU candidate status Threats and Risks: Downsizing and limited resources – bilateral donors are closing or reducing programmes Tension between reducing staff in response to resource squeeze and maintaining presence at policy tables Lack of efficient systems and prioritization of work Gaps in the national legal framework which would call for different type of capacities from the UN Donor driven agenda and funding Reversal of enhanced UN coherence, effectiveness and efficiency (i.e. going back to business as usual with UN fragmented and spreading too thin) Reduction of government leadership and ownership of One UN Programme after elections Strengths: UN’s normative role is unique and will remain relevant in the future; the UN will be here longer than most other actors UN is well position to ensure national application of international commitments /principles and to support monitoring systems of these commitments (particularly on missions on non-discrimination and social inclusion) UN can offer an unrivalled global network of expertise which extends beyond the EU countries (e.g., on adaptation and mitigation for climate change) UN is a respected as a neutral broker between government and civil society UN is well paced to support stability and skills/capacity of civil administration UN’s role in social inclusion Workshop output

9 8 How to contribute Priority improvement areas for UN to work on Policy adviceTechnical assistance & training Network creation AdvocacyProgram & project manage- ment / operations Research / normative work / monitoring Strengthening government systems (incl. civil service stability, info sharing, etc.) Democratic governance (incl. strengthening civil society) Social inclusion (incl. adherence to int’l agreements) Environment (incl. climate change) Reducing informality VISION FOR UN IN ALBANIA IN 5-10 YEARS as seen by Heads of Agencies CentralImportantPart of workNot part of work Workshop output

10 AGENDA TimingSession 08.30 – 08.45Welcome and introduction (introduction by Gulden Turkoz-Cosslett) 08.45 – 10.15Setting expectations for future role and capacity of the UN in Albania (facilitation by GCMST) 10.15 – 10.30Coffee break 10.30 – 12.15Review of current capacity (presentation and facilitation by GCMST) 12.15 – 13.15Lunch 13.15 – 15.45Plan for the way forward (facilitation by GCMST) 15.45 – 16.00Coffee break 16.00 – 17.00Action plan and key messages for communications (facilitation by GCMST) 9

11 CAPACITY OF UN IN ALBANIA BROKEN DOWN BY “SUSTAINED”, “TARGETED” AND “NON-RESIDENT” number of full-time equivalents (FTEs), total = 211.9 FTEs Source: Job categorizations from HoAs, GCMST analysis and data validation “Sustained” refers to posts that are a sustained part of the UN country team, working on core functions and that can flexibly be allocated between activities because they are not contractually tied to individual projects. “Targeted” refer to posts created for specific projects or time-limited activities, which must be allocated to those projects and typically would not continue after the project comes to an end. “Targeted - A” / “B” posts are / are not available to help with general agency work (often because they are based in the agency’s / government ministry’s office). “Non-resident” includes mission and remote support from HQ and Regional Offices – this capacity is considered “sustained” because it is used regularly, although shown separately on this and subsequent charts. 10 211.90

12 CAPACITY BY UN ORGANISATION / UNIT breakdown by sustained, targeted, non-resident FTEs FTE = Full time equivalent, N=211.9 FTE Source: Job categorizations from HoAs, GCMST analysis and data validation 11 5.0 2.0 5.9 119.7 7.0 2.3 3.2 8.3 7.4 24.4 5.6 2.1 19.1

13 CAPACITY BY GRADE LEVEL percentages of total full-time equivalents (FTEs), total = 211.9 FTEs Source: Job categorizations from HoA, GCMST analysis and data validation Professionals and Consultants: 55% General Service: 45% 12 Internationally recruited National Officers General Staff UNVs Consultants and Others

14 CAPACITY BY GRADE LEVEL – TARGETED ‘B’s ONLY percentages of total full-time equivalents (FTEs), total = 88.3 Source: Job categorizations from HoAs, GCMST analysis and data validation 13 Professionals and Consultants: 57% General Service: 43% Internationally recruited National Officers General Staff UNVs Consultants and Others

15 14 NON-RESIDENT CAPACITY APPLIED TO ALBANIA FTEs UN organisation / unit Non resident capacity Total capacity* Non-resident capacity as % of total capacity* Out-of country capacity Missions (HQ and/or Regional) Total non- resident capacity DSS 05.000% FAO0.700.311.012.0150% ILO 0.460.450.915.8915% RCO 07.000% UNDP0.680.711.39119.691% UNEP1.360.461.822.3278% UNESCO1.590.632.223.2269% UNFPA0.050.250.38.304% UNHCR0.350.030.387.385% UNICEF0.140.220.3624.361% UNIFEM0.55 5.5510% UNV0.08 2.084% WHO 1.93 19.0810% Total 5.964.9910.95211.99 5% *Total capacity defined as the sum between resident capacity and non-resident capacity FTE = full-time equivalent Source: Job categorizations from HoAs, GCMST analysis and data validation Different use of non-resident capacity reflects different agency business models

16 15 CAPACITY MIX BETWEEN PROGRAMMES, OPERATIONS AND CROSS- CUTTING INTERVENTIONS breakdown by sustained, targeted, non-resident FTE = Full-time equivalent; N= 211.9 FTEs (including 2.4 FTEs not allocated ) Source: Job categorizations from HoAs, GCMST analysis and data validation Programmatic interventions occupy 43% of capacity; operational interventions 40% and cross-cutting interventions 17% 17% 43% 40%

17 CAPACITY BY INTERVENTION TYPE breakdown by sustained, targeted, non-resident Largest numbers of FTEs devoted to Advisory-TA, Programme Management, Advisory-Policy, Transport and Finance Cross-Cutting Interventions Operations Interventions Programmes Interventions FTE = Full-time equivalent; N= 211.9 FTEs (including 2.4 FTEs not allocated ) Source: Job categorizations from HoAs, GCMST analysis and data validation 16 Sustained Targeted - A Targeted - B Non-resident capacity

18 CAPACITY BY INTERVENTION TYPE FOR PROGRAMMES AND CROSS- CUTTING INTERVENTIONS breakdown by sustained, targeted, non-resident Advisory work uses most programmatic capacity overall, but majority of “sustained” programmatic capacity is for Programme Management FTE = Full-time equivalent N = 126.6 FTEs, excluding 2.4 FTEs not allocated Source: Job categorizations from HoAs, GCMST analysis and data validation 17

19 CAPACITY BY INTERVENTION TYPE FOR PROGRAMMES AND CROSS- CUTTING INTERVENTIONS breakdown by grade level FTE = Full-time equivalent N = 126.6 FTEs, excluding 2.4 FTEs not allocated Source: Job categorizations from HoAs, GCMST analysis and data validation 18

20 STAFF TIME ALLOCATION QUESTIONNAIRE SHOWS SOMEWHAT MORE PROGRAMME & PROJECT MANAGEMENT AND SOMEWHAT LESS ADVISORY WORK THAN THE CAPACITY ANALYSIS FROM HEADS OF AGENCIES includes only staff classified as ‘Programme’ staff Source: Job categorizations from HoAs, GCMST analysis and data validation N = 129 FTEs; Time allocation questionnaire, N = 77 responses 19 Differences could be due to two factors: - Differences in perceptions between HoAs and staff on the type of activities staff perform - Relatively low UNDP response rate, since UNDP respondents had a higher proportion of advisory functions and less programme management than other respondents

21 CAPACITY BY INTERVENTION TYPE FOR OPERATIONS INTERVENTIONS breakdown by sustained, targeted, non-resident FTE = Full-time equivalent N = 83 FTEs Source: Job categorizations from HoAs, GCMST analysis and data validation 20 Largest uses of overall operations capacity for Transport and Finance; more even division of “sustained” capacity across most operations areas

22 CAPACITY BY SUBJECT AREA CLUSTER excluding operations capacity; breakdown by sustained, targeted, non-resident 21 FTE = Full-time equivalent N = 147 FTEs excluding 65 FTEs with Subject area ‘Operations’ Source: Job categorizations from HoAs, GCMST analysis and data validation Capacity divided over many subject areas.

23 CAPACITY BY SUBJECT AREA excluding operations capacity; breakdown by sustained, targeted, non-resident 22 FTE = Full-time equivalent N = 147 FTEs excluding 65 FTEs with Subject area ‘Operations’ Source: Job categorizations from HoAs, GCMST analysis and data validation

24 CAPACITY BY SUBJECT AREA CLUSTER excluding operations capacity, breakdown by grade level FTE = Full-time equivalent N = 147 FTEs (excluding 65 Operations staff) Source: Job categorizations from HoAs, GCMST analysis and data validation 23 International capacity and all professional capacity spread over multiple areas.

25 CAPACITY BY SUBJECT AREA CLUSTER AND INTERVENTION TYPE breakdown by intervention types FTE = Full-time equivalent N = 212 FTEs Source: Job categorizations from HoAs, Dalberg analysis and data validation Note: Analysis based on the assumption that intervention types are spread across evenly for multiple subject areas of the same post 24 2 10 6 4 3 20 8 17 13 9 18 8 4 1 60 1 10 2 6 5 6 N Are these ratios acceptable? Should there be differences by subject area?

26 CAPACITY BY SUBJECT AREA CLUSTER – RATIO BETWEEN ADVISORY/ADVOCACY/RESEARCH TO PROGRAMME/PROJECT MANAGEMENT/DIRECT SERVICE breakdown by intervention types 25 N 2 7 1 3 2 9 4 11 9 4 12 5 3 1 1 8 1 3 2 Are these ratios acceptable? N = 90 FTEs Source: Job categorizations from HoAs, Dalberg analysis and data validation Note: Analysis based on the assumption that intervention types are spread across evenly for multiple subject areas of the same post

27 KEY QUESTIONS THAT WE HAVE LOOKED AT (1/2) 1.What capacities are needed – and what capacities are available – for agencies to reap the full benefits of working as a coherent and harmonized system in the country? 2.What capacities are needed – and what capacities are available – to deliver on the two core principles of the One UN Programme: development of national capacity and gender equality? 3.How much extra time & effort will One UN Programme and “Delivering as One” demand from people, and is it manageable with current resources? 4.How are Non Resident Agencies deploying capacity to execute activities for which they are responsible within the One UN Programme? 26 Illustrative example

28 KEY QUESTIONS THAT WE HAVE LOOKED AT (2/2) 5.What capacities are needed to ensure effective functioning of the Programme Working Groups? 6.What capacities are needed for overseeing and supporting delivery of the One Programme, including the M&E function, managing the "Delivering as One" change and continuing to enhance coordination in the UN system? Which of these capacities should be in the RCO and which in agencies, and how should they function? 7.What capacities are needed – in UNDP for its admin agent role and in other agencies – to administer the funds coming from the One Fund? 8.What increased capacities are needed in the Operations Management Team to implement/lead the harmonization of business practices? 27 Illustrative example

29 AGENDA TimingSession 08.30 – 08.45Welcome and introduction (introduction by Gulden Turkoz-Cosslett) 08.45 – 10.15Setting expectations for future role and capacity of the UN in Albania (facilitation by GCMST) 10.15 – 10.30Coffee break 10.30 – 12.15Review of current capacity (presentation and facilitation by GCMST) 12.15 – 13.15Lunch 13.15 – 15.45Plan for the way forward (facilitation by GCMST) 15.45 – 16.00Coffee break 16.00 – 17.00Action plan and key messages for communications (facilitation by GCMST) 28

30 29 How to contribute Priority improvement areas for UN to work on Policy advice Technical assistance & training Network creation AdvocacyProgram & project manage- ment / operations Research / normative work / monitoring Total Strengthening government systems (incl. civil service stability, info sharing, etc.) 2.32.80.22.10.1 7.4 Democratic governance (incl. strengthening civil society) 1.41.50.11.70.14.8 Social inclusion (incl. adherence to int’l agreements) 6.48.23.815.00.4 33.8 Environment (incl. climate change) 1.54.20.71.7 8.1 Reducing informality 0.70.80.10.7 2.2 Economic development (incl. agriculture) 3.79.70.54.80.0 18.7 Other (e.g., development policy, mine action, culture, etc.) 0.98.61.22.71.1 14.4 Total 16.835.56.628.71.7 89.4 VISION FOR UN IN ALBANIA IN 5-10 YEARS COMPARED WITH CURRENT CAPACITY CentralImportantPart of workNot part of work Note: Operations and cross-cutting FTEs not included in data presented in this chart (they amount to 122 FTEs) 2.3 Current programmatic capacity in FTEs Workshop output

31 AGENDA TimingSession 08.30 – 08.45Welcome and introduction (introduction by Gulden Turkoz-Cosslett) 08.45 – 10.15Setting expectations for future role and capacity of the UN in Albania (facilitation by GCMST) 10.15 – 10.30Coffee break 10.30 – 12.15Review of current capacity (presentation and facilitation by GCMST) 12.15 – 13.15Lunch 13.15 – 15.45Plan for the way forward (facilitation by GCMST) 15.45 – 16.00Coffee break 16.00 – 17.00Action plan and key messages for communications (facilitation by GCMST) 30


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