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4j Differentiation Workshop- Session 1 Presented by- Elizabeth Hynes, Raquel Gwynn, Kathy Luiten, Marlee Litten, and Kerri Sage.

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Presentation on theme: "4j Differentiation Workshop- Session 1 Presented by- Elizabeth Hynes, Raquel Gwynn, Kathy Luiten, Marlee Litten, and Kerri Sage."— Presentation transcript:

1 4j Differentiation Workshop- Session 1 Presented by- Elizabeth Hynes, Raquel Gwynn, Kathy Luiten, Marlee Litten, and Kerri Sage

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3 Goals for Today Receive an overview of the key components of differentiation Learn about pre-assessment, environment, and content as they apply to differentiated instruction Acquire tools to help with differentiation in the classroom Collaboration time with colleagues

4 Norms for Collaborative Work Equity of Voice Active Listening Safety to Share Different Perspectives

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6 Are you ready for blast off?

7 “To get through the hardest journey we need take only one step at a time, but we must keep on stepping” Chinese Proverb

8 Differentiated Instruction What we call differentiation is not a recipe for teaching. It is not an instructional strategy. It is not what a teacher does when he or she has time. It is a way of thinking about teaching and learning. It is a philosophy. -Carol Ann Tomlinson

9 What is Differentiation? Differentiation can be defined as a way of teaching in which teachers proactively modify curriculum, teaching methods, resources, learning activities, and student products to address the needs of individual students and/or small groups of students to maximize the learning opportunity for each student in the classroom. Differentiation is a way of thinking about teaching and learning that seeks to recognize, learn about, and address the particular learning needs of each student. To that end, teachers use varied approaches to curriculum, instruction, and assessment. Differentiation adapts what we teach, how we teach, how students learn, and how students show what they have learned based on the readiness levels, interests, and preferred learning modes of students. Tomlinson, C.; Brighton, C; Brimijoin, K.; Callahan, C.; Hertberg, H.; Moon, T.; Canover, L.; Reynolds, T. (2003). Differentiating instruction in response to student readiness, interest, and learning profile in academically diverse classrooms: A review of literature. Journal for the Education of the Gifted, 27 (2/3), pp

10 Table Activity Highlight key words or phrases that resonate with you Share out

11 Why Differentiate? The number of English Language Learners in classrooms across the country is increasing. (Center for Immigration Studies, 2001). English Language learners face the daunting task of mastering complex subject matter even as they learn a new language. The achievement gap for minority learners continues in schools across the country. (Haycock, 2001) Closing the achievement gap and increasing student achievement are a major goals of most school districts in our state. Special education has moved steadily toward the goal of inclusive instruction for many students with disabilities. (U.S. Department of Education, 2006). This is based on the premise that ALL students are an important part of general education, both benefiting and benefitting from interactions with a wide variety of learners. Our brightest students may be losing academic and motivational ground in classrooms ill-equipped to ensure that they, like other students, are expected to progress at least a year’s worth in an academic year. (Callahan, et al., 2000) Video (Susan Bray)

12 Overview of the Impact of Differentiation

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14 What is the readiness level of my students? Where are they starting from?

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16 Smart Goal S- specific, significant, stretching M- measurable, meaningful, motivational A- agreed upon, attainable, achievable, acceptable R- relevant, realistic, reasonable, rewarding, results T- timely, time-based, tangible, trackable

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18 Pre-Assessment Unless a teacher uses some form of pre- assessment to make decisions about instruction, students’ levels of readiness, interest, and learning profiles will remain untapped. - Carol Ann Tomlinson

19 How is pre-assessment different from other assessments? Summative Assessments- Assessments OF learning Formative Assessments- Assessments FOR learning Pre-assessments- Assessments directing us where to start

20 Types and Frequency of Pre-assessments Readiness- Prior to introduction of a new skill set or unit Interest- One time, usually beginning of the year Learning Profile- One time, usually beginning of the year Affect- One time, usually beginning of the year

21 Readiness Readiness vs. Ability Readiness levels vary over time, topic, and circumstance Zone of proximal development Student self efficacy General cognitive proficiency Prior learning and life experiences Attitudes about school Habits of mind Readiness is influenced by: A student’s knowledge, understanding, and skill related to a particular sequence of learning. (Tomlinson, 2003)

22 Learning Profile The ways in which we learn best as individuals Learning-Style preferences Intelligence Preferences Culture-Influenced Preferences Gender-Based Preferences The Categories of Learning Profile Factors :

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24 Interest By drawing on existing student interest: Teachers help students realize that there is a match between school and their own desire to learn. Teachers demonstrate the connectedness between all learning Teachers use skills or ideas familiar to students as a bridge to ideas or skills less familiar to them Teachers enhance student motivation

25 Affect Students emotions and feelings How students feel about themselves, their work, and the classroom as a whole Positive affect is more likely to support student learning than negative or neutral affect. (Given, 2002; Wolfe, 2001) “All children can learn” does not mean “all children learn the same.” Furthermore, diversity is not merely about external characteristics. If we’re really going to take this seriously, that means we start looking at diversity on the inside as well as diversity on the outside. -Donald Reeves

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27 Pre-assessment Example- 5 Point Scale (Interest, Learning Profile, and Affect)

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29 Rate Yourself going to the mall teaching art teaching math driving in the snow getting up in the morning hearing an argument riding on a plane bright lights not having enough time having a schedule change attending a district training the IIPM model listening to music time with your family being observed

30 Compare Results At your table discuss- What did you have in common? What was different? Think how this might also be true for your class How might you use this in your class? What might you ask them to rate?

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34 Using Pre- assessments to build a differentiated class environment

35 Components of a Class Environment Physical and visual Furniture, materials, sensory, wall space, etc. Routines and expectations Opening, large group, small group, etc. Atmosphere Safe, inviting, active learning, respect, etc.

36 How might you use information from pre-assessments to create a differentiated environment?

37 Activity- Building a differentiated class environment Find your sample class (Class A, B, or C) Gather materials- poster paper, felt pens, etc. Overview of activity

38 Activity- Part 1 Physical/Visual Look at your class description Draw a physical layout of the room Furniture and wall items List materials you would have available

39 Activity- Part 2 Routines/Expectations List or create examples of specific routines you would establish in your class List class expectations (may have more than one set based upon activities) that would help support a differentiated classroom

40 Activity- Part 3 Atmosphere Describe what someone would see when they visited your classroom that would show evidence of: safety, respect, learning, and inclusion of all students

41 Followed by our Gallery Walk and debrief of the activity BREAK

42 Gallery Walk Guidelines Take some post-its and a writing utensil with you Post comments on displays regarding- Observed connections to class needs Questions or clarity needed Creative ideas that meet student needs

43 Pre-assessment of Readiness

44 Readiness Readiness vs. Ability Readiness levels vary over time, topic, and circumstance Zone of proximal development Student self efficacy General cognitive proficiency Prior learning and life experiences Attitudes about school Habits of mind Readiness is influenced by: A student’s knowledge, understanding, and skill related to a particular sequence of learning. (Tomlinson, 2003)

45 What information do we already have? EasyCBM benchmark data Weekly/Unit assessments from the core OAKS Teacher observation and work samples

46 OAKS EasyCBM Benchmark Pre-Assessment Unit Test State District Grade Level Classroo m Individual Weekly Test

47 Examples of Pre-assessment for Readiness Entry/Exit Cards Quick Response Walk arounds or observational notes White boards Walk through your Tool Kit

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49 Pre-assessing Readiness Know where you want students to be (clear goals) Begin where they are Don’t assume that they are low in all areas if they are low in one area Keep groupings flexible

50 Sample Goal/Standard: Goal: To find the perimeter of two-dimensional shapes 3rd gr. Math 3.3- Determine and analyze properties of two- dimensional shapes, including perimeter What are the nouns? Properties, two-dimensional shapes, perimeter They tell us what concepts they need to know What are the verbs? Describe, analyze They tell us what skills they need to do What are the verbs? Describe, analyze They tell us what skills they need to do

51 Smart Goal S- specific, significant, stretching M- measurable, meaningful, motivational A- agreed upon, attainable, achievable, acceptable R- relevant, realistic, reasonable, rewarding, results T- timely, time-based, tangible, trackable

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53 Homework Identify a goal and the supporting standard that you will teach Pre-assess for readiness Group students based upon results Write a brief description of each level based upon a sample student

54 A differentiated start, based upon assessment of the standards + Differentiated goals based upon student growth and the standards + The use of research based instructional strategies in instruction of the skills =

55 STUDENT SUCCESS

56 Animal school video

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