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Virginia Alternate Assessment Program VAAP Writing Virginia Department of Education Revised Summer 2014 VAAP Writing Virginia Department of Education Revised.

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Presentation on theme: "Virginia Alternate Assessment Program VAAP Writing Virginia Department of Education Revised Summer 2014 VAAP Writing Virginia Department of Education Revised."— Presentation transcript:

1 Virginia Alternate Assessment Program VAAP Writing Virginia Department of Education Revised Summer 2014 VAAP Writing Virginia Department of Education Revised Summer 2014

2 Topics Changes to VAAP Writing Writing Aligned Standards of Learning (ASOL) Levels of Performance Writing Samples and Activities Writing Resources Case Study Q and A Changes to VAAP Writing Writing Aligned Standards of Learning (ASOL) Levels of Performance Writing Samples and Activities Writing Resources Case Study Q and A 2

3 In , changes to the VAAP affected... ReadingWriting ScienceMathematics 3

4 Writing ASOL New Writing ASOL were implemented in the school year. These Writing ASOL were drawn from the Dynamic Learning Map (DLM) project and are Essential Elements that have been developed and linked to Virginia’s Standards of Learning. New Writing ASOL were implemented in the school year. These Writing ASOL were drawn from the Dynamic Learning Map (DLM) project and are Essential Elements that have been developed and linked to Virginia’s Standards of Learning. 4

5 Selection of ASOL Determining the correct grade of enrollment for all VAAP writing participants is crucial because: Teachers must select Writing ASOL listed at the student’s grade of enrollment. Writing is assessed at grade 8 and High School Teachers must select ASOL from each of the two reporting categories E-WP and E-WE Determining the correct grade of enrollment for all VAAP writing participants is crucial because: Teachers must select Writing ASOL listed at the student’s grade of enrollment. Writing is assessed at grade 8 and High School Teachers must select ASOL from each of the two reporting categories E-WP and E-WE 5

6 Writing ASOL Summary Matrix Based on the 2010 English Standards of Learning Reporting Category Grade 8High School Research, plan, compose, and revise for a variety of purposes (E-WP) 8E-WP 1 8E-WP 2 8E-WP 3 8E-WP 4 8E-WP 5 8E-WP 6 HSE-WP 1 HSE-WP 2 HSE-WP 3 HSE-WP 4 HSE-WP 5 HSE-WP 6 Edit for correct use of language, capitalization, punctuation, and spelling (E- WE) 8E-WE 1 8E-WE 2 8E-WE 3 HSE-WE 1 HSE-WE 2 HSE-WE 3 HSE-WE 4 6

7 Example – Middle School 8 E-WE 1a 8 E-WE 1a 7 Grade 8 English (Writing) ASOL 1 Editing Bullet a The student will use standard English rules when writing by using question marks at the end of written questions.

8 Levels of Performance Teachers must determine the student’s level of performance for the Writing ASOL. Levels of Performance provide flexibility for instruction and assessment. Teachers must determine the student’s level of performance for the Writing ASOL. Levels of Performance provide flexibility for instruction and assessment. 8

9 Levels of Performance Level I: The ASOL is demonstrated with significant support and modification. Level II: The ASOL is partially demonstrated. Level III: The ASOL is fully demonstrated. Level I: The ASOL is demonstrated with significant support and modification. Level II: The ASOL is partially demonstrated. Level III: The ASOL is fully demonstrated. 9

10 Levels of Performance Level I: The student requires significant support and modification to simplify the task in order to demonstrate the ASOL. The rigor of the ASOL has been reduced to the basic skills necessary to achieve understanding (e.g., writing letters instead of words). Level I: The student requires significant support and modification to simplify the task in order to demonstrate the ASOL. The rigor of the ASOL has been reduced to the basic skills necessary to achieve understanding (e.g., writing letters instead of words). 10

11 Levels of Performance Level II: The student partially demonstrates the ASOL. The student is able to demonstrate understanding of a part of the ASOL in which rigor has been decreased through a reduction in the number of skills, concepts, tools, type of text, or a change in the depth of knowledge (e.g. applying ending punctuation to 3 out of 5 sentences written ). Level II: The student partially demonstrates the ASOL. The student is able to demonstrate understanding of a part of the ASOL in which rigor has been decreased through a reduction in the number of skills, concepts, tools, type of text, or a change in the depth of knowledge (e.g. applying ending punctuation to 3 out of 5 sentences written ). 11

12 Levels of Performance Level III: The student fully demonstrates the ASOL. The student fully demonstrates the knowledge and skill of the ASOL. Level III: The student fully demonstrates the ASOL. The student fully demonstrates the knowledge and skill of the ASOL. 12

13 Determining Levels of Performance Is my student able to demonstrate the full ASOL? Are there specific components of the ASOL for which my student can demonstrate understanding? Are significant supports and modifications needed to assist my student in demonstrating the ASOL? Is my student able to demonstrate the full ASOL? Are there specific components of the ASOL for which my student can demonstrate understanding? Are significant supports and modifications needed to assist my student in demonstrating the ASOL? 13

14 Determining the Level of Performance Use: IEP (Present Level of Performance, Evaluation Results Teacher observations Use: IEP (Present Level of Performance, Evaluation Results Teacher observations Use Classroom data to determine: Student’s strengths and weakness relative to the ASOL selected Accommodations needed Supports needed 14

15 Determining the Level of Performance Approach 1 Select an ASOL and provide instruction at Level III ( ASOL fully demonstrated). Collect evidence throughout the school year. Review the evidence prior to submission and adjust the level on the Student Evidence Identification (SEI) Tag based on the performance of the student. Level may be Level III or a lower level. Approach 1 Select an ASOL and provide instruction at Level III ( ASOL fully demonstrated). Collect evidence throughout the school year. Review the evidence prior to submission and adjust the level on the Student Evidence Identification (SEI) Tag based on the performance of the student. Level may be Level III or a lower level. Approach 2 Select an ASOL and determine the level best suited to the student’s strengths and weaknesses based on data. Provide instruction based on the level selected for the ASOL. Collect evidence throughout the school year. Review the evidence prior to submission and adjust the level on the SEI tag based on the performance of the student. Level may be as originally determined or may change. 15

16 Writing

17 What is writing? Essential component of literacy instruction Reading is not a prerequisite for writing Writing does not have to use typical paper pencil tasks… Skill development from emergent to conventional writing Essential component of literacy instruction Reading is not a prerequisite for writing Writing does not have to use typical paper pencil tasks… Skill development from emergent to conventional writing 17

18 VAAP Scoring Rubric ScoreDescriptors 0There is no evidence of the specific ASOL being addressed. 1There is little evidence that the student has demonstrated the skills and knowledge stated in the ASOL being addressed. 2There is some evidence that the student has demonstrated the skills and knowledge stated in the ASOL being addressed. 3There is adequate evidence that the student has demonstrated the skills and knowledge stated in the ASOL being addressed. 4There is ample evidence that the student has demonstrated the skills and knowledge stated in the ASOL being addressed.

19 Scoring Considerations Level I: The evidence is demonstrated with significant support and modification of the ASOL. The highest score point evidence at level 1 may be assigned is a “2.” Level II: The evidence partially demonstrates the ASOL. The highest score point evidence at level 2 may be assigned is a “3.” Level III: The evidence fully demonstrates the ASOL. The highest score point evidence at level 3 may be assigned is a “4.” Level I: The evidence is demonstrated with significant support and modification of the ASOL. The highest score point evidence at level 1 may be assigned is a “2.” Level II: The evidence partially demonstrates the ASOL. The highest score point evidence at level 2 may be assigned is a “3.” Level III: The evidence fully demonstrates the ASOL. The highest score point evidence at level 3 may be assigned is a “4.” 19

20 WRITING EXAMPLES Activity 20

21 Writing ASOL Grade 8 Example 8E-WP 1a The student will a) write to convey ideas and information including facts, details and other information; The student will a) write to convey ideas and information including facts, details and other information; 21

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23 Writing ASOL Grade 8 Example 8E-WP 1a Not conveying ideas Does have facts Does have details and other information Level II ? Not conveying ideas Does have facts Does have details and other information Level II ? 23

24 Writing ASOL High School Example HSE-WE 4a The student will a) edit writing for grammatically correct use of language, spelling, punctuation, capitalization, and sentence/paragraph structure. The student will a) edit writing for grammatically correct use of language, spelling, punctuation, capitalization, and sentence/paragraph structure. 24

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27 Writing ASOL High School Example HSE-WE 4a Edit writing Punctuation Capitalization What about ? Language Spelling Sentence/Paragraph Structure Level II? Edit writing Punctuation Capitalization What about ? Language Spelling Sentence/Paragraph Structure Level II? 27

28 Writing Resources What can we use? Assistive Technology Physical Environment Design Alternative Pencils 28

29 Assistive Technology Hi Tech and Lo Tech Options Onscreen keyboards PECS books and visuals Natural aided language (picture placemats) Picture point communication board system Topic ring/topic wallet SMART Boards Use of iPad, iPod, iTouch Hi Tech and Lo Tech Options Onscreen keyboards PECS books and visuals Natural aided language (picture placemats) Picture point communication board system Topic ring/topic wallet SMART Boards Use of iPad, iPod, iTouch 29

30 Physical Environment Flip charts IntelliKey overlays Switches (Big MAC, etc.) Desktop accessories Eye gaze frames Writing utensil alternatives Flip charts IntelliKey overlays Switches (Big MAC, etc.) Desktop accessories Eye gaze frames Writing utensil alternatives 30

31 Alternative Pencils Training and Technical Assistance Centers (TTAC) Writing with Alternative Pencils CD Activities Training opportunities Training and Technical Assistance Centers (TTAC) Writing with Alternative Pencils CD Activities Training opportunities 31

32 DESIGN A LESSON Activity 32

33 Grade 8 Writing ASOL 8E-WP 1c The student will c) plan by brainstorming and revise own writing by adding more information. Think-Pair-Share The student will c) plan by brainstorming and revise own writing by adding more information. Think-Pair-Share 33

34 Considerations How would you demonstrate? What about levels of performance? How could you utilize general education peers in development? How could you approach this as a group activity while having each student individually complete work for the assessment? How would you demonstrate? What about levels of performance? How could you utilize general education peers in development? How could you approach this as a group activity while having each student individually complete work for the assessment? 34

35 FIND THE ACCOMMODATION Activity 35

36 Using your previous lesson Examples of AT for planning and brainstorming topics? Revising writing to add more information to writing sample? Examples of AT for planning and brainstorming topics? Revising writing to add more information to writing sample? 36

37 Considerations What are examples of lo and hi tech options? What about students with physical limitations? What are examples of lo and hi tech options? What about students with physical limitations? 37

38 Jake Case Study Journal Writing with the Alphabet Flip Chart /clds/projects/north- carolina-deaf-blind- project/db-case- studies/jakes-story-1/jakes- story Journal Writing with the Alphabet Flip Chart /clds/projects/north- carolina-deaf-blind- project/db-case- studies/jakes-story-1/jakes- story 38

39 Jake Case Study Jake used his knee picker switch to highlight the Big Mac switch for his partner to select. The flip chart contained letters as well as simple editing commands (space, new word and delete). Topics were selected using his remnant book, which was of very high interest for Jake. Jake used his knee picker switch to highlight the Big Mac switch for his partner to select. The flip chart contained letters as well as simple editing commands (space, new word and delete). Topics were selected using his remnant book, which was of very high interest for Jake. 39

40 Additional Resources Examples of levels for Reading, Writing, Mathematics and Science Sample activities for teachers Support materials and resources for implementation Curriculum Framework TTAC Online Examples of levels for Reading, Writing, Mathematics and Science Sample activities for teachers Support materials and resources for implementation Curriculum Framework TTAC Online 40

41 Tips for Teachers Make sure evidence is demonstrating the ASOL completely Anecdotal record narrative and captions for photographs should give a thorough explanation of what the student is doing Correctly grade pieces of evidence and complete SEI tags Make sure evidence is demonstrating the ASOL completely Anecdotal record narrative and captions for photographs should give a thorough explanation of what the student is doing Correctly grade pieces of evidence and complete SEI tags 41

42 Making it Work in the Classroom Collaboration and consultation with general education teachers Co-teaching with general education teachers and related service providers Use of Assistive Technology Thematic units to incorporate writing with other content areas Collaboration and consultation with general education teachers Co-teaching with general education teachers and related service providers Use of Assistive Technology Thematic units to incorporate writing with other content areas 42

43 Online Writing Resources UNC Center for Literacy and Disability Studies Literacy for Children with Combined Vision and Hearing Loss UNC Center for Literacy and Disability Studies Literacy for Children with Combined Vision and Hearing Loss 43

44 Online AT Writing Resources VDOE Assistive Technology Website _svcs/assistive_technology/index.shtml VDOE Assistive Technology Framework Document svcs/assistive_technology / VDOE Assistive Technology Website _svcs/assistive_technology/index.shtml VDOE Assistive Technology Framework Document svcs/assistive_technology / 44

45 Online AT Writing Resources VDOE TTAC Assistive Technology State Directed Project Website TTAC Online VAAP Resources VDOE TTAC Assistive Technology State Directed Project Website TTAC Online VAAP Resources 45

46 Writing Q and A Q: What if my student can’t write with a pencil? A: The use of accommodations through a scribe and the use of instructional tools such as alternative pencils can help students to access writing on a variety of levels. Q: What if my student can’t write with a pencil? A: The use of accommodations through a scribe and the use of instructional tools such as alternative pencils can help students to access writing on a variety of levels. 46

47 Writing Q and A Q: How can my student in 9 th grade with significant disabilities be expected to work on high school ASOL? A: Instruction throughout the year should meet the student at their present level and work to develop specific skills. The performance levels can be used to give additional flexibility for the requirements of the ASOL. Q: How can my student in 9 th grade with significant disabilities be expected to work on high school ASOL? A: Instruction throughout the year should meet the student at their present level and work to develop specific skills. The performance levels can be used to give additional flexibility for the requirements of the ASOL. 47

48 QUESTIONS Virginia Department of Education Division of Special Education and Student Services (804) Division of Student Assessment and School Improvement (804) Virginia Department of Education Division of Special Education and Student Services (804) Division of Student Assessment and School Improvement (804)


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