Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Prepared for the History and Social Science Professional Learning Community of the Virginia School-University Partnership by Dan Mulligan, Ed. D. February.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Prepared for the History and Social Science Professional Learning Community of the Virginia School-University Partnership by Dan Mulligan, Ed. D. February."— Presentation transcript:

1 Prepared for the History and Social Science Professional Learning Community of the Virginia School-University Partnership by Dan Mulligan, Ed. D. February 2011 THINKING GOES TO SCHOOL Research Strategies that Produce Positive Results

2 Personal Learning Goals I will I will recognize the new emphasis on content in the new History & Social Science SOL; I will I will understand the new emphasis on vocabulary contained in the new History & Social Science SOL; I will I will identify the new emphasis on skills embedded in the new History & Social Science SOL; I will I will create learning environments that both build background knowledge and foster reasoning and critical thinking; and I will ! I will enjoy working with my colleagues!

3 “Seven Survival Skills for the New Economy” ~Tony Wagner, The Global Achievement Gap 1. Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving 2. Collaboration across Networks and Leading by Influence 3. Agility and Adaptability 4. Initiative and Entrepreneurialism 5. Effective Oral and Written Communication 6. Accessing and Analyzing Information 7. Curiosity and Imagination “Rigor” is using academic knowledge to create new knowledge/ content and to solve real problems. “Engagement” begins with the MIND, not with the HANDS (that is a very loose paraphrase) — activities & action do not equal “rigor”

4

5 MOVING from ETCH-a SKETCH Learning to Each STUDENT UNDERSTANDING Don’t let the ‘what’ overshadow the ‘how!’

6 page 2

7

8 Opportunity to Learn rric Three types of curricula were identified: The Intended Curriculum: content/skill specified by the state, division, or school at a particular grade level. The Implemented Curriculum: content/skill actually delivered by the teacher. The Attained Curriculum: content/skill actually learned by the students. Intended Curriculum Implemented Curriculum Attained Curriculum Has the strongest relationship with student achievement of all school-level factors. What Works in Schools, ASCD

9 Content-Related Evidence of Validity (Intended Curriculum) Essential Skills Essential Knowledge Essential Vocabulary Learning TARGET (content validity)

10 Essential Vocabulary Explain the meaning of totalitarianism. Essential Knowledge What factors led to the Holocaust? Essential Skills Compare the genocide of the Armenians and the Tutsis.

11

12 There are three parts to any research-based lesson: Beginning – ‘check for’ and ‘build’ background knowledge of each student; (BL) During – teach and actively engage each student in new content – making connections to prior knowledge; (DL) End – check for understanding - provide each student with an opportunity to summarize (in their own way) and practice the essential knowledge and skills conveyed in the lesson. (EL)

13 SAMPLE Pre-assessment that includes differentiation SAMPLE Pre-assessment that includes differentiation democracy PAGE 16

14

15 Mix it Up in the Box Listen for the topic and the amount of time; Silently mix around the room; When directed, pair up with person closest to you; In pairs, Partner A shares and Partner B listens; Partner B responds to what he/she heard by paraphrasing: “LET ME TELL YOU WHAT I UNDERSTOOD YOU TO SAY”; Record summary of partners response; then Switch Roles

16 123 What is an action taken by you, your grade-level/department or your school that you attribute to resulting in increased understanding of history for each student impacted by the action last year? Describe the process currently used to adjust classroom assessments for the new history SOL? What do people ‘do’ with the results? Look at the picture above. How does this picture relate to your role as a teacher of history? Complete this sentence: The image is like my teaching in that_______

17 123 What is an action taken by you, your grade-level/department or your school that you attribute to resulting in increased understanding of history for each student impacted by the action last year? Describe the process currently used to create classroom assessments for the new history SOL? What do people ‘do’ with the results? Look at the picture above. How does this picture relate to your role as a teacher of history? Complete this sentence: The image is like my teaching in that_______

18 Principle #1 Grounding the Workshop: “Never say anything to a student they can say themselves.”

19 “If you don’t know where you are and you don’t know where you are going, anything you do will get you there”

20 Record your responses on the smaller Post-it Notes and in a team list…

21 1.The % of ALL students scoring Advanced on the Civics and Economics tests in The % of PovertyAdvanced on the Civics and Economics tests in The % of Poverty students scoring Advanced on the Civics and Economics tests in Advanced on the Civics and Economics tests in The % of SWD scoring Advanced on the Civics and Economics tests in According to the Silent Epidemic, the % of U.S. dropouts who felt they were ‘too far behind’ by the end of elementary school. ALL students Advanced on the VA & US History tests in The % of ALL students Advanced on the VA & US History tests in The % of Poverty students Advanced on the VA & US History tests in Advanced on the VA & US History tests in The % of SWD students Advanced on the VA & US History tests in In Virginia’s Public Schools: SOLUTIONS: 15, 18, 19, 23, 35, 41, 51 18

22 123 What is an action taken by you, your grade-level/department or your school that you attribute to resulting in increased understanding of history for each student impacted by the action last year? Look at the picture above. How does this picture relate to your role as a teacher of history? Complete this sentence: The image is like my teaching in that_______ Describe the process currently used to adjust classroom assessments for the new history SOL? What do people ‘do’ with the results?

23 When students know what they are learning, their performance, on average, has been shown to be 27 percentile points higher than students who do not know what they are learning.

24 Organizing Student Thinking

25

26

27 Category Ave. Effect Size (ES) Percentile Gain Identify similarities & differences Summarizing & note taking Reinforcing effort & providing recognition.8029 Homework & practice.7728 Nonlinguistic representations.7527 Cooperative learning.7327 *Setting objectives & providing feedback*.6123 Generating & testing hypotheses.6123 Questions, cues, & advance organizers.5922

28 Building Academic Vocabulary Knowledge of important terms is critical to understanding any subject. The more terms a person knows about a subject, the easier it is to understand – and learn – new information related to that subject.

29 Find a new friend in the room. Introduce yourself and share what you ‘do’. Find 2 comfortable seats and relax.

30 WHY ACADEMIC VOCABULARY? Find another 4-second partner Find another 4-second partner  Tell them who you are and one summer joy;  Find 2 seats. Tell a chain story about the process of photosynthesis… Tell a chain story about the process of photosynthesis… …without using words that begin with: …without using words that begin with: P, L, T, S

31 A Six-Step Process for Teaching New Terms 1: Provide a description, explanation, or example of the new term; 2: Ask students to restate the description, explanation, or example in their own words; 3: Ask students to construct a picture, symbol, or graphic representing the term or phrase; 4: Engage students periodically in activities that will help them add to their knowledge of the terms in their notebooks; 5: Periodically ask students to discuss the terms with one another; and 6: Involve students periodically in games that allow them to play with terms.

32 Research on Imagery as Elaboration 6 37 percentile pts. higher than… …students who kept repeating definitions percentile pts. higher than… …students who were using the terms in a sentence. Students who used imagery to learn vocabulary, on average, performed # of studies

33 50 POINTS50 POINTS50 POINTS 100 POINTS 200 POINTS Sara Palin Organizing Theme: Things someone would say… Hillary Clinton Michelle ObamaMark Zuckerburg The Chilean Coal Miners The Queen of England FAMOUS PEOPLE OF 2010 EDITION

34 50 POINTS50 POINTS50 POINTS 100 POINTS 200 POINTS ORGANIZED LABORCIVIL LIBERTIES TENEMENTSDISCRIMINATION NATIONALISM IMMIGRATION U.S. History: 1865 to Present

35 Great Sites for Images

36 Elementary Resources: Students, Parents Our Schools: Greene County Primary Secondary Resources: Instruction Curriculum Resources Dan Mulligan

37 50 POINTS50 POINTS50 POINTS 100 POINTS 200 POINTS

38

39

40 Page 19 Page 19

41

42

43 Summarizing and Note Taking Approaches to this strategy in the classroom: –Teaching students the rule-based summarizing strategies, –Using summary frames, and –Teaching students reciprocal teaching and group- enhanced summary. What does it look like? –Take out material that is NOT important for understanding, –Take out words that repeat information, –Replace a list of things with a word that describes the things in the list (e.g., use trees for elm, oak, and maple). –Find a topic sentence. If you cannot find a topic sentence, make one up.

44 Summarizing and Note Taking Generalizations form the research: –Verbatim note-taking is, perhaps, the least effective technique. –Notes should be considered a work in progress. –Notes should be used as a study guide for tests. –The more notes that are taken, the better.

45 Instructional Strategies that Facilitate Successful Inclusion Must … Supply students with STRUCTURE and ORGANIZATION Encourage student COMMUNICATION and COLLABORATION Provide students with VISUAL and HANDS-ON learning experiences

46 C O V E R C O V E R Allow students to personalize their notebook with a cover collage. Preserve with packing tape.

47 Table of Content Samples

48

49 MIND Notebook Rubric

50

51 Essential Components of the History and Social Science SOL

52

53

54

55 1.Remember it. (Describe its colors, shapes, and sizes. What does it look like?) 2.Understand it. (What does it make you think of?) 3.Apply it. (What can you do with it? How is it used?) 4.Analyze it. (How is it made or what is it composed of?) 5.Evaluate it. (Take a stand and list reasons for supporting it.) 6.Create it. (Generate a new version of it. How is it an improvement from the original?) CUBING 2010

56 Virginia SOL Verbs PROBLEM SOLVING AnalyzeDeriveDiscoverEvaluateExplore PredictSolveSurveyVerifyInvestigate REASONING CategorizeClassifyCompareContrastDifferentiate DescribeEstimateExplainGeneralizeInterpret JustifyOrderHypothesizePredictInfer PrioritizeRankValidateSummarize COMMUNICATION ClarifyCorrespondDescribeDiscussDemonstrate ExhibitExplainExpressPersuadePortray RestateShowSpeakStateWrite

57

58 KEY QUESTION: Why are common assessments so important? “You can enhance or destroy students’ desire to succeed in school more quickly and permanently through your use of assessment than with any other tools you have at your disposal.” Rick Stiggins, Assessment Trainers Institute WHY do we ASSESS: 1. INFORM INSTRUCTIONAL DECISIONS 2. ENCOURAGE STUDENTS TO TRY

59 Talk to Me… Directions – –Form a team of EIGHT (8) people… – –Determine the person with the most sisters and then send them to pick-up your team ziplock bag… PLEASE DO NOT OPEN!!! – –Determine the person with the least sisters and send them to pick-up a grid sheet for each person. – –Distribute a grid sheet to each team member.

60

61 Follow-up Debriefing Each pair should share with your other team members the method you used to graph the figure. Discuss with your team: –Which method appeals to you? –Is there another method that you would prefer? Prepare for a “pairs choice of method” with a new graph.

62

63 Key Question Did your performance on the second attempt to complete the grid exercise improve after having an opportunity to self-assess your initial strategy?

64 Formative Assessment Formative assessment is the process used by teachers and students during instruction that provides feedback to adjust teaching and learning for the purpose of improving student learning. Council of Chief State School Officers, October 2006 Notes: Process rather than a particular test…. It is not the nature of the test itself that makes it formative or summative…it is the use to which those results will be put.

65 Thank you for your commitment to children! "It's your attitude, not just your aptitude that determines your ultimate altitude." -- Zig Ziglar Dan e4ae.com

66 BLIND SEQUENCING

67 CategoryAve. Effect Size (ES) Percentile Gain Identify similarities & differences Summarizing & note taking Reinforcing effort & providing recognition.8029 Homework & practice.7728 Nonlinguistic representations.7527 Cooperative learning.7327 Setting objectives & providing feedback.6123 Generating & testing hypotheses.6123 Questions, cues, & advance organizers.5922 HIGH-Yield Instructional Strategies

68 Effective Instruction # 1: consistently uses Effective Instruction # 1: consistently uses collaborative learning Group WorkCollaborative LearningLooks Like Each student has the same information as every other team member. Each student has unique information necessary for the team to compete the task. I know that George Washington was a brave leader of soldiers. Each student has the same role as every other team member. Each student has a unique role in the group. My task is to lead the group map that will illustrate the location of major events in George Washington’s life. Jigsaw is not needed since each team member can work independent of others and still accomplish the task. Jigsaw can be used to build student understanding of their unique role in the group. During the activity, I will meet with the member from each group that shares my role of mapmaker and we will discuss strategies. Students develop own understandings and solutions. Students work jointly to develop understandings and solutions. Turn to your neighbor and decide what is the most important contribution of George Washington.

69

70

71 Reflect on Your Strengths and Opportunities to Improve When Working With Others

72

73 Principle #1 Grounding the Workshop: “Never say anything to a student they can say themselves.”

74 Category Ave. Effect Size (ES) Percentile Gain Identify similarities & differences Summarizing & note taking Reinforcing effort & providing recognition.8029 Homework & practice.7728 Nonlinguistic representations.7527 Cooperative learning.7327 *Setting objectives & providing feedback*.6123 Generating & testing hypotheses.6123 Questions, cues, & advance organizers.5922

75 Knowing the Learner Directions: Rank the symbols (1-4) in order from most (1) like you as a learner to least (4) like you as a learner.

76 Knowing the Learner Learning Style of Beach Balls

77 Knowing the Learner Learning Style of Microscopes

78 Knowing the Learner Learning Style of Clipboards

79 Knowing the Learner Learning Style of Puppies

80 “If an educator keeps using the same strategies over and over and the student keeps failing, who really is the slow learner?”

81 Musical/Rhythmic Sing it Create a beat Rap it Make a cheer Create a jingle Hum it Identify sounds React to sounds Listen to sounds Connect to music Write a poemVerbal/Linguistic Read it Spell it Write it Listen to it Tell it Recall it Use “you” words Apply it Chunk information Say it Use mnemonicsLogical/Mathematical Make a pattern Chart it Sequence it Create a mnemonic Analyze it Think abstractly Think critically Use numbers Prove it Interpret the data Use the statisticsVisual/Spatial Mind maps Graphic organizers Video Color code Highlight Shape a word Interpret a graphic Read a chart Study illustrations Visualize it Make a chart Create a poster Body/Kinesthetic Role play Walkabout Dance Lip sync Skits/charades/mimes Construction Math manipulatives Sign language Sports Activity centers Body languageIntrapersonal Metacognition Use self-talk Work independently Solve in your own way Understand self Journal it Rehearse it Use prior knowledge Connect it Have ownershipInterpersonal Think-Pair-Share Jigsaw Cooperative grouping Drama Debates Class meetings Role play Meeting of minds Peer counseling Tutors/buddies Giving feedback Shared JournalsNaturalist Label it Categorize it Identify it Form a hypothesis Do an experiment Adapt it Construct it Classify it Investigate it Discern patterns

82 Choice Board or Tic-Tac-Toe

83

84 Verbal/LinguisticBody/KinestheticVisual/Spatial Musical/Rhythmical Wild Card Your choice after getting the approval of the teacher. Naturalist IntrapersonalInterpersonalLogical/Mathematical

85

86

87 Kinds of Evidence – Continuum of Evidence Informal Check for Understanding

88

89 Three types of curricula exist in any classroom: The Intended Curriculum: content/skill specified by the state, division, or school at a particular grade level. The Implemented Curriculum: content/skill actually delivered by the teacher. The Attained Curriculum: content/skill actually learned by the students. Intended Curriculum Implemented Curriculum Attained Curriculum Effective Instruction #2: focuses Effective Instruction #2: focuses on essential knowledge and essential skills Montana Content Standards and PerformanceDescriptors

90 Content-Related Evidence of Validity (Attained Curriculum) Essential Skills & Processes Essential Knowledge Essential Vocabulary LEARNING TARGET (attained curriculum)

91 True learning is figuring out what you already know in order to go beyond what you already think. Jerome Bruner True learning is figuring out what you already know in order to go beyond what you already think. Jerome Bruner The Power of Student Self-assessment to Refine Teacher Craft

92 Find a new friend in the room. Introduce yourself and share what you ‘do’. Find 2 comfortable seats and relax.

93 BRAIN BREAK Select Team Leaders

94

95 DO OR

96

97

98


Download ppt "Prepared for the History and Social Science Professional Learning Community of the Virginia School-University Partnership by Dan Mulligan, Ed. D. February."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google