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Figure 3.2 Changes in School-Age Population, 2000-2020 Percentage of children ages 5-17 Source: Data from U.S. Bureau of Census, 1998, Statistics, Washington,

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Presentation on theme: "Figure 3.2 Changes in School-Age Population, 2000-2020 Percentage of children ages 5-17 Source: Data from U.S. Bureau of Census, 1998, Statistics, Washington,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Figure 3.2 Changes in School-Age Population, Percentage of children ages 5-17 Source: Data from U.S. Bureau of Census, 1998, Statistics, Washington, DC: Author. ©2005 by Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved Introduction to Teaching: Becoming a Professional, 2 nd Edition Kauchak and Eggen

2 Students may not be ready to benefit from content instruction in English. Pull- out programs segregate students. Easier to administer when dealing with diverse language backgrounds. Pull-out programs where students are provided with supplementary English instruction or modified instruction in content areas (also called Sheltered English programs). English-as-a-Second- Language Programs (ESL) Loss of native language. “Sink or swim” approach hard on students. When effective, quick transition to English. Does not require teachers trained in second language. Students learn English by being “immersed” in classrooms where English is the only language spoken. Immersion Requires teachers trained in first language. Acquisition of English may not be as fast. Maintains first language. Transition to English is eased by gradual approach. Students learn to read in first language and are given supplementary instruction in English as a Second Language. Once English is mastered, students are placed in regular classrooms and first language is discontinued. Transition Requires teachers trained in first language. Acquisition of English may not be as fast. Students become literate in two languages. First language maintained through reading and writing activities in first language while English introduced. Maintenance DisadvantagesAdvantagesDescriptionType of Program ©2005 by Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved Introduction to Teaching: Becoming a Professional, 2 nd Edition Kauchak and Eggen Table 3.1 Different Programs for ELL Students

3 Figure 3.3 Sexual Harassment in U.S. Schools Percent Source: From American Association of University Women, (1993). Hostile hallways: The AAUW survey on sexual harassment in America’s schools. New York: Louis Harris and Associates. Reprinted by permission. ©2005 by Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved Introduction to Teaching: Becoming a Professional, 2 nd Edition Kauchak and Eggen

4 Table 3.2 Gardner’s Eight Intelligences Biologist, anthropologistThe ability to recognize similarities and differences in the physical world. Naturalist intelligence Self-aware individualAccess to one’s own “feeling life.”Intrapersonal intelligence Therapist, salespersonAn understanding of interpersonal relations and the ability to make distinctions among others. Interpersonal intelligence Dancer, athleteA fine-tuned ability to use the body and to handle objects. Bodily kinesthetic intelligence Sculptor, navigatorThe ability to perceive the visual world accurately, and to recreate, transform, or modify aspects of the world on the basis of one’s perceptions. Spatial intelligence Composer, violinistSensitivity to pitch, melody, and tone.Musical intelligence Scientist, mathematicianThe ability to handle long chains of reasoning and to recognize patterns and order in the world. Logical-mathematical intelligence Poet, journalistSensitivity to the meaning and order of words and the varied uses of language. Linguistic intelligence Individuals Who Might Be High in This Dimension DescriptionDimension Source: Adapted from H. Gardner and Hatch, 1989, Multiple intelligences go to school. Educational Researcher, 18(8), 4-10; and Chekles, 1997, The first seven... and the eighth. Educational Leadership, 55, ©2005 by Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

5 7. Early admission to college7. Academic competitions 6. Correspondence courses6. Small-group inquiry and investigations 5. College courses in high school5. Simulations and games 4. Credit by exam4. Saturday and summer programs 3. Subject skipping3. Field trips 2. Grade skipping2. Learning centers 1. Early admission to kindergarten and first grade1. Independent study and independent projects Acceleration OptionsEnrichment Options ©2005 by Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved Introduction to Teaching: Becoming a Professional, 2 nd Edition Kauchak and Eggen Table 3.3 Acceleration and Enrichment Options for Students Who Are Gifted and Talented


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