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Coevolution Laura Conner, Susan Hester, Anne-Marie Hoskinson, Mary Beth Leigh, Andy Martin, Tom Powers Context: LD evolution or ecology, 30-150 students.

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Presentation on theme: "Coevolution Laura Conner, Susan Hester, Anne-Marie Hoskinson, Mary Beth Leigh, Andy Martin, Tom Powers Context: LD evolution or ecology, 30-150 students."— Presentation transcript:

1 Coevolution Laura Conner, Susan Hester, Anne-Marie Hoskinson, Mary Beth Leigh, Andy Martin, Tom Powers Context: LD evolution or ecology, students Foundational knowledge: mechanisms of natural selection, adaptations, two-species interactions Preparation: definition of coevolution

2 Unit learning goals: Understand that species interact on an evolutionary time scale Know that other organisms can be powerful agents of selection

3 Unit learning outcomes: 1.Define coevolution. 2.Identify types of evidence that would help determine whether two species are currently in a coevolutionary relationship. 3.Interpret and draw graphs. 4.Evaluate evidence about whether two species are coevolving. 5.Make testable predictions based on the hypothesis that two species are coevolving. 6.Predict the outcome of a perturbation to a coevolved system.

4 Teachable tidbit learning outcome: 1.Define coevolution. 2.Identify the evidence that would help determine whether two species are currently in a coevolutionary relationship. 3.Interpret and draw graphs. 4.Evaluate evidence about whether two species are coevolving. 5.Make testable predictions based on the hypothesis that two species are coevolving. 6.Predict the outcome of a perturbation to a coevolved system.

5 Coevolution requires… Geographic overlap Reciprocal effects on traits

6 How is this coevolution? What happens to the gazelles when the cheetahs get faster?

7 The Plot: In the Rocky Mountains, red squirrels and crossbills both eat lodgepole pine seeds. In some locations, squirrels are absent. The species interact when they occur in the same place … but do they have reciprocal effects on one another’s traits? Red squirrels Crossbill birdsLodgepole pine cone After

8 Exhibit 1 From Benkman (2001) Evolution 55:

9 Exhibit 2 Bill Depth (mm) Survival From Benkman (2003) Evolution 57: = survived 0 = died Upper CI* Best fit line Lower CI* * CI = confidence interval

10 Exhibit 3 From Benkman (2003) American Naturalist 162:

11 Based on the data presented, ____________________ are in a coevolutionary relationship. (a) squirrels and pinecones (b) crossbills and pinecones (c) squirrels and crossbills (d) (a) and (b) (e) none of these species

12 Learning ObjectiveActive learningAssessmentDiversity Evaluate evidence about whether two species are coevolving. Case study Group processing Figure interpretation Relationship map Formative: Group processing about presence/direction of interaction Clicker question Video clip Individual and group learning Verbal, graphical, tactile information Summative: “Here are data for two species. Are they coevolving, or not? Why?”


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