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Creating and Using Learning Profiles in the Classroom Kenosha Unified School District Technology Camp Pam Black June 21, 2010.

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Presentation on theme: "Creating and Using Learning Profiles in the Classroom Kenosha Unified School District Technology Camp Pam Black June 21, 2010."— Presentation transcript:

1 Creating and Using Learning Profiles in the Classroom Kenosha Unified School District Technology Camp Pam Black June 21, 2010

2 Presentation Goals Bring background and prior knowledge to the conscious level Gather information about our own learning profiles and how they impact our instruction Learn techniques for assessing our students’ learning profiles in relationship to our instruction and the use of technology Change the way instructional planning is done Take us out of our comfort zone.

3 What is a Learning Profiles? A multi-faceted picture of how a Person thinks and learns

4 Learning Profiles Frames for understanding how students learn and process information Learning style is t he natural way a person: Takes in information Processes information through the senses Remembers information Approaches learning

5 Sharing Learning Styles Activity #1

6 Sharing Learning Styles Activity #1—Honoring All Beach Balls Concrete/random Accommodator Self-expressive dynamic Puppies Abstract/random Diverger Interpersonal Imaginative Microscopes Abstract/sequential Assimilator Understanding Analytical Clipboards Concrete/sequential Converger Mastery Commonsense

7 Learning Profiles Frames for understanding how students learn and process information Learning style: Beach Ball…Clipboard…Microscope…Puppy

8 Visual Sharing Learning Styles Activity #2 Visual Tactile/Kinesthetic Auditory

9 Visual Learners Generally think in terms of pictures. Remember things best by seeing something written. Prefers to see things written down in a handout, text or on the overhead. Find maps, graphs, charts, and other visual learning tools to be extremely effective.

10 Auditory Learners Learn best by listening and talking aloud. Typically notice and remember sounds. Good at remembering things that they hear. Good with words and language. Often read to themselves as they study. Often distracted by noise and sounds.

11 Tactile Learners Remember what they DO, what they experience with their hands or bodies (movement and touch). Enjoy using tools or lessons which involve active/practical participation. Can remember how to do things after they've done them once (motor memory). Have good motor coordination.

12 Tactile/Kinesthetic Learners Typically learn best by doing. Naturally good at physical activities like sports and dance. Enjoy learning through hands-on methods. Typically like how-to guides and action-adventure stories. Might pace while on the phone or take breaks from studying to get up and move around. Some kinesthetic learners seem fidgety, having a hard time sitting still in class.

13 Learning Profiles Frames for understanding how students learn and process information Learning style: Beach Ball…Clipboard…Microscope…Puppy Visual...Auditory…Tactile…Kinesthetic Multiple Intelligences

14 The Whole Learner Multiple Views Learning StylesMultiple Intelligences Process oriented- seeks to see how a person processes information through the senses. Cognitive Model– seeks to describe how a person uses their intelligence to solve problems and create products Auditory Learners Visual Learners Tactile learners Kinesthetic Learners Tactile/Kinesthetic learners Verbal/Linguistic Logical/mathematical Interpersonal Musical/rhythimic Intrapersonal Visual/spatial Bodily/kinesthetic naturalist

15 Multiple Intelligences: How are you smart? Word Smart Logic Smart Picture Smart Body Smart Music Smart Self Smart People Smart Natur e Smart Numbers &patterns Touch, movement, manipulatives Rhythm, melody, patterned sound, song, dance Graphic images& organizers, color and art Sharing, cooperating, relating, brainstorming, interviewing Working alone, self-paced, individual projects, metacognitive thinking Outdoors learning, classifying, noticing patterns in the world Reading, writing, speaking, & listening

16 Multiple Intelligences: Activity #3 How are you intelligent? What is your unique profile?

17 Learning Profiles What makes up a learning profile? Frames for understanding how students learn and process information Learning style: Beach Ball…Clipboard…Microscope…Puppy Visual...Auditory…Tactile…Kinesthetic Multiple Intelligences: Verbal/linguistic…Logical/mathematical…Interpersonal…Intrapersonal …Visual/spatial…Musical/rhythmic…Bodily/kinesthetic…Naturalist Lateral Dominance

18 Lateral Dominance Profiles Learning Equation (Eye + Ears + Hands + Feet) + Brain = Learning sensing organs + processing organ = learning

19 Lateral Dominance Profiles Activity #4 Learning Equation (Eye + Ears + Hands + Feet) + Brain = Learning sensing organs + processing organ = learning

20 Lateral Dominance Profiles Why look at lateral dominance profiles? 1. Identifies the learning path of least resistance. 2. When under stress or learning new information the learning path of least resistance is best. 3. Other pathways may not be accessible. 4. Organization of learners in the classroom. --Visual in front --Auditory in next row (right ear dominants on left side/left ear dominants on right side.) --Gestalt fully in back with manipulatives.

21 Learning Profiles What makes up a learning profile? Frames for understanding how students learn and process information Learning style: Beach Ball…Clipboard…Microscope…Puppy Visual...Auditory…Tactile…Kinesthetic Multiple Intelligences: Verbal/linguistic…Logical/mathematical…Interpersonal…Intrapersonal …Visual/spatial…Musical/rhythmic…Bodily/kinesthetic…Naturalist Lateral Dominance Eye…Ear…Hand…Foot…Brain Other critical factors

22 Other critical factors that are part of a learning profile GENDER …processing of information …language …space …movement …hearing …inter/intrapersonal …emotion

23 Other critical factors that are part of a learning profile RACE and Culture Eye contact Verbalization Community or Individual Focus on Education Relevance of Curriculum Relationships

24 What are Learning Profiles? What makes up a learning profile? Frames for understanding how students learn and process information Learning style: Beach Ball…Clipboard…Microscope…Puppy Visual...Auditory…Tactile…Kinesthetic Multiple Intelligences: Verbal/linguistic…Logical/mathematical…Interpersonal…Intrapersonal …Visual/spatial…Musical/rhythmic…Bodily/kinesthetic…Naturalist Lateral Dominance Eye…Ear…Hand…Foot…Brain Other Critical Factors Gender…Race….Culture

25 Learning Profiles in the Classroom Know Your Learners And Yourself

26 Rubric for knowing the learners in your classroom Non-useBeginningRoutineRefined No attempts made to Identify the uniqueness of learners Students’ learning profiles— learning styles, multiple intelligences and learning preferences are explored Provides a variety of assessment and instructional practices to routinely respect student learning profiles Allow students uniqueness to drive instructional practices.

27 Using Learning Profiles in the Classroom Step I Discover and know your own learning style and multiple intelligence strengths: Review your learning style multiple intelligences and lateral dominance screenings Go deeper: 1. Take the Learning Styles Test I and II 2. Take the Multiple Intelligence Assessment 3. Explore the information provided on your learning style, multiple intelligence strengths and dominance factors. 4. Explore your gender, racial and culturally impacted learning factors. Discover your students learning profiles—learning styles and/or multiple intelligences and/or lateral dominances. Take into account the other critical factors—gender, race and culture

28 Learning Profiles in the Classroom A Step Further: Connecting to Technology

29 Why use learning profiles in the classroom? Tapping into the routes for learning promotes efficient and effective learning for students. Helping students understand their modes of learning that work best for them ensures lifetime learning. Offering options allows each learner to find a good learning fit in the classroom Tomlinson, 2001

30 Implement Strategies that Support Learning Differences for all : No one technology is suited for all students and all curriculum. Auditory learners are the only students who excel in lecture based learning. Add alternatives to current assignments Use all the technology you have been introduced to in this class and more students will be more successful.

31 Using Computers to tap into Visual-Auditory- Tactile/Kinesthetic learning styles VisualAuditoryTactile/Kinesthetic Easy access to pictures, images, graphic organizers, mind-maps, concept maps, videos. Encourages artistic expression Access to world of words Word processing Clip art Inspirations Power Point U Tube Communicate with people around the world about ideas Free translation software allows for dialogue around the world. Listening to music—period music. Textbooks on the web Skype Audio and video taping Touching the keyboard helps input and remember the information. Use of body activity (force/sense of touch)— Document Camera— input/demonstrate students' written work. Tutorials on the web. Using the mouse/keyboard accesses the kinesthetic/tactile receptors in the brain Students using flip charts Active Expression

32 Other Technology that taps into multiple learning styles Animation programs—visual, kinesthetic Digital cameras—kinesthetic and visual Promethium boards—kinesthetic, visual and auditory Multimedia (combine video, sound, text, graphics)—engages all learning style.

33 Lesson Planning for Student Engagement Differentiation Lesson provides several learning options (different paths to learning) which help students take in information and make sense of concepts and skills. Access to a variety of materials which target different learning preferences/reading abilities. Activities that target auditory, visual and kinesthetic learners Stations for inquiry-based, independent learning activities Create activities that vary in level of complexity and degree of abstract thinking required. Flexible grouping to group and regroup students based on factors including content, ability and assessment results. Choice of projects that reflect a variety of learning styles and interests Multiple ways to demonstrate what they know. Active participants in setting their own educational goals, managing learning and assess their own progress.


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