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This presentation was created with funding support from the USDA/NIFA E-IPM grant program.

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Presentation on theme: "This presentation was created with funding support from the USDA/NIFA E-IPM grant program."— Presentation transcript:

1 This presentation was created with funding support from the USDA/NIFA E-IPM grant program

2 Components of the School IPM Law The law is categorized into the follow sections:  What IPM is, and who’s included ( )  List of low-impact pesticides ( (5))  IPM Plan ( )  IPM Plan Coordinators ( )  Pesticide applications and declared emergencies ( – )  Notification and posting of pesticide applications ( )  Pesticide application records ( ) This presentation was created with funding support from the USDA/NIFA E-IPM grant program

3 What is Integrated Pest Management? ( ) The law defines IPM as a method of pest management that:  Is a proactive approach to pest management to achieve long-term pest prevention and suppression  Protects health and safety of humans, the campus grounds and structures, and the ecosystem by opting for reduced risk approaches to managing and preventing pests  Prefers non-chemical methods over the use of pesticides. This includes sanitation and physical changes  Does not apply pesticides for purely aesthetic purposes This presentation was created with funding support from the USDA/NIFA E-IPM grant program

4 What is Integrated Pest Management? ( ) The law defines IPM as a method of pest management that:  Regularly monitors and inspects for pests  Educates school staff about monitoring, sanitation, and pest inspecting  Bases action on pest thresholds  Evaluates the effectiveness of pest control  Allows for use of a low-impact pesticide if non- chemical efforts alone are unsuccessful This presentation was created with funding support from the USDA/NIFA E-IPM grant program

5 List of Low-impact Pesticides ( ) Low-impact pesticides are those that:  Have the signal word “Caution” on the product’s label  Meet other criteria to indicate they are not carcinogenic  Each school district’s board must approve a list of low-impact pesticides  The Oregon State University School IPM Program produces a low-impact list (available online), based on products suggested by school staff This presentation was created with funding support from the USDA/NIFA E-IPM grant program

6 IPM Plan ( ) IPM Plan ( ) The law requires each district to have a district IPM plan:  The Plan must contain information that is compliant with the school IPM law, and protects against pesticide exposure.  The Oregon State University School IPM Program created a template for an IPM Plan that schools can use.  It is the IPM Coordinator’s job to create the IPM Plan and get it board-approved. This presentation was created with funding support from the USDA/NIFA E-IPM grant program

7 IPM Plan Coordinators ( ) IPM Plan Coordinators ( ) The law requires that each district appoint an IPM Plan Coordinator (aka “District IPM Coordinator”). The IPM Coordinator is:  Responsible for overseeing all matters of pest prevention and suppression in their district  Responsible for keeping pesticide application records  Responsible for successfully completing six hours of annual IPM training per year, which includes review of IPM and the school IPM law  Responsible for making sure all aspects of Oregon’s school IPM law are followed in their district This presentation was created with funding support from the USDA/NIFA E-IPM grant program

8 IPM Plan Coordinators ( ) IPM Plan Coordinators ( ) …Cont’d…. The IPM Coordinator is:  Responsible for periodically assessing pest control measures to ensure IPM is taking place  Responsible for making sure all aspects of Oregon’s school IPM law are followed in their school district This presentation was created with funding support from the USDA/NIFA E-IPM grant program

9 Pesticide Applications and Declared Emergencies ( ) Pesticide Applications and Declared Emergencies ( ) The law has specific requirements for each individual pesticide application, including “emergency” situations  Pesticide applications are allowed after non- chemical methods alone were insufficient to manage the pest issue  Applications must occur with the IPM Coordinator’s approval  Declaring a “pest emergency” requires involvement by the IPM Coordinator, among others. Pest emergencies allow for application of non-Caution labeled products This presentation was created with funding support from the USDA/NIFA E-IPM grant program

10 Notification and Posting of Pesticide Applications ( ) Notification and Posting of Pesticide Applications ( ) The law requires notification for each instance of a pesticide application  Written notice must be provided to the school community (parents/guardians, staff, adult students, administrators, etc.) at least 24 prior to application  Notice about each pesticide application must include: 1.Pesticide product name 2.EPA reg. # from label 3.Expected area of application 4.Expected date of application 5.Reason for application This presentation was created with funding support from the USDA/NIFA E-IPM grant program

11 Notification and Posting of Pesticide Applications ( ) Notification and Posting of Pesticide Applications ( ) The law requires posting for each instance of a pesticide application  Place warning signs around pesticide application areas  At least 24 hours BEFORE each application, and leave signs up for at least 72 hours AFTER each application is completed  Warning sign must include: 1.“Warning: Pesticide Treated Area” 2.Expected date of application 3.Telephone number of a contact person This presentation was created with funding support from the USDA/NIFA E-IPM grant program

12 Pesticide Application Records ( ) Pesticide Application Records ( ) The law requires Pesticide application records be kept for each pesticide application  Information kept on file for each application must include: 1.Material safety data sheet (MSDS) 2.Pesticide product name 3.EPA reg. number from label 4.Pest/situation prompting application 5.Area of campus where application occurred 6.Amount and concentration of pesticide applied …Cont’d…. This presentation was created with funding support from the USDA/NIFA E-IPM grant program

13 Pesticide Application Records ( ) Pesticide Application Records ( ) …Cont’d…. 7.Type of application (e.g., bait, spray, gel, etc.), and whether it was effective 8.License number of pesticide applicator 9.Name of pesticide applicator 10.Date of notices provided to school staff, parents/guardians, etc. 11.Dates and times of placement of warning signs, and removal of warning signs  Records for each application must be on file AT THE SCHOOL WHERE THE APPLICATION OCCURRED  Records must be kept for at least FOUR YEARS This presentation was created with funding support from the USDA/NIFA E-IPM grant program

14 Pesticides can be applied legally in Oregon schools: But NOT for “routine” pest management If used after other measures fail (sanitation, staff education, exclusion/maintenance, etc.) …OR… as a first resort in cases of declared pest emergencies With proper posting and notification “Caution” label products only (except in cases of declared pest emergencies) By a licensed applicator, apprentice, or trainee Pesticide licensing options available from the Oregon Department of Agriculture: School IPM & Pesticides This presentation was created with funding support from the USDA/NIFA E-IPM grant program


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