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Geography 111, Section 002 Lab # 9 – April 23, 2010 Steve Zwolinski Eirik Guloien Aaron Dodson Brian Hall.

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Presentation on theme: "Geography 111, Section 002 Lab # 9 – April 23, 2010 Steve Zwolinski Eirik Guloien Aaron Dodson Brian Hall."— Presentation transcript:

1 Geography 111, Section 002 Lab # 9 – April 23, 2010 Steve Zwolinski Eirik Guloien Aaron Dodson Brian Hall

2 Basic information (species, range, life history) Invasive characteristics Some maps to look at Where has it affected us? The Effects of The Killer Bee Management http://www.cdfa.ca.gov/phpps/pdep/target_pest_disease_profiles/ahb_profile.html

3 Killer Bee also known as the Africanized honeybee Latin name: Apis mellifera scutellata Range: Imported from Africa in the 1950’s to South America Began to creep up the coast in the 1980’s towards N. America Found in Texas in 1990, now in California, 5 other states http://www.genome.gov/Images/press_photos/highres/76-300.jpg

4 Cross-bred between European honeybees and African honeybees Lives mostly in the tropics of South America, especially in the rainforests of Brazil Rapidly populating the southern United States (especially in the past 20 years)

5 http://www.ars.usda.gov/Research/docs.htm?docid=11059&page=6

6 Scout bees go ahead of queen to find new home Queen broods offspring, leaves comb in “swarm” every 12 months May find a new hive, leaving younger queen at current comb Much more likely to swarm vs. European honeybees Usually takes a smaller area (old tires, overturned pots, house eaves) than EHB http://www.ars.usda.gov/Research/docs.htm?docid=11059&page=2

7 Accidentally released in 1957 in Brazil. Attempted to breed a strain of bee that would produce more honey and be better adapted to tropical conditions (more productive) than the European bees used in South America and southern North America. African queens eventually mated with local drones.

8 As of 2002, the African honeybees had spread from Brazil south to northern Argentina and north to South and Central America, Trinidad (West Indies), Mexico, Texas, Arizona, New Mexico, Florida and southern California.

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10 Tropical Subtropical Arid/ Dry Desert Savanna

11 Cannot survive extended periods of forage deprivation, preventing introduction into areas with harsh winters or extremely dry late summers. More likely to migrate as part of a seasonal response to lowered food supply. More likely to relocate in response to stress.

12 Well Suited for Most Climates (Hot, Cold, Dry, Wet, Etc.) Thrives on High Resources Frequent Swarming and New Colony Development Fast Colony Formation Workers Search Farther and Longer Efficient Use of Resources – Minimal Honey Can Survive on Minimal Amount of Food and Resources if Needed Ojar, Christina. "Killer Bees." Columbia University in the City of New York. Columbia University, 1 Mar. 2002. Web. 16 Apr. 2010..

13 Africanized Honeybee is Very Aggressive Attack When Unprovoked with More Bees and a Higher Number of Stings Sense Threats from 50+ Feet Away Known to Follow Threats up to a ¼ Mile Away! Epitome of the American Dream – Hard Work Equals Success! Ojar, Christina. "Killer Bees." Columbia University in the City of New York. Columbia University, 1 Mar. 2002. Web. 16 Apr. 2010..

14 Out competes other bees Takes over pollination and bumps out honey production of other bees Bad for economies Lowers honey production in the market Dangerous – Has killed over 1000 people since its introduction Ojar, Christina. "Killer Bees." Columbia University in the City of New York. Columbia University, 1 Mar. 2002. Web. 16 Apr. 2010..

15 It’s Hard Working Nature Makes Wide Spread Pollination of Wide Variety of Plants Including Crops Plants Don’t Discriminate Over Who Pollinates Them Ojar, Christina. "Killer Bees." Columbia University in the City of New York. Columbia University, 1 Mar. 2002. Web. 16 Apr. 2010..

16 Specialists agree that honey bees are economically and environmentally important and can not just be wiped out…..so Honey bee monitoring programs have been set up The programs: Are good indicators of how well the flowering plants and the ecosystem health is doing http://www.greatsunflower.org/files/images/dark_honey_bee_hemberger.jpg Ojar, Christina. “Africanized Honey Bee.” Introduced Species Summary Project. 1 March 2002. Web. 16 April 2010. . http://www.bogoboo.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/Bee.jpg

17 Drone Flooding Beekeepers put less aggressive European Honey Bees in areas where African drone bees are usually present. Re-Queening Beekeeper replaces queen of the colony with the European Bee Yields less aggressive bees that still pollinate Get rid of wild bee nests so that the managed ones will have less competition Ojar, Christina. “Africanized Honey Bee.” Introduced Species Summary Project. 1 March 2002. Web. 16 April 2010. . Also

18 The public needs to be made aware of the threat of killer bees and know how to properly deal with them: Telephone numbers of professionals, etc Know precautions to take in case of a bee sting Fun Fact: At least one meal a day per person is made possible because of the bee, so they are not just pests. http://images.clipartof.com/small/85294-Royalty-Free-RF-Clipart-Illustration-Of-A-Friendly-Cute-Bee-Waving-And-Flying.jpg Ojar, Christina. “Africanized Honey Bee.” Introduced Species Summary Project. 1 March 2002. Web. 16 April 2010. .


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