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And stop making the same mistakes..  To Propose or Not to Propose  Anatomy of a Solicitation  Developing the Proposal  Evaluation Process  Transitions,

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Presentation on theme: "And stop making the same mistakes..  To Propose or Not to Propose  Anatomy of a Solicitation  Developing the Proposal  Evaluation Process  Transitions,"— Presentation transcript:

1 And stop making the same mistakes.

2  To Propose or Not to Propose  Anatomy of a Solicitation  Developing the Proposal  Evaluation Process  Transitions, Performance, More Business  Learning from Our Successes How to Write An Award Winning Proposal  To Propose or Not to Propose  Anatomy of a Solicitation  Developing the Proposal  Evaluation Process

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4  Have you thoroughly read the solicitation, and completely understand the requirements?  Is your company a known entity to the customer/agency?  Do you have recent and relevant successful experience performing this kind of work?

5  Can you effectively communicate that you understand the requirements and have a solution that meets those requirements “Win Theme”?  Are you aware of your competition—their strengths, weaknesses, successful experience with this type of requirement?

6  Does this opportunity align with your company growth goals; does it pose a potential conflict of interest?  What is the return on investment?  What are the risks?  Are we teaming with frontrunners?

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8  Executive summary  Opportunity description  Contract requirements and reasons for the contract  Agency, site, & customer profiles  Customer issues and hot buttons  Photos

9  Competitive intelligence  Own competitive position  Bidder comparison  BOE/pricing-to-win assessment  Technical & management approach  FOIA Info

10  Estimated requirements: staffing, equipment, deliverables, reporting, facilities  Teaming and subcontracting  Win strategy  Themes & discriminators  Risks & mitigations  Actions plans  Attachments

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12  Good method to understand how a particular procurement opportunity aligns with both your strengths and weaknesses, and those of your likely competitors, before proceeding. External Origin Environmental attributes Internal Origin Attributes of the company Helpful To achieving the objective Harmful To achieving the objective Strengths What advantages do we have? What do we do better than anyone else? Cost? Quality? Service? Weaknesses What can we improve? What should be avoided? What will others see as weaknesses? Opportunities What are the elements of the project that could be exploited for advantage? Marketplace trends? Threats What are the elements in the environment that could cause trouble? Competitors? Requirements?

13 NO! NO! MAYBE? COMPETITORS’OFFERINGS Our Weakness ⁻Customer Needs It ⁻Competitor Has It ⁻We Don’t Have It Irrelevant Position ⁻Customer Doesn’t Need It ⁻Competitor Has It ⁻We Have It YES! Competitive Advantage Our Discriminators Customer Needs It Competitor Doesn’t Have It We Have It Neutral Position Customer Needs It Competitor Has It We Have It Source: Shipley Associates

14  Everything is looking good. You’re ready to write your proposal... Ready to Go Win strategy Understanding of customer Ability to meet requirements Competitive intel Gate/color reviews Proposal process/method Proposal team & resources Favored position Frontrunner team partners

15 … not yet, let’s look at the solicitation.  Everything is looking good. You’re ready to write your proposal...

16  To Propose or Not to Propose  Anatomy of a Solicitation  Developing the Proposal  Evaluation Process How to Write An Award Winning Proposal

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18  A Solicitation/contract form  B Supplies or services and prices/costs  C Description/specifications/work statement  D Packaging and marking  E Inspection and acceptance  F Deliveries or performance  G Contract administration data  H Special contract requirements

19  I Contract clauses  J List of attachments

20  K Representations, certifications, and other statements of offerors or quoters  L Instructions, conditions, and notices to offerors or quoters  M Evaluation factors for award

21  To Propose or Not to Propose  Anatomy of a Solicitation  Developing the Proposal  Evaluation Process How to Write An Award Winning Proposal

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23  Compliance Matrix  Every draft should start with a compliance matrix.  All salient points that need to be addressed within all volumes should be listed in a matrix.  Organization of the matrix is personal choice.  Continued VolumeSectionPage AllocationStatus ICover Page1Complete ICover Letter2In progress ITable of Cont1Not Started ISummary1Not Started IWrite up/body3550%

24 VolumeSectionStatus IISF 33/SF30In Progress IISection KComplete IISF LLLComplete IICorporate ViabilityComplete IICorporate Responsibility50% IIPast Performance Data SheetsComplete

25  Technical Proposal  Cover letter (there’s a FAR clause for that--52.215-1)  Table of Contents  Executive Summary (should follow the cover letter, but generally written last)  HOW your company will meet the requirements  EXAMPLES of meeting similar requirements**good way to integrate your past performance into your technical narrative**  ACCOMPLISHMENTS/notable points (savings, efficiencies, benefits derived by customers in the past)  Any trade off items as noted in section M? Be clear and concise

26  Solicitation Package (may be more than one volume)  Cover letter (there’s a FAR clause for that--52.215-1)  Standards forms (SF1449; SF33; SF30; SFLLL; DD254) signed and dated  Table of Contents  Executive Summary (should follow the cover letter, but generally written last)  Representations and Certifications  Past Performance – provide recent and relative single cover page, up to 2 additional pages allowed. Check all boxes, including small business subcontracting, and address historic compliance if required.

27  SCA certification  System for Award Management (SAM)  Corporate Viability  Financial Statements  Cash Flow  Demonstrate Financial Resources  Budget and Financial Management  Government approved purchasing/accounting system, if not:  Recent third party audit of financial system  Demonstrate how company promotes competition, timeliness, quality, fair and reasonable pricing

28  Describe corporate oversight—internal controls for prevention of fraud, waste and abuse of Government equipment  And then? Price proposal!  Price Proposal  Cover Letter  Be clear and concise  Use any forms provided

29  To Propose or Not to Propose  Anatomy of a Solicitation  Developing the Proposal  Evaluation Process How to Write An Award Winning Proposal

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31  Basis for Award  What type of criteria? Best value? Lowest price/Technically acceptable?  Does your proposal meet minimum requirements as outlined in evaluation criteria?  Have you increased your value with stupendous trade off factors?

32  Evaluation and Decision Process FAR 15.306(c) and 15.306(b)(1)  Understand agency source selection procedures DoD Source Selection Procedures

33  They used to be conducted towards the end  Many requested early in the evaluation process  Examines accounting system, cost proposal, workup materials, corporate records and systems

34  Deficiencies  Weaknesses  Risks  Errors  Omissions  Clarifications  Questions  Discrepancies FAR 15.306 At a minimum, the contracting officer must indicate to, or discuss with, each offeror still being considered for award, deficiencies, significant weaknesses, and adverse past performance information to which the offeror has not yet had an opportunity to respond. The contracting officer also is encouraged to discuss other aspects of the offeror’s proposal that could, in the opinion of the contracting officer, be altered or explained to enhance materially the proposal’s potential for award. However, the contracting officer is not required to discuss every area where the proposal could be improved.

35  Preaward notices: notices of exclusion from competitive range  Apparent winner notice: issued to indicate pending award to successful offeror  Postaward notices: issued within 3 days after the date of contract to offerors whose proposal were in competitive range, but not selected  Award notice: issued to successful offeror

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37  Preaward debriefing, 15.505, 15.503(a)  Submit request within 3 days after receipt of exclusion from competition  You may request delay until after award notice  Postaward debriefing, 15.506, 15.503(b)  Submit request within 3 days after receipt of exclusion from competition  Protests, 15.507  See FAR Part 33–Protests, Disputes, and Appeals

38  Request a debriefing for all proposals, winners and losers All proposals can be successful—winners and losers Unintended, but successful Planned and successful Failed and not planned Planned, but Failed SUCCESS FAILURE PLANNED UNPLANNED

39  Questions? Stop making the same mistakes Sharon Baris Contract Administrator Crowley Technical Services, LLC 904.727.2270 sharon.baris@crowley.com Don Zavesky PTAC Specialist UNF SBDC 904.620.7476 don.zavesky@unf.edu


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